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By ucblockhead (Sat Sep 29, 2018 at 05:03:08 PM EST) (all tags)
Perhaps I'm in denial


My parents were 24 when I was born.  I was 37 when I had my son.  Yet I often feel I have more in common, and have more sympathy with his generation than my parents.  For instance, the idea of me sitting down and having a discussion with my mom about a game or a movie and it being a real, actual conversation seems silly.  Yet I do this with my boy all the time.

I was thinking of this after I went to see Foo Fighters with my son, a friend of his, and the friend's dad.  We were all there and basically enjoyed the show.  The crowd was half millennials, half middle-aged guys like me and the other dad.  There wasn't a baby-boomer in sight.

Closest I can remember was when I saw Deep Purple as a teenager...but there, it was all boomers with a smattering of people my age.

I know the original "Generation Gap" was between the boomers and their parents...but now, it seems to me, the real gap is a line that runs right around a high school graduation of 1980.

Of course, I could well be full of it, in entire denial like so many of the "old" people were when I was a kid.

< Late September Update
Generation gaps | 19 comments (19 topical, 0 hidden)
There were a couple bands ... by lm (4.00 / 1) #1 Sat Sep 29, 2018 at 06:28:47 PM EST
... that me and my parents both liked like early Beatles and Pete Seeger.

But there's probably far more musical overlap between me and my daughters.

Funny thing, though. Both of my daughters are are big into show tunes which gives them a lot of overlap with my mom.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
Yeah by ucblockhead (2.00 / 0) #2 Sat Sep 29, 2018 at 06:53:44 PM EST
The Venn diagram with my parent's music has some small overlap.  But with my boy (other than, coincidentally, show tunes) much of what he listens to is stuff that I either owned on CD back in the day or am happy to listen to now.
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[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
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Generation X, let alone "Y" by Scrymarch (4.00 / 1) #3 Sun Sep 30, 2018 at 08:04:36 AM EST
Seems to have disappeared from demographic commentary as filtered through pop culature. Now there is another bump generation coming through, it's just boomers vs millenials all the way, Gen X mostly folded in as "kids these days", just as it hits an age for political power.

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Aren't the Gen Xers in their 40s now? by iGrrrl (4.00 / 1) #4 Sun Sep 30, 2018 at 08:42:35 AM EST
Even the Millennials are full adults, the leading edge solidly in their 30s.

"Beautiful wine, talking of scattered everythings"
(and thanks to Scrymarch)

[ Parent ]
Yeah by ucblockhead (4.00 / 1) #6 Sun Sep 30, 2018 at 01:27:15 PM EST
At 53, I'm technically the  oldest of the GenXers...though that feels a few years off to me.
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[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
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I'm neither by iGrrrl (2.00 / 0) #11 Sun Sep 30, 2018 at 09:30:28 PM EST
Too young for Baby Boom and too old for GenX

"Beautiful wine, talking of scattered everythings"
(and thanks to Scrymarch)

[ Parent ]
Similar by me0w (4.00 / 1) #13 Mon Oct 01, 2018 at 06:35:57 AM EST
I fall in the gap between Gen X and Millenials. I think some are calling us 'Generation Oregon Trail'.



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Not dead of dysentery! by iGrrrl (4.00 / 1) #16 Mon Oct 01, 2018 at 09:20:01 PM EST
Great. Now I want pixellated strategy games.

"Beautiful wine, talking of scattered everythings"
(and thanks to Scrymarch)

[ Parent ]
Or the youngest of the Boomers. by wiredog (2.00 / 0) #15 Mon Oct 01, 2018 at 10:33:47 AM EST
Culturally I seem to be a Boomer at 53.

Earth First!
(We can strip mine the rest later.)

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It's weird. by ObviousTroll (2.00 / 0) #19 Tue Oct 02, 2018 at 02:49:37 PM EST
 I'm in that exact same gap - 53, old enough to have experienced the final, flickering, dissipation of the Age of Aquarius but I've never felt even a small connection with the boomers. My parents always had more in common with Richie Cunningham than Laugh In, and I went from listening to their doo-wop (and Mom's show tunes, interestingly enough) straight into New Wave and the dawn of MTV.

An Angry and Flatulent Pig, Trying to Tie Balloon Animals
[ Parent ]
Gen X by Merekat (4.00 / 3) #8 Sun Sep 30, 2018 at 02:28:08 PM EST
Have been up to their eyeballs holding down jobs, trying to get mortgages etc. in waves of boom and bust. The ones who made it have surviorship bias and are stealth boomers. Those who have not are millennial with more saggy bits.

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Calling me "stealth boomer"!? by ucblockhead (4.00 / 2) #10 Sun Sep 30, 2018 at 09:25:46 PM EST
Them's fighting words ;-)
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[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
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Well by Merekat (4.00 / 3) #12 Mon Oct 01, 2018 at 02:36:52 AM EST
I have a boomer mortgage and car, but millenial wardrobe and angst:)

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Parenting is different, music less so by iGrrrl (4.00 / 1) #5 Sun Sep 30, 2018 at 08:47:00 AM EST
Expectations about parent-child relationships are different. My dad was WWII generation, and children were to be seen but not heard. Our thoughts or opinions weren't wanted while the grownups were talking, or maybe ever.

Also, for a few years after WWII, each generation had a musical style (I'm thinking mostly of middle class white culture). The rock music of the 60s was such a radical departure from big band and swing and popular song from the 30s-40s. Hiphop was a very radical difference, but a lot of top 40 music now could easily have been popular in the 80s. 

"Beautiful wine, talking of scattered everythings"
(and thanks to Scrymarch)

I do see that by ucblockhead (4.00 / 1) #7 Sun Sep 30, 2018 at 01:31:04 PM EST
When I look at music made by "kids", it's all over the map, of all different genres.  I can't think of a real genre created over the last ten years or so.  It feels like pop culture has now entirely explored the ranges of what musical technology can do.

My parents are technically part of the WWII generation...they were born in 1940.  But they often acted somewhat like boomers, somewhat not...not being entirely in touch with the "hippie" movement, but having sympathy for it.  They gave lip service to not being part of the "seen and not heard" thing, but often didn't entirely walk that walk.
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[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman

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Silent Generation by StackyMcRacky (2.00 / 0) #14 Mon Oct 01, 2018 at 09:32:26 AM EST
that's what my parents are as well, but my mom is the oldest of 6 and most of the rest are solid boomers (obviously not her twin) so she identifies as a boomer.  I'm told people in those last/early years of a generation identify more with one or another based on siblings/playmates.

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friendship across the ages by aphrael (2.00 / 0) #9 Sun Sep 30, 2018 at 08:58:06 PM EST
i have way more friends in their 20s than i do in their 50s, let alone their 60s.

but when i went to desert trip with a crew of people in their 20s, 30s, and 40s, most of the crowd was in their 60s, and that crowd felt like my people, regardless of their age.
If television is a babysitter, the internet is a drunk librarian who won't shut up.

Generations are bullshit by marvin (2.00 / 0) #17 Mon Oct 01, 2018 at 11:23:23 PM EST
You'd likely enjoy hanging out with a group of 60-ish boomers who were slightly too young for Woodstock and are still sad about it, but would probably avoid their peers who attended West Point and have voted republican their entire lives. Same with millenial 30-somethings who think Burning Man is a great time - compare them to similarly aged scumbags who preach the red pill nonsense and watch infowars.

Our local land development lobby group brought in a former real estate marketer as a luncheon speaker last year. His newest book comes out Oct 9 showing how useless it is to divide people into generations. It was a pretty good presentation.

His past books partially served as business development for his firm, so apply an appropriately sized grain of salt to everything. Trust, but verify. The methodology looks decent to me (a non-statistician, non-social-scientist, which is not saying much), but you don't get to dig under the hood either, or send his data set out for third party analysis.

A co-worker of mine received an advance copy of the book a month ago, and I expect to end up getting a hardcopy when it is released. It makes a lot of sense to group people the way he described in the presentation I heard back when he first started writing this book, and I expect to find it a lot more useful to explain people than the age-based boomer / genx/ millenial classification system.

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I've noticed the same thing by MillMan (2.00 / 0) #18 Tue Oct 02, 2018 at 12:04:12 PM EST
My guess is that inter-generational expectations have changed more than a broadening in how people of different ages experience and process the world. To my parents (early boomers born right after the war), my world was just assumed to be mostly alien, and they left it at that. I don't start from that assumption, so it doesn't get in the way. As much as the world feels fucked, there is definitely a softening in the rigidity of cultural roles (age, gender, sexuality) going on.

Superficially it probably helps that I was on the internet at a young-ish age, and consume culture somewhat similarly to how young people do. Instead of channel surfing in the evening I'm off watching "weird ASMR videos" on youtube.

"Just as there are no atheists in foxholes, there are no libertarians in financial crises." -Krugman

Generation gaps | 19 comments (19 topical, 0 hidden)