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By clover kicker (Fri Aug 30, 2013 at 05:49:06 PM EST) (all tags)
It feels kind of trivial compared to the stuff other people are posting about, but what the hell.

On playing Dwarf Fortress and Master of Magic.



Good Old Games had a sale a few weeks ago and I bought Master of Magic. I still have it on diskette somewhere but the GOG version is preconfigured with a properly tuned DOSBOX and for a couple of bucks, why not?

I spent many many hours on this back in the day and my god, it has held up extraordinarily well.

The graphics are horrible and the UI isn't great and the bugs are plentiful and the balance is nonexistant and the AI is beyond retarded but holy shit what a great game. I'm just finishing a romp with all-Life spellbook Halflings, I think my next one will be all-Death or maybe the unpredictable and whacky zero-spellbook mage.

MoM redone on a tablet would absolutely rock. I don't know if you'd turn a profit, the gaming community has derpified to a degree unimaginable in 1995.

On the other hand there remain glimmers of light, wee islands of hardcore gaming. I've been dabbling in Dwarf Fortress. Detailed? Cumbersome? Twisted? Insane? Addictive? Yes.

My first efforts ended in starvation or even worse, running out of alcohol.

I lost my last fortress to a goblin invasion.

My current fort is in trouble because one of my citizens is a secret vampire. Morale is suffering because of the murders, and I'm don't even like the way the fort layout turned out, I'm considering restarting.

Anyway if you're curious about DF I'd read this, http://lparchive.org/Dwarf-Fortress-Boatmurdered/

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games | 13 comments (13 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
MoM by ucblockhead (2.00 / 0) #1 Fri Aug 30, 2013 at 08:40:18 PM EST
I wish it ran on OSX.  I can never get the energy to reboot for a game.  The only thing that prevented that from being a great game (as opposed to a very good one) was the shitty AI. 
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[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
DOSbox supposedly runs on OSX by clover kicker (2.00 / 0) #4 Sat Aug 31, 2013 at 09:30:19 AM EST
Mind you I haven't tried it.

The AI is horrible and high difficulty is terribly cheaty, but there's so many things to try that I keep coming back.

[ Parent ]
Indeed it does by lm (2.00 / 0) #6 Sat Aug 31, 2013 at 05:15:41 PM EST
I had it running on my wife's computer for one reason or the other than I can no longer remember.

There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
Dwarf Fortress by Scrymarch (2.00 / 0) #2 Sat Aug 31, 2013 at 04:35:10 AM EST
Seems to be the game makers game, the richness of its barely visualised world, and the organic interactions and unintended side effects seem pretty cool. The commitment required has always put me off though - and it's like Tetris in that you always lose eventually?

Iambic Web Certified

once you get a handle on the mechanics by clover kicker (4.00 / 1) #3 Sat Aug 31, 2013 at 09:26:08 AM EST
it's possible to achieve stability.

You choose the fort location, a safe environment with proper resources should allow you to build up your economy and military/fortifications in time to deal with most enemy attacks.

As you delve deeper you'll breach caverns with successively nastier denizens. There's a lot of mineral wealth down there, but if you choose to avoid the caverns and play conservatively I'm told the limiting factor is that the game will bog down over time.

The game is ridiculous, if a dwarf wears out a socks and discards it, that sock is tracked for all time. A big, mature fort running over years of game time will eventually have such a low framerate that it's unplayable, "FPS death".

I'm still mastering the mechanics so FPS death is something I aspire to.

Once people get to that point they start embarking in more challenging locations, let's say on a glacier, middle of the desert, or just as bad in a saltwater swamp with no fresh water available, on the side of a volcano, just down the road from a necromancer tower, etc. etc.

As they say, "losing is fun".

[ Parent ]
not really. by the mariner (4.00 / 1) #5 Sat Aug 31, 2013 at 10:44:46 AM EST
it's not that hard to run a fortress that will survive as long as you care to supervise it.

[ Parent ]
grumps from a grumpy old man by wumpus (4.00 / 2) #7 Sat Aug 31, 2013 at 06:40:49 PM EST
"like tetris"

How about, "like every video game before the late-80s" (both arcade and ported for console/home computer, or home games "inspired by" coin op games). At least until about Dragon's Lair (first game I could think of that had the "insert coin[s] to continue").

Once upon a time, when most of Husi's graybeards were young, all video games worked like that. I suppose that such an attitude might go with graphics that require more imagination than your highly shaded AAAAA game (although it has been pointed out that stable games may indeed be possible. You can also play pac-man as long as you have memorized patters for enough levels (until you hit the kill screen)).

Wumpus

[ Parent ]
Amen by lm (4.00 / 1) #8 Sat Aug 31, 2013 at 09:02:36 PM EST
Winning a video game used to mean racking up enough points to cause a buffer overflow.

There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
Yeah by ucblockhead (2.00 / 0) #10 Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 02:47:06 PM EST
I still sometimes get annoyed when people talk about "finishing" a videogame.  When I was a lad, you didn't finish games.  You played them until you got tired of them.  (Or ran out of quarters.)
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[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
[ Parent ]
Hah by Scrymarch (2.00 / 0) #11 Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 08:44:48 PM EST
I am slightly too young to have the same visceral connection with this era of gaming, it's true .. However since the first computer game was Spacewar, from a decade or more earlier, the argument is doubly anachronistic. Since that is a straight win/loss game like tennis.

Iambic Web Certified

[ Parent ]
fundamental lack of AI by wumpus (4.00 / 1) #12 Mon Sep 02, 2013 at 11:54:30 PM EST
I'll admit that plenty of video games and similar were play versus player, at least up to around Space Invaders. Spacewar, Pong, some forgotten (western) gunslinger game: they all required two players (and one won). Also I'm pretty sure the original (Colossal Cave) adventure was from that time, and wiki puts the first release of Zork before Space Invaders as well. I would still claim that for what some might call the "golden age" of arcades (Space Invaders through either the collapse or possibly Street Fighter), "winning" met getting to a killscreen (buffer overflow).

Wumpus

[ Parent ]
I think by MillMan (2.00 / 0) #9 Sat Aug 31, 2013 at 09:13:02 PM EST
that was the first game that ever induced me to do an all nighter. I remember the hilariously bad AI and how the game was still fantastic.

"Just as there are no atheists in foxholes, there are no libertarians in financial crises." -Krugman

The question is.. by gmd (2.00 / 0) #13 Tue Sep 03, 2013 at 07:22:36 AM EST
 Do you play dwarf fortress at work?

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gmd - HuSi's second most dimwitted overprivileged user.
games | 13 comments (13 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback