Print Story From 6th grade on, my son didn't give a fuck about
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By ObviousTroll (Mon Aug 15, 2011 at 10:22:48 AM EST) (all tags)
his grades, his school work, or where he was going to end up.

Now he's 19, studying "video game design" at community college and working in a bike shop.




My 14 year old daughter starts 9th grade this fall, and is already nagging me about whether or not she can start applying for college.

I'm not sure which scares me more....
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From 6th grade on, my son didn't give a fuck about | 25 comments (25 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
Your son by yankeehack (2.00 / 0) #1 Mon Aug 15, 2011 at 10:28:57 AM EST
reminds me of my brother, who didn't get his act together until after he was in college and was getting his first non parenal filtered does of the real world.

My brother is doing just fine right now.

We all know that your son won't be working in game design unless he is mega talented and moves to SoCal. There are a few nascent game studios in the area and there is a chapter of the IGDA - at best he might see work for Facebook games, or such.

However, in my former life, I did hire some game designers who were Web designers to pay the bills. 
"...she dares to indulge in the secret sport. You can't be a MILF with the F, at least in part because the M is predicated upon it."-CBB

Right. by ObviousTroll (2.00 / 0) #2 Mon Aug 15, 2011 at 10:39:15 AM EST
and I had a baby brother who didn't get organized till he was in his 30s, and is currently studying for his masters.

Mike's a good human being, I've watched how he treats people and I have no complaints. (He even offered to move out so I could "save money" to pay for Mary's schooling. I turned him down because I know full well you can't live on the money you make working part time in a bike shop....)

And I don't hold his choices against him, except to be frustrated and to worry, it just boggles me how different my two children are.

I was sort of worried/afraid/hopeful he'd follow his GF and enlist; it would help him grow up, but no one wants to see their kid deploy overseas.



An Angry and Flatulent Pig, Trying to Tie Balloon Animals
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That's one of the bits I like most about parenting by lm (4.00 / 1) #6 Mon Aug 15, 2011 at 01:43:10 PM EST
Watching my girls develop into who they are is a wonderful and terrifying thing. And one of the most interesting bits about that is just how different that they are.

There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
agreed by yankeehack (2.00 / 0) #19 Tue Aug 16, 2011 at 12:46:21 PM EST
Watching my girl develop into who she is a wonderful and terrifying thing. And one of the most interesting bits about that is just how different she is from me.
"...she dares to indulge in the secret sport. You can't be a MILF with the F, at least in part because the M is predicated upon it."-CBB
[ Parent ]
Being completely different is one thing... by ObviousTroll (4.00 / 1) #24 Thu Aug 18, 2011 at 09:41:45 AM EST
But they're often like fun-house mirrors of ourselves, and in unexpected ways.

I'm just glad they socialize better than I did - I didn't learn how to cope with other members of genus homo till my 2nd year of college. Lacking those skills made middle and high school a more painful experience than it needed to be.


An Angry and Flatulent Pig, Trying to Tie Balloon Animals
[ Parent ]
I went to college at 18 by wiredog (2.00 / 0) #3 Mon Aug 15, 2011 at 12:31:01 PM EST
Academically I was prepared, but I flunked out. I was 25 and a veteran before I was ready.

A friend in Ocean City has an 18 year old son who is a slacker pothead. Sleeps to Noon, hardly works, watches lots of TV. Says he has "no problem" and besides, weed is natural, man.

Friend and her husband moved to a one bedroom apartment in Arlington this weekend, and sonny boy is being forced, for the first time in his life, to try and make it on his own. We're watching with some amusement.

Earth First!
(We can strip mine the rest later.)

Looking forward to updates on this one by BadDoggie (2.00 / 0) #13 Tue Aug 16, 2011 at 05:38:24 AM EST
Ain't no cheap housing, ain't no way around without a car, and both PG and Southeast are really rotten.

I miss City Paper.

woof.

Jesus Christ you're a tool -- Dr Thrustgood

[ Parent ]
I guess he didn't watch Zoey 101 by georgeha (4.00 / 1) #4 Mon Aug 15, 2011 at 12:44:34 PM EST
Fifteen year old wants to go to a college like that, I tell her to study hard, or she'll end up at SUNY Buffalo.

Theoretically, the U of R offers free tuition to public city school graduates. I assume they have to meet the regular admissions guidelines, and I hope it isn't income based.


My 14 year old has already made up her mind by lm (4.00 / 1) #5 Mon Aug 15, 2011 at 01:41:36 PM EST
She's going to Johns Hopkins.

I keep telling her to slow down.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
Ouch by georgeha (4.00 / 2) #7 Mon Aug 15, 2011 at 01:46:32 PM EST
Do you have any good organs you can sell?


[ Parent ]
And if not by kwsNI (4.00 / 2) #8 Mon Aug 15, 2011 at 02:24:56 PM EST
Any bad organs you can sneak past a life insurance exam?

[ Parent ]
Seven ! by Phage (4.00 / 1) #10 Mon Aug 15, 2011 at 03:11:55 PM EST
I can see you're feeling better. :)

[ Parent ]
Kind of a sad discussion. by the mariner (2.00 / 0) #25 Sun Sep 25, 2011 at 12:10:37 PM EST
This is how one generation of the American middle class defeats the next. Yes, going to an elite university costs real money, but it is well worth the price and, unlike state and small private colleges, elite universities have a real commitment to making school affordable for non-Aristocrats.

Exaggerating the cost of going to a good school just convinces talented students there's no reason to go the extra mile. The result is a new crop of beer pong majors and Southeastern Missouri State Bible College engineering school graduates getting jobs whose title would've been something like "technician" or "electrician" twenty years ago. These degrees also cost real money, but they aren't worth a hell of a lot. That's the bill people should really be afraid of.


[ Parent ]
If her grades and SATs are good enough by wiredog (4.00 / 1) #9 Mon Aug 15, 2011 at 03:11:53 PM EST
She should be able to get a full ride. Most of the good private schools do that.

IIRC, Harvard basically guarantees that if you get in, you'll be able to afford it.

Earth First!
(We can strip mine the rest later.)

[ Parent ]
I'm not worried about paying by lm (4.00 / 3) #11 Mon Aug 15, 2011 at 03:27:16 PM EST
My evil plan to quit my IT job and get by as a poor grad student seems to have worked out well for both of my daughters vis a vis scholarships and grants. (Although the present US Congress is making me a bit nervous about depending on federal dollars.)

I'm more concerned that she look around and figure out what she wants out of life first. JHU is a great school for some things, but not so much for others.

That, and not putting all of her eggs in one basket. JHU is pretty competitive and the odds are stacked against her. But if she applies to 10 or 20 schools, odds are good she'll get into somewhere with a decent package.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
The future by ucblockhead (2.00 / 0) #12 Mon Aug 15, 2011 at 06:18:29 PM EST
When I was a Sophomore or Junior in college, a friend and I used to hang out with this high school kid.  My friend was a hacker, and this kid was also into that.  He was a bit of a partier.  Not so great grades.  In a band.  He always talked about how he was going to "get rich with computers", but didn't want to go to college, a decision I tried to argue him out of, seemingly unsuccessfully.  He didn't finish high school but rather got a GED.  I lost track of him when I graduated college.

Later, I found out he evidently did end up going to community college, then a real college, and then had some minor success.  You can read about it here.

Yeah, it's better to get good grades, and go to college.  But not doing so doesn't guarantee failure.

The other side of the coin is that there are many very happy people, very happily doing low-to-moderate pay blue collar jobs.  Nothing wrong with that.

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[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman

Nothing wrong with that. by wiredog (2.00 / 0) #14 Tue Aug 16, 2011 at 09:03:38 AM EST
Other than the moderate pay blue collar jobs disappearing. No retirement if you're blue collar. No health insurance if you're blue collar.

Earth First!
(We can strip mine the rest later.)

[ Parent ]
Some jobs can't be outsourced... by yankeehack (2.00 / 0) #18 Tue Aug 16, 2011 at 12:44:38 PM EST
what about auto mechanics and plumbers and construction workers?
"...she dares to indulge in the secret sport. You can't be a MILF with the F, at least in part because the M is predicated upon it."-CBB
[ Parent ]
One of those is not like the others. by wiredog (4.00 / 2) #21 Tue Aug 16, 2011 at 01:34:06 PM EST
Construction workers.

Auto mechanics (outside of Jiffy Lube, etc.) and plumbers have extensive educations equivalent to a 4 year degree. Most, but not all, OJT. More of an apprenticeship system.

Earth First!
(We can strip mine the rest later.)

[ Parent ]
Also... by wiredog (2.00 / 0) #15 Tue Aug 16, 2011 at 10:23:28 AM EST
In the US, with just a high school diploma, you're screwed.

Earth First!
(We can strip mine the rest later.)

[ Parent ]
Bingo. by ObviousTroll (4.00 / 1) #16 Tue Aug 16, 2011 at 12:37:51 PM EST
Referring back to that planet money podcast from a few weeks ago - for centuries you could build your wealth by using your brains, or by using your muscles. Unfortunately the second method is no longer possible for most people.

Hell, even China is finding it cheaper to use robots instead of people in factories.


An Angry and Flatulent Pig, Trying to Tie Balloon Animals
[ Parent ]
I used to work in industrial automation. by wiredog (2.00 / 0) #22 Tue Aug 16, 2011 at 01:37:35 PM EST
I've seen this coming for years.

And with Roomba making household cleaning robots and lawn mowing robots...

And military systems getting more autonomous...

Half the population is below average in intelligence (or motivation to use it), and the New New Economy is geared towards the other half...

Earth First!
(We can strip mine the rest later.)

[ Parent ]
The problem with blue collar jobs by ObviousTroll (2.00 / 0) #17 Tue Aug 16, 2011 at 12:39:46 PM EST
is that (a) they've become a shrinking part of the economy and (b) American children generally aren't willing to work that hard, which is why the remaining labor-intensive jobs in the US are now the province of immigrants (legal or illegal).

An Angry and Flatulent Pig, Trying to Tie Balloon Animals
[ Parent ]
speaking of which by yankeehack (2.00 / 0) #20 Tue Aug 16, 2011 at 12:48:03 PM EST
Mike Rowe of Dirty Jobs fame had something to say about this to Congress a few months ago.
"...she dares to indulge in the secret sport. You can't be a MILF with the F, at least in part because the M is predicated upon it."-CBB
[ Parent ]
TED talk by ucblockhead (4.00 / 1) #23 Tue Aug 16, 2011 at 04:12:55 PM EST
His TED talk on the subject is worth viewing.
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[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
[ Parent ]
From 6th grade on, my son didn't give a fuck about | 25 comments (25 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback