Print Story We'll be together for a thousand years
Diary
By TheophileEscargot (Tue Jun 15, 2010 at 01:59:43 PM EST) Reading, Listening, MLP (all tags)
Listening: "European History and European Lives". Web.


Listening
Latest TTC course was European History and European Lives: 1715 to 1914 by Jonathan Steinberg. 36 half-hour lectures.

Interesting experiment: he's trying to tell the story of the creation of modern Europe through biographies of statesmen, scientists, artists and writers. Roughly the first half of each lecture is a description of the context, the second half a biography, often concentrating on key events.

Has the weakness you'd expect: there's just not enough time. Found it interesting for the figures I knew little about: Augustus the Strong, Louis Pasteur, C.P.E. Bach, Friedrich Krupp, N.M. Rothschild. But didn't really learn much more about Charles Darwin or Karl Marx. I'm moderately familiar with European history so would have liked more biography and less background, but then the biographies would have been unintelligible to beginners.

Overall, could be worthwhile if you want an introduction to European history with some neat character sketches, but not really worthwhile if you know some already.

Random factoids:

  • Louis Pasteur had trouble with his University entrance exams: failed to get into his first choice altogether, and had to sit the exams twice to make his second.
  • Napoleon made use of plebiscites: always handy for a populist tyrant.
  • C.P.E. Bach and Goya were pioneers at making a living through selling to a mass audience as well as wealthy patrons.
  • Steinberg reckons that the 1709 English copyright act was instrumental in allowing independent writers to make a living.
  • Holy Roman Emperor Joseph II tried to introduce Enlightenment reforms by dictat from above, but failed due to resistance from the noble class, and impractical centralization
  • "Burke became the prophet of a right wing that he would not have liked. His real disciples were not liberals but reactionaries, anti-Semites, and enemies of the modern world."
  • Hebrew and dialects gave Jews a secure "encryption" which helped in money transfers: a highwayman couldn't know what was in a letter of credit
  • Giuseppe Mazzini
  • "The novelist Alessandro Manzoni (1785-1873) "invented" modern Italian when he decided to write a novel in Italian in 1821."
  • Steinberg on Anglo-American misunderstanding. "In England, the best thing you can be is amusing or clever; and the worst is tiresome or a bore. In America, the best thing you can be is sincere or genuine; and the worst is a phoney."
  • "Napoleon III caused the weakening of Austria, defeated Austria in a war in 1859, and thus, created the necessary conditions for the rise of Bismarck and Prussia"
  • Unlike a typical Prussian aristocrat, Otto von Bismarck never served in the army, and had a bourgeois education including a law degree.
Upcoming
Grabbed four courses on special offer.
  1. Understanding the Human Factor: Life and Its Impact (i.e. history of agriculture)
  2. Origin of Civilization
  3. Thinking about Capitalism
  4. Age of Henry VIII
Web
Graphs. Migrants to US acquire English faster. (via). Interactive US internal migration.

Photography project, not much so far: Perspectives on Poverty (via).

Articles. Cameron and NHS localism. How did sport get so big? David Mitchell on "Academy of English":

Where is their evidence that manacling our language to past usage is at all helpful or necessary? It would only stand in the way of the all-conquering self-diversification that has made English the global lingua franca, and allowed "lingua franca" to become an English phrase, while the French kick impotently against "le weekend"...

But what most annoys about the scheme is that it completely misses the point of linguistic pedantry. It's no fun prissily adhering to grammatical rules if it's mandatory. This academy wishes to turn something I have chosen to do -- an attitude by which I define myself -- into something I'm forced to do, along with everyone else. That's like making everyone support Manchester United.

< Official Brasil vs. DPRK Speculation Diary | Brasil v. DPRK Halftime Report >
We'll be together for a thousand years | 39 comments (39 topical, 0 hidden)
That bloody Polly Toynbee article. by ambrosen (4.00 / 1) #1 Tue Jun 15, 2010 at 02:48:47 PM EST
There was no need for you to go round posting articles I agreed with by her.

Realistically, the NHS localism thing? She hit the nail on the head there, and the outcry from the commenters is exactly the point: people need to realise that you might be able to invest what you want in the NHS (although we can't), but you can't make the people who treat you better at doing it without plenty of sick people for them to practise on.

(Comment Deleted) by xth (4.00 / 1) #2 Tue Jun 15, 2010 at 02:50:55 PM EST

This comment has been deleted by xth



Forgot to fill in that bit by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #3 Tue Jun 15, 2010 at 03:05:03 PM EST
I was interested in Steinberg's opinion that he was a romantic who was too idealistic to be really successful. From the notes:
D. Thus, Italy was unified in direct opposition to Mazzini’s values.

1. It was not unified by a national, popular uprising, nor was unified Italy a democratic republic.

2. Italy was unified as a result of foreign intervention: France defeated Austria, while Britain and Russia stayed neutral.

3. The new Italy was a kingdom, a monarchical state, established and ruled by an old aristocracy in Piedmont.

4. Mazzini’s despair was great. He called the result “the ghost of Italy.”


--
It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?
[ Parent ]
(Comment Deleted) by xth (4.00 / 1) #4 Tue Jun 15, 2010 at 03:11:56 PM EST

This comment has been deleted by xth



[ Parent ]
God, you're so middle class.... by Writer In Residence (2.00 / 0) #5 Wed Jun 16, 2010 at 04:39:25 PM EST



Hi Egil by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #6 Thu Jun 17, 2010 at 02:48:37 AM EST
So, how are you doing these days? You've been a Full Time Professional Writer for over a year now, books cruising up the bestseller list are they?
--
It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?
[ Parent ]
I gues you're not familiar with how books get by Writer In Residence (2.00 / 0) #7 Sun Jun 20, 2010 at 11:03:36 PM EST
published. Not sure how to answer you.


[ Parent ]
You claimed to have several books in the pipeline by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #8 Mon Jun 21, 2010 at 02:14:52 AM EST
There ought to be some advance publicity around by now. If you were really a Full Time Professional Writer, rather than a Walter Mitty fantasist.

But I've had a Google round, and there doesn't seem to be anything since that online horror short story from ages ago. Love the Garth Marenghi look on the author photo though.

Egil
--
It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?

[ Parent ]
Wow, full disclosure. by Writer In Residence (2.00 / 0) #9 Mon Jun 21, 2010 at 03:28:34 PM EST
I guess someone has no class....

Yeah, like I said, I guess you don't know how things work in the publishing industry. Sometimes non-fiction takes a bit of time to edit and get through the various hands that want to handle it. But, thanks for paying such close attention.

I find it funny that all you have to do is prod a prick and they make themselves look bad by Googling, putting pics online and all the rest. Make sure your next diary has something about 'Things I'm Being Classy About.'


[ Parent ]
Hi Egil by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #10 Mon Jun 21, 2010 at 04:38:03 PM EST
Yeah, your Korean Loller Blader, Clipper Ship and Egil Skallagrimsson accounts sure are great examples of classiness.

So to recap: all your writing projects have failed apart from the one where you did some dog-work for an academic, right?
--
It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?

[ Parent ]
Yeah, no they haven't. by Writer In Residence (2.00 / 0) #11 Mon Jun 21, 2010 at 05:15:42 PM EST
You are just unsure about how publishing works. That's okay, but it must tarnish your carefully built image of faux establishment intelligence to be so publicly petty and low. I'm fine with it, but you really should catch up on how things work some time, kid.


[ Parent ]
Hehe by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #12 Tue Jun 22, 2010 at 01:59:50 AM EST
So, what stage are your books at? Copy editing? Advance reading copies being circulated? Reviewing the page proofs? Making up pathetic lies to try to impress strangers on the Internet?
--
It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?
[ Parent ]
Hey it's cool, man. by Writer In Residence (2.00 / 0) #13 Tue Jun 22, 2010 at 04:59:38 PM EST
I get that you don't know how things go. Just let it go. Some of these things take time.


[ Parent ]
C'mon dude by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #14 Wed Jun 23, 2010 at 01:43:39 AM EST
All you need is to write one sentence "I'm reviewing the proofs, the novel should be out sometime in 2011".

Normally the schedule is set before that stage of course, George R.R. Martin is always complaining that Amazon has precise publication dates for books he hasn't finished writing. So for bonus points you can explain why Walter Mitty Publishing has a process that works differently.
--
It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?

[ Parent ]
Wow, name dropping. by Writer In Residence (2.00 / 0) #15 Sat Jul 03, 2010 at 10:34:56 PM EST
Well done. When you publish a book and see how it all works get back to me. Some linger. Especially non-fiction.


[ Parent ]
Hehe by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #16 Mon Jul 05, 2010 at 04:36:57 PM EST
Only you could think that was name-dropping.

Now, you've spent three weeks in this diary being vaguely evasive. How about some specific evasions. What is it you think I don't understand? How does your publishing process differ from the one I linked to? Be creative!
--
It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?

[ Parent ]
ROR. eal-life doesn't equal Google, maybe? by Writer In Residence (2.00 / 0) #17 Sun Jul 18, 2010 at 09:43:41 PM EST
Don't want to rock your world there. Ever hear of a book taking a little while to make it through the usual channels? Google some more, or go to a few more museums. You're bound to happen upon the answer.

Protip: Publishing books isn't like choosing print on your Word file.


[ Parent ]
Heh, that's another vague evasion by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #18 Mon Jul 19, 2010 at 02:23:34 PM EST
Why so reluctant to be specific?
--
It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?
[ Parent ]
Becuause legal matters conflict with by Writer In Residence (2.00 / 0) #19 Wed Aug 04, 2010 at 10:36:42 PM EST
rampant internet posting. Even that gigantic dick Cory Doctorow (likely your favorite author) knows that much. This is such a weak and lame troll. Especially for someone so proud that he is ascending from the grimy depths of the middle class (and yes, I am larfing at you.) by going to museums and reading 'important' books. Welcome to the 20th century.


[ Parent ]
"Legal matters", eh? by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #20 Thu Aug 05, 2010 at 02:50:42 PM EST
Now remember that you claimed to be working on both a novel of your own, and to be contributing to a non-fiction book about William Burroughs.

Are you claiming the same lawsuit prevents you saying what stage at publication you're at for both books? Or are there two separate legal matters with the same unlikely effect?
--
It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?

[ Parent ]
Guess what? by Writer In Residence (2.00 / 0) #21 Thu Aug 05, 2010 at 10:59:04 PM EST
I'm not going to tell a middle-aged, middle-class asshole on the internet my business. Nonetheless, you have reviewed at least one of my books in your pretentious diaries already, and mentioned another. I can only suspect that more of the same will happen....


[ Parent ]
Oh dear oh dear Dave by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #22 Fri Aug 06, 2010 at 01:35:25 PM EST
You're failing to keep your lies straight as it is. "Legal matters" might have been remotely plausible for an uncertain publication date of one book, but two is ludicrous.

So adding another lie just makes things worse. You've spent a month dodging publishing schedule questions, so to suddenly claim you're already published when the lies start to collapse is a pretty desperate move.

But let's run with it. Remember that most of the books I read are published in the UK, are by British writers, and are fairly old ones from the library. So the number of possible books is few. From my spreadsheet, the North American books by non-veteran writers in the last couple of years I've reviewed are:

"The Windup Girl" by Paolo Bacigalupi: debut SF novel by someone who actively promotes his own books with personal appearances.

"Love of Shopping is Not a Gene" by Anne Innis Dagg, a geneticist at the University of Waterloo. Near you in Ontario, but you're no scientist. You might have done some proofreading or copyediting on it I suppose.

"The Happiness Hypothesis" by Jonathan Haidt, a professor of psychology at the University of Virginia.

So, which of these people are you claiming to be? They don't look like you at all.
--
It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?

[ Parent ]
OMG, you know my name! by Writer In Residence (2.00 / 0) #23 Fri Aug 06, 2010 at 08:16:32 PM EST
You've bested me at the internet!

Sorry, kid. You have reviewed a couple of mine, yes I don't use my name for that kind of work and no the legal issues involved are what is keeping my other project on hold and likely will for the rest of this year.

But, thanks for the conversation there, Magnum P.I. It's been fun. Don't let looking in from the outside keep you down.


[ Parent ]
Sure, make it two by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #24 Mon Aug 09, 2010 at 02:07:54 PM EST
Why not? So let's review the things we must accept to believe you're really a Full Time Professional Writer, not a Walter Mitty who just fantasizes about being one.
  1. When asked why no books had appeared yet from your professional writing period, for some reason you didn't say they'd been published under a pseudonym, you spent a month arguing I didn't understand publication schedules.
  2. When that failed to convince, for some reason you didn't move on to the pseudonym explanation, you started going on about "legal matters".
  3. Since the only candidate writers I've reviewed have author photos and promote their books in person and don't look like you, somehow you've disguised yourself or hired actors to promote on your behalf.
  4. Despite having two professionally published books in print, you're also pursuing an unpaid amateur career with the self-published Destroy all Planets and the horror fiction website.
  5. You've chosen to use your real name for the vanity press and amateur websites, but a pseudonym for two professionally published books.
So, what do you want to add next? May as well add a Booker nomination or Pulitzer prize too, surely?
--
It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?
[ Parent ]
Wow, you REALLY pay attention by Writer In Residence (2.00 / 0) #25 Mon Aug 09, 2010 at 03:50:14 PM EST
Does it bug you that you have nothing interesting to say? And that you are obsessive about something you claim to not care about?


[ Parent ]
Heh by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #26 Mon Aug 09, 2010 at 04:06:26 PM EST
You've been posting these bizarre lies in my diary for two years before I bothered to Google you, and I'm the obsessive one?
--
It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?
[ Parent ]
Hurts, right? by Writer In Residence (2.00 / 0) #27 Mon Aug 09, 2010 at 05:29:32 PM EST
Knowing that you Googled me and I've never Googled you? I mean, you pedestrian reviews and your shitty opinions on the most middle-class shit possible is embarrassing enough. But, now you dog an author that has been smart enough to not be all over the internet? Stay classy, San Diego.

Also, that old thing that douches do when they say 'Heh' as if they were larfing is really dumb. Maybe not do that anymore.


[ Parent ]
Well by ucblockhead (2.00 / 0) #28 Tue Aug 10, 2010 at 12:56:16 PM EST
I've had three books published, and nothing he's said seems clueless about the process to me...
---
[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
[ Parent ]
Publishing how-to books about computers by Writer In Residence (2.00 / 0) #29 Tue Aug 10, 2010 at 01:44:47 PM EST
is vastly different from actual literature. You write manuals, not unlike the sort found in the glove-box of my car. Those aren't books. They are collections of procedures.

So, yes, he probably has the process for publishing an extended pamphlet down pat. I'm fairly my dog has that down pat, too. It's simplistic and logical. He does not, however, remotely understand how hard it is to get the legal rights to various historical pieces from various people and why the work is easy once you've finished the writing and now need to publish. It takes years.

Also, thanks for paying attention.


[ Parent ]
Actually by ucblockhead (2.00 / 0) #30 Tue Aug 10, 2010 at 03:44:54 PM EST
The process for published books is much the same:
  • You find an agent. 
  • You submit sample chapters. 
  • You get a contract. 
  • You get part of your advance. 
  • You write the book. 
  • You submit the book. 
  • Your book is edited.  (Your "getting rights" issue goes here if you were too lame to do it at the outset.)
  • You get galleys.   
  • You submit final revisions.   
  • You get a review copy.   
  • You get the rest of your advance.  
  • Your book hits bookstores.   
  • Six months later, if you start to get royalty statements.  If your book earns out, this might include a check.
It's a pretty straightforward process.  The only real difference with fiction is that you often don't do the sample chapters.  Publishing of any work, fiction or non-fiction, should take about a year or so after the book is submitted.

Do you have an agent?  Do you have a publisher?
---
[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman

[ Parent ]
Scroll down the thread by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #31 Tue Aug 10, 2010 at 04:06:18 PM EST
Here's where it gets really lame. He's now pretending that I've actually unknowingly reviewed two of his books. Except that the only possible candidates have author photos, make PR appearances, and don't look anything like him. And he can't explain why his unsuccessful vanity-published and web fiction is under his own name, but he's had to hide the successful stuff under a pseudonym.
--
It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?
[ Parent ]
I guess, computer books really by Writer In Residence (2.00 / 0) #32 Tue Aug 10, 2010 at 04:22:43 PM EST
have a different process. Academic books tend to linger about. Nice try, though.


[ Parent ]
Actually by ucblockhead (2.00 / 0) #33 Tue Aug 10, 2010 at 04:42:22 PM EST
They don't have a different process at all.

Do you have an agent?
---
[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman

[ Parent ]
Since you've never published one, how could you by Writer In Residence (2.00 / 0) #34 Tue Aug 10, 2010 at 07:50:52 PM EST
possibly know? They most certainly do.

See, here's how publishing your quickly useless shit works: You tell the publisher that you know how to explain how some obscure computer bullshit works and then that say that they will publish you because they have no fucking idea what you are talking about. In the world of real books, non-fiction books, have to get rights to certain things and then publish and that takes time.

Sorry to dawn the light on the fact that your extended pamphlets are not actually literature.


[ Parent ]
Heh by ucblockhead (2.00 / 0) #35 Tue Aug 10, 2010 at 07:57:28 PM EST
Given the number of author blogs people around here read, you pretty much look like a tool here.
---
[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
[ Parent ]
I look like a tool because I don't bow down to by Writer In Residence (2.00 / 0) #36 Tue Aug 10, 2010 at 08:02:56 PM EST
the cult of the polite computer-using person. I actually have an opinion and it's not always popular, unlike most of you. Nonetheless, you clearly speak about that for which you know nothing. And let's face it, most people here are not bright enough to read non-fiction. Made up stories by over-weight Husiites are all they can handle.

Thanks for getting back to me so quick. It almost feels like that movie 'You've Got Mail!.'


[ Parent ]
Hah by ucblockhead (2.00 / 0) #37 Tue Aug 10, 2010 at 08:07:05 PM EST
UR FUNNY.

But seriously...trying posting a believable troll, not something that makes you look like a fat bastard in a basement.

The book publishing industry isn't an "opinion" and given that writers like to...well...write, there's no end of people, even non-fiction writers, writing lots about how publishing actually works.
---
[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman

[ Parent ]
Isn't it funny how so many of them are like you by Writer In Residence (2.00 / 0) #38 Thu Sep 30, 2010 at 02:14:18 PM EST
and equate instruction manuals with writing? It would make IKEA the most prolific publisher ever if that were true...


[ Parent ]
More printed per year than the bible. by ambrosen (2.00 / 0) #39 Thu Sep 30, 2010 at 06:18:18 PM EST


[ Parent ]
We'll be together for a thousand years | 39 comments (39 topical, 0 hidden)