Print Story Thinking of ditching scoop
Scoop
By hulver (Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 05:18:23 AM EST) (all tags)
The server move isn't going well.


We're still running on the old server.

I've not been able to pummel scoop into working fashion on the new machine.

I've just not touched Apache / Perl / Linux for so long, and installing scoop isn't an easy thing at the best of times.

Looks like I'm going to have to ditch the easy options and go for building Apache 1 from source like I did originally in order to get HuSi running on the new server.

Long term though, I might just ditch scoop altogether and maybe move to some other forum software.

Being super busy at work doesn't help either.

< My fins are gone | I was an agent for three years before I found out that all models were aliens >
Thinking of ditching scoop | 69 comments (69 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
The other day a problem came up at work by lm (2.00 / 0) #1 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 06:45:05 AM EST
And I thought to myself, 'hmm. this would take 5 minutes or less in Perl'.

Then I started thinking about all the hours of headache that I'd have to go through to get a properly functioning Perl installation.

Even if a Perl solution could be gotten past management, which is doubtful, it'd eat up more time than i would save.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
DWIM Perl is fairly quick and not so dirty. by dark nowhere (2.00 / 0) #3 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 06:57:55 AM EST
But if mgmt is against it it's not worth the fight unless you really need it. People really hate Perl these days.

Chill out, snowflake.

[ Parent ]
That's probably because by gmd (4.00 / 1) #22 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 06:59:14 PM EST
 It's well known that Python is the better language.

--
gmd - HuSi's second most dimwitted overprivileged user.
[ Parent ]
Yes, but.... by marvin (4.00 / 3) #25 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 07:07:03 PM EST
that was a comparison against Pearl. Did you mean to link to another article perhaps?

[ Parent ]
Points for Adequacy. by dark nowhere (4.00 / 2) #27 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 11:09:50 PM EST
Just yesterday I caught two people talking like Python invented .ini files—renewing my faith in my rule against participating on Reddit (where the answer to "what are you, twelve?" is "probably, lol.") So I'm used to hearing that from a certain class of people, who mean it like they mean sigils are an affront to God.

But yeah, Adequacy does it right. I mean I wish I could train a clone to take Adequacy literally so I could laugh at clone-me going all nerd-psychotic over it. It would be like watching Archer IRL or something.

Chill out, snowflake.

[ Parent ]
I've spent ten years or so by riceowlguy (2.00 / 0) #26 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 11:00:59 PM EST
getting pretty good at Perl on Linux.  But everybody seems to hate it, so I'm forcing myself to switch to Python.

I think Python appeals to people who want to feel like they are writing in "a real programming language" and not a shell scripting language.

[ Parent ]
"Switch to" by dark nowhere (2.00 / 0) #28 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 11:42:08 PM EST
is disturbing language. I think a real problem here is that people have to have one language, and they have to cognitive-dissonate themselves into believing it's the single-best option, and if not so in all universes, at the very least in their corner.

I do recommend learning Python, in fact I recommend learning any language you find yourself interested in and have the time to learn. I write (much) better Perl because of OCaml, Scheme and Io. I write Better Io because of Perl 6 and of what little I know of Haskell. I write better Javascript because of Scheme and Io. I learned to know and love monads from Javascript (due to async DOM interaction.) I write better Rust because of all of the above.

I still can't write Lua or Python in a comfortable way. For Python other people's code disagrees with me too. I haven't read a lot of Lua code. I think metatables are wrong and I never figured out how to do assignment (of all things!) properly.

Chill out, snowflake.

[ Parent ]
I take your broader point by lm (2.00 / 0) #30 Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 05:34:15 AM EST
But, in context, problems get solved in different systems. Sometimes introducing a different language to that system has a far higher cost than benefit.

There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
(Comment Deleted) by dark nowhere (2.00 / 0) #31 Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 06:33:06 AM EST

This comment has been deleted by dark nowhere



[ Parent ]
Oops. by dark nowhere (2.00 / 0) #32 Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 06:37:42 AM EST
You must have been referring to the situation in your top-level comment.

Yeah, if you have one little thing you want to do in a different language and nothing else it's not going to be worth it.

Chill out, snowflake.

[ Parent ]
OO by ucblockhead (2.00 / 0) #39 Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 07:46:11 PM EST
I think Python is for people who like traditional OO.  It often seems as if Python is the favorite of C++ programmers who want a quick scripting language.
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[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
[ Parent ]
I think... by ana (2.00 / 0) #41 Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 10:09:31 PM EST
 I need an intro to OO programming, using numpy/python as the language of choice. I end up spending way too much of my time cussing at it, and then beating it into a form where I can write fortran in it.

I now know what the noise that is usually spelled "lolwhut" sounds like. --Kellnerin

[ Parent ]
Coursera has a decent OO Python class by lm (2.00 / 0) #42 Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 10:42:01 PM EST
My wife took it about a year ago. She had fun. I don't know when they'll be offering it next but it might be worthwhile to keep an eye on it if you want to pick up Python.

There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
Skip numpy by ucblockhead (2.00 / 0) #44 Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 11:57:12 PM EST
If you want to learn OO, numpy is just a distraction.
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[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
[ Parent ]
Can't. by ana (2.00 / 0) #47 Fri Jun 27, 2014 at 07:16:16 AM EST
The local gurus have put together a database with All The Things in it, and a python API which hands you a numpy structure of some kind or other.

Cue the "You can't do that with one of these" error messages that I can't otherwise read.

I now know what the noise that is usually spelled "lolwhut" sounds like. --Kellnerin

[ Parent ]
idk what 'traditional OO' is. by dark nowhere (2.00 / 0) #43 Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 11:15:13 PM EST
I recognize a lot of people think it's C++ but others would say Smalltalk. I guess the current tradition is C++/Java. The Ruby folks are holding a torch for Smalltalk though.

Prototype-OO languages, on the other hand, really work for me. "Fluent style" is the best fashion to happen to dynamic OO and it promotes separating the logic well (e.g. map instead of for loops for transforming data) and is conducive to functional techniques.

Chill out, snowflake.

[ Parent ]
I need to try others by ucblockhead (2.00 / 0) #45 Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 11:59:32 PM EST
JavaScript seems cool in theory but I've never seen a large JavaScript app that wasn't a huge disorganized mess.  (And I've seen a lot of JavaScript apps.)

I've been a fan of a more functional style, but that seems easier in Python than JavaScript.
---
[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman

[ Parent ]
Javascript has problems. by dark nowhere (2.00 / 0) #54 Fri Jun 27, 2014 at 09:38:01 AM EST
It adds like children: on a good day, 2+2 is 4, otherwise it's 22. (You might be able to fix that with prototypes but I haven't tried.) It's syntax is awful, and it's obvious why: Eich was told to make Scheme look like Java.

Python's lamdba problem sorta ruins functional style for me. You can transliterate Scheme to JS, but not to Python. But that's me, when I go functional I lose patience if I can't go higher-order while I'm at it.

Chill out, snowflake.

[ Parent ]
It is smalltalk for sure. by gmd (4.00 / 1) #46 Fri Jun 27, 2014 at 03:35:50 AM EST
 C++ is a multi-paradigm language, one of which is 'object orientation' but smalltalk is a 'pure' object oriented language. Literally everything is an object in smalltalk,

--
gmd - HuSi's second most dimwitted overprivileged user.
[ Parent ]
As opposed to python by wumpus (2.00 / 0) #50 Fri Jun 27, 2014 at 08:43:49 AM EST
where almost* everything is an object**. It never forces you to make classes/objects, though. You can use OO when you are familiar enough with the language.

Wumpus

* I forgot the exceptions, but I think even integers act as objects.

** This makes "pickle" (a routine for globbing up data into files/datastreams) extremely unsafe. If you unpickle data from a random stranger over the internet, a+=1 could well install nasty code due to either "a" or even "1" overloading the __add__ method.

[ Parent ]
Well by riceowlguy (2.00 / 0) #58 Sat Jun 28, 2014 at 10:26:21 AM EST
What I meant was that, since I knew I would never make the time outside of work hours to sit down and learn Python, I decided that whenever I had a script to write at work that I knew I could do in ten minutes in Perl, I would take the 30-60 minutes or so it takes me to do it in Python.  That's not a knock on Python, it's just that I haven't internalized the syntax rules yet and find myself having to Google things far more often than I would when writing in Perl.

This is a worthwhile investment of time at work since when I said "it seems like everybody hates Perl", I meant "all of the most influential technical people at my company hate Perl and I've specifically been called out in the past for using it."

At this point I've gotten enough basic Python down that it's probably a toss-up as long as I'm mostly calling out to subprocess.check_call for most of the heavy lifting, at which point you might argue I should just be using bash, but bash control flow syntax just drives me insane.  If I was trying to do anything involving parsing input I would probably really really wish I was still writing in Perl.

About a year ago I actually went through the exercise of rewriting a Perl program we had that had  a good mixture of the things our code tends to do - XML parsing, custom config file format parsing and re-writing, HTTP RESTful API interactions - in both Python and Ruby to get a sense of what would be "the best", taking into account things like how well documented it was, how easy (or not) it was to add new libraries to a Linux distro through "official channels", etc.  There really wasn't a clear winner.  I actually liked Ruby a lot but it's the least-well supported as far as Linux distro packages and documentation goes.  I don't think too many people use Ruby outside of the Rails universe.


[ Parent ]
I get called out a lot. by dark nowhere (2.00 / 0) #60 Sat Jun 28, 2014 at 06:26:09 PM EST
I have never been called out for writing Perl by someone who's ever used a compiler though... and I've never had a programming gig where I didn't use a compiled language to solve an important problem at some point.

It does help if your codebase uses the same languages for the same kinds of things. I don't know what your situation is. If nobody else on the team knew Perl I would write something they could understand if applicable.

Chill out, snowflake.

[ Parent ]
re: hating perl by infinitera (2.00 / 0) #57 Sat Jun 28, 2014 at 09:39:22 AM EST
I forget now where I saw this blog post linked from this week, but:

http://outspeaking.com/words-of-technology/why-perl-didnt-win.html

[…] a professional layabout. Which I aspire to be, but am not yet. — CheeseburgerBrown

[ Parent ]
I've seen that by dark nowhere (4.00 / 1) #59 Sat Jun 28, 2014 at 05:49:41 PM EST
but its arguments are pretty bad.

People do still express CPAN envy, and it's not like their examples of things you probably won't find in CPAN have any weight. Perl's DB support was phenomenal in 1999, and used as an example of great design in coming years, and still is here and there. I still distrust ORM support, but DBIx was around. And still is. I wish it would die. Most importantly it's not 1999 any more and Perl brought frameworks before Ruby, the framework programming language, showed up, or before JS frameworks were a thing people thought about. I mean people stood in awe of Catalyst, but that's not where things ended.

I was doing payment processing in 1999 with Perl. Not with Stripe because it didn't exist in 1999, but it exists today. I mean the author could have at least cherry-picked some examples that actually support the claim.

There's a lot more in the analysis that just doesn't track. TPF isn't lazy. The timeline is missing things—things people using Perl actually complain about are not represented. Perl 6 was problematic, but I don't think it stopped anyone employable from writing Perl.

I don't know exactly what happened to Perl. I know this isn't it. Nobody ever complains that Perl 5 has lacked function signatures until just this year. If one really knew what was wrong with Perl they would bring that up pretty quick.

Chill out, snowflake.

[ Parent ]
wow, that article would've been a lot better by the mariner (4.00 / 1) #61 Sat Jun 28, 2014 at 06:42:47 PM EST
if it had mentioned perl 6 in the first paragraph and had only one paragraph.

[ Parent ]
ASP.Net FTW! by wiredog (2.00 / 0) #2 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 06:45:44 AM EST
I'm sure you'll have no trouble getting IIS up and running, and MS will be more than happy to help you migrate from MySql to SQL Server.

Earth First!
(We can strip mine the rest later.)

Something different could be good. by dark nowhere (4.00 / 1) #4 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 07:03:27 AM EST
But I still hate all forum software. What's out there that's comparable to Scoop?

I would also like to express a desire for Markdown support.

Chill out, snowflake.

reddit's software... by gzt (2.00 / 0) #10 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 10:56:34 AM EST
...seems nice. not sure how it is to work iwth on the software side.

[ Parent ]
Could do worse. by dark nowhere (2.00 / 0) #11 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 12:04:30 PM EST
The biggest problem I see is retrofitting it (or nearly anything) for the journal+section thing we have going on. Maybe that's not seen as important, but I'd put it above nested comments.

Everywhere else I post has flat comment threads, and I've found it promotes conversation better. I actually like the StackOverflow style, flat threading under each toplevel comment (but I'd scale up the font size on child comments.)

I have a few gripes with Reddit. Text posts have ugly bodies. I think that could be fixed up a lot with styles, but I'm not sure how good it gets. I've never seen a subreddit that makes text posts attractive. (If you know of any good examples I'd like to see them for curiosity's sake.) Another problem is the formatting is done by one of those kinda-sorta-markdown formatters. I wish Markdown was well-specified and had spectests from day 1. I don't think either has come to pass.

Chill out, snowflake.

[ Parent ]
I don't think retrofitting would be too bad by gzt (2.00 / 0) #14 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 01:51:39 PM EST
I mean, you get rid of the "front page" (or not) and you have, essentially, three "sub-husis", two are private and one of them gets purged regularly.

[ Parent ]
and for text posts... by gzt (2.00 / 0) #15 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 01:54:29 PM EST
...i don't know that it's much worse than here.

as much as i dislike "less wrong", and they actually make things uglier than reddit, they have modified reddit code to fit their needs, if you're looking for another site based on the software.

[ Parent ]
Uglier than Reddit? by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #18 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 03:21:42 PM EST
The mind reels.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
reddit is at least... by gzt (2.00 / 0) #19 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 04:33:45 PM EST
...somewhat "clean" in its design.

[ Parent ]
hopefully archive today's site somewhere/somehow? by clover kicker (4.00 / 1) #5 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 07:25:16 AM EST
Forum software seems to be heading in the wrong direction, the ability to show nested comments is even less common today than back when Scoop was written.

There's a lot of PHPBB out there but holy fuck PHP?

The easy way out might be creating a new subreddit.

IAWTP Re: Archiving by miserere (4.00 / 1) #9 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 10:31:56 AM EST
I definitely don't want to lose the stuff we've all posted over the years. I suppose I could figure out a way to retrieve all of my stuff, but having it archived would be awesome.

And many, many thanks to hulver for giving us this space.

[ Parent ]
dear lord, a subreddit? by gzt (4.00 / 1) #37 Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 11:13:19 AM EST
no no no, make our own site using reddit software, i don't want world collision.

[ Parent ]
PHPBB by Herring (4.00 / 2) #40 Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 09:48:21 PM EST
Fuck no.

I have inherited a PHPBB setup and I hate it. I don't have the technical nous to move it to something nicer though.

christ, we're all old now - StackyMcRacky

[ Parent ]
Get a consultant by anonimouse (2.00 / 0) #48 Fri Jun 27, 2014 at 08:30:57 AM EST
My rates are very extortionate reasonable. 

Girls come and go but a mortgage is for 25 years -- JtL
[ Parent ]
You can have the gig by Herring (2.00 / 0) #62 Mon Jun 30, 2014 at 06:37:21 PM EST
for 75% of what the guy who runs the club (me) gets per hour.

christ, we're all old now - StackyMcRacky
[ Parent ]
But by anonimouse (2.00 / 0) #64 Tue Jul 01, 2014 at 02:25:03 AM EST
I can't work for £3/hour!!


Girls come and go but a mortgage is for 25 years -- JtL
[ Parent ]
That's allotta squids/hour. by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #65 Wed Jul 02, 2014 at 11:50:49 PM EST

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
The person who wrote the book... by ana (2.00 / 0) #6 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 08:04:10 AM EST
 on installing scoop might be available for consulting.

I now know what the noise that is usually spelled "lolwhut" sounds like. --Kellnerin

There's a book on Installing Scoop by anonimouse (2.00 / 0) #20 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 05:08:51 PM EST
I thought the only person who knew anything about it was Rusty and anyone who worked on Daily Kos.


Girls come and go but a mortgage is for 25 years -- JtL
[ Parent ]
Doesn't Captain Tenille have an account here? by marvin (2.00 / 0) #21 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 06:14:17 PM EST
He was involved with DailyKos, wasn't he?

[ Parent ]
yeah by MillMan (2.00 / 0) #29 Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 02:23:36 AM EST
They switched from scoop like...6 years ago? Maybe more?

"Just as there are no atheists in foxholes, there are no libertarians in financial crises." -Krugman

[ Parent ]
2011 by anonimouse (2.00 / 0) #33 Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 06:53:25 AM EST
"Only" 3 years ago 

Girls come and go but a mortgage is for 25 years -- JtL
[ Parent ]
Since dKos migrated by anonimouse (2.00 / 0) #34 Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 06:54:56 AM EST
 Would they let us have dKos v4 which I presume is Scoop compatible...

Girls come and go but a mortgage is for 25 years -- JtL
[ Parent ]
yes by aphrael (2.00 / 0) #36 Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 07:56:19 AM EST
Yurp. by Captain Tenille (4.00 / 3) #38 Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 01:35:33 PM EST
It's been a while since I've had to do a Scoop install, mind, but I'd certainly be willing to take a crack at installing it somewhere.

I do have the Apache 2.x compatible Scoop branch as well, although I don't remember off the top of my head what db changes are necessary to make it work. 

---------

/* You are not expected to understand this. */


[ Parent ]
Any chance you can send that to me? by hulver (2.00 / 0) #67 Fri Jul 04, 2014 at 06:11:35 AM EST
Running on 1.3 makes me uncomfortable. Thanks.
--
Cheese is not a hat. - clock
[ Parent ]
I have a github repo with it. by Captain Tenille (2.00 / 0) #68 Sun Jul 06, 2014 at 01:16:58 PM EST
That's over here: https://github.com/ctdk/scoop-dk

That's some version of the Daily Kos Scoop, towards the end of its run (with a few non-relevant parts snipped out). I'm not sure it's worth your while to try and use it directly, though; there were a lot of changes made to make it run at scale that aren't really worth it for you, I think, and would just be a bit of a headache. The most important stuff's the Apache 2.x changes, which I think are mostly concentrated in lib/Scoop/ApacheHandler.pm. I don't remember exactly what the changes necessary were, but while they aren't exactly trivial they aren't the end of the world either. You might want to diff it against the vanilla Scoop sources and see what pops out. There are also db changes that would have to be dug up to make some of the stuff in there work directly.

If you really really want it, I can try and find those, but I don't think you'd actually benefit much from any of it. 

---------

/* You are not expected to understand this. */


[ Parent ]
THE END IS NIGH by the mariner (4.00 / 2) #7 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 08:04:44 AM EST


christ, we're all old now. by StackyMcRacky (4.00 / 25) #8 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 09:27:25 AM EST


FYI by dark nowhere (4.00 / 3) #13 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 01:16:14 PM EST
Your post prompted me to turn comment rating back on.


Chill out, snowflake.

[ Parent ]
I think by StackyMcRacky (4.00 / 1) #49 Fri Jun 27, 2014 at 08:43:26 AM EST
that was my highest rated comment ever.

[ Parent ]
I didn't realise.. by anonimouse (4.00 / 3) #52 Fri Jun 27, 2014 at 09:15:11 AM EST
...there were 18 19 people still active to vote.,

Girls come and go but a mortgage is for 25 years -- JtL
[ Parent ]
Congratulations! by dark nowhere (2.00 / 0) #55 Fri Jun 27, 2014 at 09:40:59 AM EST
You won HuSi!

Chill out, snowflake.

[ Parent ]
Aargh, sounds like a nightmare by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #12 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 12:24:11 PM EST
Thanks for all this work. Yep, move it to anything else that's easier.

Doubt there's anything that has Scoop's exact set of features. I think the only necessary one is a Hole/Whine Cellar equivalent. Don't think we really need comment ratings or nested comments these days. Could do without pictures and polls if necessary.
--
It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?

some sort of nesting by gzt (4.00 / 2) #16 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 01:56:13 PM EST
completely flat doesn't really work well if you have more than 2 different conversations going. the stack-overflow-esque idea would probably be fine at this volume of commentary, though.

[ Parent ]
sic transit gloria husi by gzt (4.00 / 2) #17 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 02:59:22 PM EST


Just a thought.. by gmd (4.00 / 4) #23 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 07:04:11 PM EST
 Could you virtualise the existing server? Maybe run it on virtualbox? Faced with legacy nightmares, this is a fairly common approach...

--
gmd - HuSi's second most dimwitted overprivileged user.
This is the saddest thing I've heard all day. by atreides (4.00 / 2) #24 Wed Jun 25, 2014 at 07:04:23 PM EST
:(

He sails from world to world in a flying tomb, serving gods who eat hope.

The current cool kid on the block by Dr Thrustgood (4.00 / 2) #35 Thu Jun 26, 2014 at 07:51:18 AM EST
Appears to be Discourse:

http://www.discourse.org

Rails + Redis + Postgres

For the archive, I'd be tempted to create a really shitty-yet-functional hack:

1. Create archive using wget --mirror -p --html-extension --convert-links http://example.com

Plan A:

  1. Write a shitty PHP login system using the existing auth credentials.
  2. Write a shitty PHP script that puts some session checking at the top of every HTML page.
Plan B:
  1. Put the archive in a non-user-accessible location on the server
  2. Every HTML page request, route to a framework that checks logins, and if valid, reads the HTML file and spits it out. Shitty but easy.
Finally:
  1. Stick it on archive.hulver.com
  2. PROFIT
I don't have oodles of time at the moment, but could potentially put something like this together in an evening for you.



Migrate the data by anonimouse (2.00 / 0) #51 Fri Jun 27, 2014 at 08:52:42 AM EST
It should not be beyond possibility to migrate users, articles and comments to Discourse.
AFAICT the main thing that would be an issue is comment rating

Girls come and go but a mortgage is for 25 years -- JtL
[ Parent ]
Agreed, data migration should be possible by Dr Thrustgood (4.00 / 1) #56 Fri Jun 27, 2014 at 09:48:08 AM EST
The question being: is it worth it?

My ETL experience is limited to Ab Initio and all kinds of crazy shit IBM codepage nightmares. I've seen some shit, man.

Due to the techie nature of its users, I'd be hugely surprised if some comments and diaries here didn't contain edge cases that'll make something unexpected happen, whether it's breaking entirely, or fucking up display.

That's all fine, data can be sanitised, and we'd eventually massage the data into a working model. It does, however, require way more time than it has any real right to do so.

That's why I'm suggesting a shitty-yet-doable job: it's guaranteed to get done, and it won't take an age for someone with extremely limited time (like the majority of us nowadays, it seems).



[ Parent ]
I've wondered about you and the site lately... by ObviousTroll (2.00 / 0) #53 Fri Jun 27, 2014 at 09:30:06 AM EST
My own site was primarily for my own extended family to talk to each other, but they've all moved to Facebook  so I've more or less killed it off.

Have you considered shifting to a different CMS? Drupal used to be great, but I haven't used a version newer than D6.


An Angry and Flatulent Pig, Trying to Tie Balloon Animals
Drupal has gotten better since D6 by dev trash (2.00 / 0) #63 Mon Jun 30, 2014 at 10:44:02 PM EST
I don't know if it's the right answer here though. Maybe it could be.  And if it is, I have Migration experience.

--
I DON'T CARE ABOUT YOUR BALLS! ->clock
[ Parent ]
If you do ditch Scoop by Orion Blastar (2.00 / 0) #66 Fri Jul 04, 2014 at 01:57:11 AM EST
you might want to make a static site of the current Scoop system like adeqacy.org did before it went down. That way people can read the posts and diaries that got made without losing anything.

Wordpress is very popular these days but it is more of a Blog than a Scoop site.

PHPBB has too many security holes in it, you'd be owned by hackers.

The Reddit engine is free and open source.

There is this Discuss thing.

I always wanted to write a Scoop clone named Scope that was in PHP or something, but been too sick to do so.

Recompiling Apache1 on a modern system is way to complex and hairy. Making Scoop work with Apache2 is very hard as well. Good luck.

P.S. Kuro5hin is down again, due to exploits in Scoop it goes down from time to time and they rebuild the server from a backup. Which takes a few days apparently. Expect some Kurons here.


"I drank what?" - Socrates after drinking the Conium
BTW by Orion Blastar (2.00 / 0) #69 Sat Jul 12, 2014 at 07:45:18 PM EST
I asked Hacker News if Scoop can be saved:

<a href="http://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=8026116">http://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=8026116</a>

If interested please vote it up and comment on it.


"I drank what?" - Socrates after drinking the Conium
Thinking of ditching scoop | 69 comments (69 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback