Print Story When conspiracy theory collides with reality.
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By dmg (Thu Apr 18, 2013 at 08:02:14 PM EST) (all tags)
You may have detected from my previous diaries, that I am not a fan of government. That I seem to support so-called conspiracy theorists. Ant you might be right.

So what does the "awakened" traveller do when faced with the vaccination dilemma?



So I recently was fortunate enough to get made redundant, on terms which I am legally bound not to discuss.
As a result of this, I am planning some travel to include Africa, and South America. Which is all well and good, but if I am to stay alive, it seems I'm required to  undergo a series of vaccinations, including but not limited to  polio, typhoid, tetanus, hep A, yellow fever, and optionally rabies and hep B.

Now, I'm paranoid at the best of times, but one has to wonder, can this possibly be good for me?

Anyway after a long internal struggle, I came to the conclusion that the illuminati are probably not trying to kill me via contaminated vaccines so I got all my jabs.

Now I'm worried that I may have made the wrong call, and that even as we speak my pineal gland and immune system are under attack from Annunaki derived vaccine technology.

The real killer is, if that is the case, I will never know...

Also, rabies and hep B - does that seem like overkill to you?

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When conspiracy theory collides with reality. | 15 comments (15 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
i'm taking my daughter in for shots soon. by the mariner (4.00 / 1) #1 Thu Apr 18, 2013 at 09:03:23 PM EST
they keep telling me about this "human papillomavirus" vaccine they have that's supposed to be all the rage. apparently the idea is to prevent some obscure sexually transmitted disease! for an infant, no less!

i told them, thank you, no, i will leave my little girl's honor unbesmirched!

The rabies by marvin (4.00 / 1) #2 Thu Apr 18, 2013 at 09:10:58 PM EST
You'll be getting the vaccine too late, probably by about 12 years in your case, alas.

rabies by dev trash (2.00 / 0) #3 Thu Apr 18, 2013 at 10:52:27 PM EST
You're going to Africa, I assume not just to some city but out in the bush for an adventure.  There is no cure for rabies, and while I am sure you could get to somewhere to be treated for a bite.....why risk it.

Also it customary for those in the EU area to get such a large severance one can jet off to Africa?

--
I DON'T CARE ABOUT YOUR BALLS! ->clock

He has claimed to be involved in banking by anonimouse (2.00 / 0) #5 Fri Apr 19, 2013 at 05:59:29 AM EST
Look up UK banking severance packages in the news and weep


Girls come and go but a mortgage is for 25 years -- JtL
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I have friends out there. by dmg (2.00 / 0) #6 Fri Apr 19, 2013 at 08:11:53 AM EST
So it won't be very expensive.

Re: rabies as I understand it, the vaccine does not immunise completely, and you still have to get medical treatment within 24hrs or you will die. This seems to suggest that rabies vaccination is a bit pointless. Maybe I've misunderstood.
--
dmg - HuSi's most dimwitted overprivileged user.

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rabies by dev trash (2.00 / 0) #9 Fri Apr 19, 2013 at 06:18:50 PM EST
The duration of immunity afforded to humans by a two injection vaccination course was found to be between two to three years. Following administration of a booster dose (recommended at one year), one study found 97% of immuno-competent individuals demonstrate protective levels of neutralizing antibodies at 10 years

and then if exposed:

A person who has been previously vaccinated should get
2 doses of rabies vaccine - one right away and another
on the 3rd day. Rabies Immune Globulin is not needed.

So yeah looks like you'd still need medicine but not the RiG, which I assume would be harder to get than just a plain vaccine shot.


--
I DON'T CARE ABOUT YOUR BALLS! ->clock

[ Parent ]
So it boils down to a risk assessment by dmg (2.00 / 0) #10 Fri Apr 19, 2013 at 10:20:46 PM EST
4 weeks seems to be the threshold.

It would cost approx £150 for the rabies shots.

I think I will skip them.
 But what about the hep B?
--
dmg - HuSi's most dimwitted overprivileged user.

[ Parent ]
I'd get that one by dev trash (2.00 / 0) #11 Fri Apr 19, 2013 at 11:00:12 PM EST
Sure it's a blood/semen/saliva only transmission but it looks like protection is lifetime.

--
I DON'T CARE ABOUT YOUR BALLS! ->clock
[ Parent ]
You are really by anonimouse (2.00 / 0) #4 Fri Apr 19, 2013 at 03:40:32 AM EST
(Sir) James Crosby and I claim my £5


Girls come and go but a mortgage is for 25 years -- JtL
Hey, I received all of those by ammoniacal (4.00 / 2) #7 Fri Apr 19, 2013 at 08:53:28 AM EST
and look how I turned out!

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

I got typhoid typhus and cholera vaccines by wiredog (4.00 / 1) #8 Fri Apr 19, 2013 at 09:36:38 AM EST
before I went to Korea. Sick as a dog for three days... Africa is one of the few places where polio is still endemic.

Earth First!
(We can strip mine the rest later.)

Cholera? by wumpus (2.00 / 0) #12 Sat Apr 20, 2013 at 01:29:51 PM EST
Bog standard "leave the US", Korean worries or nearby locations frequented by GIs? I can't imagine Korea didn't have a sewer system when you were there.

Wumpus

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During Team Spirit 86 by wiredog (2.00 / 0) #13 Mon Apr 22, 2013 at 10:06:04 AM EST
I started a week by wading through a just thawed rice paddy that was fertilized the old fashioned way (no sewer system in the country), then went the rest of the week without showering, shaving, changing any of my clothes (except socks, or sleeping more than 2 hours a night.

There are quite a few places in the US, even in close in rich suburbs, where they still have septic tanks in the ground.

Earth First!
(We can strip mine the rest later.)

[ Parent ]
I'm pretty sure a septic tank by wumpus (2.00 / 0) #14 Mon Apr 22, 2013 at 11:54:22 AM EST
will stop cholera. I also suspect that you aren't going to get cholera from the odd slip&mouthful of paddywater. You pretty much have to close the loop between latrine and drinking supply and then introduce cholera from outside. I think it still takes a pretty dense population to keep the disease going.

Wumpus

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case point by bobdole (2.00 / 0) #15 Tue Apr 23, 2013 at 04:39:56 AM EST
I've actually taken the "traditional traveller" cholera vaccine ('Ducoral'). There are several aspects of it that is interesting to the anti-vaccine movement.
  1. it's administered orally, so that throws of the whole "injecting babies with poison" angle.
  2. it's commonly accepted to be rather inefficient (~50%) and short lasting 2-3 years at the max. So a round of Ducoral won't prevent you from getting sick if you take no precautions. If I remember correctly CDC and most similar national bodies doesn't recommend Ducoral (because of it's inefficiency and cost) - but list it as an option to consider.

-- The revolution will not be televised.
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When conspiracy theory collides with reality. | 15 comments (15 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback