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By Gedvondur (Tue Oct 11, 2011 at 05:24:14 PM EST) FUCK YOU (all tags)
And the stagnant growth of wages.


A poorly thought out and spur-of-the-moment rant.


The Occupy * 99%ers are under assault from Randian assmonkies and conservatives.

Randian assholes

The Randian assholes who look at the 99% demonstrations and then wax eloquent about how they were so careful to plan their lives for maximum monetary success are missing the goddamn point.  Just like they always do.  To busy being all bootstrappy to have any sympathy for anyone.  As far as this crowd is concerned, if you have money trouble it's YOUR fault.  You are either lazy, stupid, or both.  They view the 99% crowd as lazy want-something-for-nothing pot-smoking college drop outs who should be spending their time getting a GOD DAMN JOB instead of bothering the successful in financial centers.  After all, if the successful financiers get distracted, it will mean DOOM FOR US ALL!!!

Well, you soul-less Randian asshats, you can fuck right off.  Jobs are HELL to come by and the destruction of the unions has ensured continual downward pressure on wages. Wage growth as been stagnant for over twenty years. The corporate monied elite are achieving their dream:  You are GOING to be a mouse-quiet and meek little cog in their machine or they will get rid of your ass.  Personal time, benefits, retirement?  Basic fairness?  NONE of that is profitable. What IS profitable is keeping you so scared that you do not DARE make a noise to better things.  It will be your job if you do.

They've got us by the proverbial balls. The Occupy movement is a reflection that some folks are beginning to realize it.  Folks that got nothing to lose, like college students with huge debt and no hope of a job outside of food service.


Conservatives and their Republican Corporate Masters

These fuckers are scared shitless of this movement too.  Why?  Because in a lot of ways, it looks a LOT like the early Tea Party.  Hell, it even shares some of the same goals, albeit for different reasons.  That's why they are trying so desperately to discredit the Occupy movement.  It's too much like the Tea Party and if it electrifies the Democrats, the Republicans are going to have an even worse election season than they are looking forward to. 


Why none of it matters anyway.

Street movements like this rarely last more than a month.  The political fallout from them usually not much than three in practical terms.  The Tea Party has been effective not because of their gatherings, but because big business put their money into the brand and marketed the SHIT out of it.  That isn't going to happen to the Occupy movement.

What I see happening is that this fades out in November.  The Republicans nominate Romney, not because they like him, but because the rest of the candidates either have NO chance or are lunatics with NO chance.

Then assholes who are "unhappy" with Obama won't vote for him.  They will make half-assed excuses about 3rd party candidates, but the reality is that every vote not for Obama is essentially for a Republican.  Republicans are not so out of touch with practicality to think that a 3rd party candidate does ANYTHING but spoil the election for one side.

Then we will either get Obama by a slim margin or by some miracle, Romney.  Either way, four more years of shit.


Frankly, I'd like to see of Obama would change when he doesn't have to worry about being elected again.  He was green before, now he as experience and may be an at least somewhat more liberal president than the center-right moderate he's been so far.  God knows it's not like things would be good under a Republican.


Fuck Wall street.  Fuck corporations.  And if you vote Republican, Fuck YOU.
< All's Well That Ends | Money problems >
It is about class inequality | 19 comments (19 topical, 1 hidden) | Trackback
uh. by the mariner (4.00 / 1) #2 Tue Oct 11, 2011 at 06:00:31 PM EST
 I'd hesitate to call the "Tea Party" effective. They have a strong record of running lunatic primary challenges against viable incumbents in tough-for-Republican districts, winning the primary, then losing the general election. They only get media coverage because media outlets are afraid of ignoring marginal conservative movements for fear of being called liberal. 

To be honest, I'm getting to a stage where a Romney administration doesn't sound so bad. I would prefer to see Obama reelected, but as long as the alternative is not a goofball like Perry, that's not a point I'm too exercised about. Maybe Obama is ready to deal some kind of political death blow to the national Republican party, in which case I'll be glad to see it, but if not, Romney at least has the advantage of having once been a sensible person with a career riddled by signs of competence. 

It doesn't matter, though. Corporations aren't the problem in America -- they make and do things that the much lionized "small businesses" can't, as much as I like strip mall Asian cuisine. It's one thing to talk about the financial sector and I agree about that, but "corporate overlords" are just something college town hippies who want to start an agrarian society talk about. 

I suspect the real truth of the matter is that American education is just not producing the big ideas needed to maintain a trajectory of technology fueled economic growth. Shit like a new type of website just doesn't compare to the steam engine, the automobile, the transistor, the television, the personal computer, etc. "Look guys, I just made a new type of MP3 player. Its main features are that it's white, it has a little dialy thing instead of confusing buttons, and its cords are white too!" If this kind of shit leads to shifts in who leads in your technology market, I think you have to wonder if an innovation driven economy like that can last.

Depends on how you define "effective" by lm (4.00 / 4) #4 Tue Oct 11, 2011 at 06:38:52 PM EST
The Tea Party was a tremendous help to the conservative cause to effectively shift the entire political discourse to the right on certain issues.

I also suspect that it contributed in no small part to conservative turnout in the 2010 election cycle. Even if "Tea Party" candidates weren't winning general elections, there were quite a few mainstream GOP candidates riding the coattails of the Tea Party all the way to Washington.

And, the place where they really showed their strength as at the local and state level. Ohio, as one example, is being redistricted by  a republican controlled statehouse thanks in large part to the excitement generated by the Tea Party.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
I don't think that shift has been helpful by the mariner (4.00 / 1) #5 Tue Oct 11, 2011 at 09:51:53 PM EST
To conservative causes. Rather, it seems like Republicans look increasingly nuts. Maybe the Tea Party drove the midterm elections or maybe it's just the raw demographics of midterms and how those demographics compare with the demographics that elected Obama in the general. The only thing I see in the Tea Party and the almost comical degree to which it was promoted in the media is that it told people with crazy/racist/antiquated political notions that it's okay and normal to think crazy/racist/antiquated things. But this is just what conservative media outlets have been doing since the nineties at least. 

Things like "no increases in revenue ever" and "let's default on treasury bonds" while the economy continues to suffer does not seem like a viable strategy. There is literally no credible strategy for improving the economy that the Republicans could put forth right now given the rhetorical position they are in and the basic realities of current policy. This isn't because good ideas aren't out there. It's just that they can't propose any of them because they're so far out there and they're afraid of their base, which now appears to be the Tea Party.


[ Parent ]
It's been exceedingly helpful by lm (4.00 / 3) #8 Wed Oct 12, 2011 at 06:26:42 AM EST
Democrats are now enacting the Republican policies of the eighties and nineties as the "liberal" alternative.

There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
They've been doing that a long time. by the mariner (2.00 / 0) #16 Wed Oct 12, 2011 at 01:32:32 PM EST
 

[ Parent ]
If I had to choose... by ucblockhead (4.00 / 2) #6 Tue Oct 11, 2011 at 10:38:40 PM EST
I'd prefer Romney and a Democratic congress to Obama and a Republican one.
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[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
[ Parent ]
That's why I have to laugh at Herman Cain by lm (2.00 / 0) #10 Wed Oct 12, 2011 at 09:51:28 AM EST
It's hard to imagine a Congress that will pass his 9-9-9 plan.

I think that in general, most voters think that the office of the president has more power with regards to policy than it actually does.

OTOH, I can see why people might think that after the general Democratic uselessness as the majority party in Congress during the last years of the Bush '43 administration.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
Please by jayhawk88 (2.00 / 0) #11 Wed Oct 12, 2011 at 10:33:13 AM EST
Congress couldn't even pass a routine raising of the debt limit for months, they're so full of themselves. Massive, fundamental changes to tax codes/laws have about as much chance of passing as an "Osama Bin Laden Was Right" resolution.

[ Parent ]
"Preferable" by ucblockhead (2.00 / 0) #12 Wed Oct 12, 2011 at 10:44:47 AM EST
Unfortunately, preferable doesn't mean I think much of them.  If the Democrats had a solid 2/3rds majority in both houses, they'd waffle about and get little done for fear of losing it.
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[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
[ Parent ]
the odds of that happening are exceedingly low. by aphrael (2.00 / 0) #14 Wed Oct 12, 2011 at 11:46:30 AM EST
far more likely to get romney with a republican majority in both houses and the abolition of the filibuster.
If television is a babysitter, the internet is a drunk librarian who won't shut up.
[ Parent ]
I think that too is unlikely by ucblockhead (2.00 / 0) #15 Wed Oct 12, 2011 at 12:22:50 PM EST
The current divisive atmosphere makes for close elections, not real majorities.   If I had to lay odds, I'd put Obama at 5:4 and I'd predict small Democratic gains in congress.
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[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
[ Parent ]
the GOP could have pulled it off by lm (2.00 / 0) #17 Wed Oct 12, 2011 at 03:37:39 PM EST
But they overreached. Quite a few middle class, mostly conservative working stiffs are highly motivated to vote blue in states like OH and WI thanks to Republican governors that went too far, too fast.

In a way it's pretty awesome how thoroughly pissed off firefighters are over 'the only good union is a dead union' approach Walker and Rausch have taken.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
I have to say, by ambrosen (4.00 / 1) #18 Wed Oct 12, 2011 at 05:34:36 PM EST
as a union member who's going to vote yes to a strike the minute I get my ballot papers (over an increase in contributions to my final salary pension), that unions in the USA absolutely horrify me.

[ Parent ]
Unions by Herring (2.00 / 0) #19 Wed Oct 12, 2011 at 06:32:27 PM EST
There are a lot of good ideas - unions, democracy, freedom of speech that ought to be good but don't always work out in practise.

Mrs. H. being a teacher - well you'd have to be insane to teach without being a union member. She might be going on strike too. For is actually a pay cut.

christ, we're all old now - StackyMcRacky

[ Parent ]
OWS might burn out by MillMan (4.00 / 5) #3 Tue Oct 11, 2011 at 06:31:07 PM EST
but this bubbling unrest is here to stay. There are too many well educated people with no prospects for everyone to just go back home.

"Just as there are no atheists in foxholes, there are no libertarians in financial crises." -Krugman

Indeed by Oberon (4.00 / 1) #7 Tue Oct 11, 2011 at 11:53:54 PM EST
Tom Tomorrow nails the fake "confusion" of the media on this point:

http://www.credoaction.com/comics/2011/10/what-do-they-want/


How now, mad spirit?
Indeed n/t by Gedvondur (2.00 / 0) #13 Wed Oct 12, 2011 at 11:39:32 AM EST


"So I will be hitting the snatch hard, I think, tonight." - gzt
[ Parent ]
In a nutshell by Herring (4.00 / 1) #9 Wed Oct 12, 2011 at 07:19:46 AM EST
  1. Create loads of pretend money and lend it to people
  2. Profit
  3. ?????


christ, we're all old now - StackyMcRacky
It is about class inequality | 19 comments (19 topical, 1 hidden) | Trackback