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The Oresteia


The Oresteia
Were the ancient Greeks really entertained by this? Enquiring minds really want to know. Originally written around 458BC, it seems a little dated. The acting and speech seemed a little wooden, and the combination of modern and ancient dress in this production didn't come off well. I think if you're going to do this, you need to make free with the script and sit firmly on one side or the other of ancient/ modern dress and setting.

So I went to see this at The Globe, a massive 5 minute walk from where I work. Unfortunately it seems that City airport also took it into their heads to launch or land planes at inconvenient moments.

Remember people, if you're going to sit for 3+ hours in a building where some windows are missing, wear warm clothing and get a cushion to prevent bum numbness.

I could say that all I got was this lousy t-shirt, but I quite like it.
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The Play's the thing | 3 comments (3 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
I'm impressed by TheophileEscargot (4.00 / 1) #1 Thu Oct 22, 2015 at 12:53:26 AM EST
I love the Globe, and I've seen a few ancient Greek plays, and I'd probably have thought that was a bit heavy for me...

Were they entertained by it? Probably. But Greek theatre was part of an annual religious ceremony, the festival of Dionysus, so it was a religious obligation, not something they chose to do for fun in the evenings.
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It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?

Globe and Playhouse by anonimouse (4.00 / 1) #2 Thu Oct 22, 2015 at 05:22:42 AM EST
 CG is doing a drama/literature degree at a London university and watching this was required but I like theatre anyway. I'm currently on track to watch about 60% of the plays in her course. After the Oresteia she was begging me to take her out to a musical next  .

I like The Globe and the Playhouse, just not this performance. Apparently this play wasn't part of a religious festival but a competition winner. I think that there is a play that would be enjoyed by a modern audience if someone had put together a better production

Girls come and go but a mortgage is for 25 years -- JtL
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Modern audiences by TheophileEscargot (4.00 / 1) #3 Fri Oct 23, 2015 at 12:44:27 AM EST
I saw "The Lightning Child", a very loose adaptation of "The Bacchae" at the Globe a while ago, and that was fantasically entertaining. The audience loved it, were laughing and screaming. But that had a lot of changes, including a long speech about Internet porn that I'm pretty sure wasn't in the original. I think it's hard to do it faithfully and keep it entertaining, there are too many cultural changes.

The theatre part of the festival of Dionysus was a play competition, so I think the few plays that survived tended to be competition winners. The ancient Greeks were ultra competitive ("agonistic") and had competitions everywhere. The Olympic games were part of a religious festival, at a funeral they would have "funeral games" with athletic competitions.
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It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?

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The Play's the thing | 3 comments (3 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback