Print Story I wonder why.
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By ReboundRabbit (Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 10:26:03 AM EST) (all tags)
Is there a reason...


... that almost every shop, bank branch, etc. is closing between 4.30PM and 5.30PM on this island?!?! 

How do you manage to get things sorted when you

1) have to work till 5.30PM?
2) or don't get your day started before 2.00 PM?
3) live outside of all human settlement area, and it takes ages to get from A to B (with public transportation of course)?
4) you don't know about these habits on this island?

Not that it is frustrating or anything... no...pffff.

< Running an energy deficit | Things happen. >
I wonder why. | 87 comments (87 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
Aren't you German? by jump the ladder (4.00 / 4) #1 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 10:43:59 AM EST
And you're complaining about UK shop opening hours!

Yes, and Yes. by ReboundRabbit (2.00 / 0) #6 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 12:12:08 PM EST
So? :)
Lived in Berlin for years... 3.5 million people can go shopping either until 8PM or 10PM. Groceries stores are sometimes open till midnight.
Shops in major stations are usually open 24/7.
Oh, and at home there ARE actually buses running on holidays. And trains.
Nah, I am not complaining... I am just getting used to all this... I love your island! Serious! 

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
You can go shopping till late by anonimouse (2.00 / 0) #9 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 12:18:03 PM EST
You just can't walk into a bank.
Larger supermarkets don't close between 6am Monday morning and 10pm Saturday.


You have us on station shops, buses and trains though


Girls come and go but a mortgage is for 25 years -- JtL
[ Parent ]
Rusty? -nt by chuckles (4.00 / 1) #2 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 10:48:44 AM EST


"The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin [...] would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities"
It's all part of making... by Metatone (4.00 / 3) #3 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 11:17:53 AM EST
outsiders feel welcome. After all, if other places were open, you might not end up at the pub... 

Which pub? by ReboundRabbit (2.00 / 0) #7 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 12:13:47 PM EST
Oh, you mean that one with 11 people in it on a Friday night? (Including me) ;)

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
This is why by Phage (2.00 / 0) #4 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 11:19:58 AM EST
God gave us internet banking.
Also - You have public transport ? How lucky are you ! In my town there is a bus. Twice a day. 10am and 3pm.

If it just would... by ReboundRabbit (4.00 / 1) #8 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 12:17:20 PM EST
working (for free) if you handle two international accounts at the same time while there's only money in one of them.

Buses! Yes, and I am admiring them. They do have their own will and no one can tell them to come if they don't want to. Neither do they tell you that they won't come. It's a surprise.

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
Buses by Phage (2.00 / 0) #16 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 03:51:17 PM EST
The new Schroedinger's Cat. If you look at them you collapse the probability field. Then.....there is no bus.

International banking is a royal pain. I have the same issues with Australia.

[ Parent ]
I miss smoking. by Breaker (4.00 / 1) #48 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 04:59:22 PM EST
You could always summon a bus by lighting up a tab.


[ Parent ]
Better that by sugar spun (4.00 / 2) #5 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 11:27:02 AM EST
than all day Sunday and right through everyone's lunch break.

Yes, Bavaria, I'm talking to you.

Oh mei, Bavaria! by ReboundRabbit (2.00 / 0) #10 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 12:18:55 PM EST


Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
Indeed. by sugar spun (2.00 / 0) #11 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 02:32:40 PM EST
We do have proper public transport and even on public holidays, but I will never get used to the idea that people who work in customer service jobs where their target market is people who work have exactly the same hours as the people who work, so when the customer is available the shop/office/helpline is closed. Not to mention the supermarket frenzy on a Saturday at 6pm.

[ Parent ]
That is what we call by ReboundRabbit (2.00 / 0) #13 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 02:39:33 PM EST
die Servicewüste Deutschland. If there is a good English translation I'll let you know.
You don't happen to live down there, do you?

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
We do. by sugar spun (2.00 / 0) #19 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 04:25:47 PM EST
All three of us, the rebounding pair and the product of our, um, rebounding off each other.

[ Parent ]
Gr├╝tzi! by ReboundRabbit (2.00 / 0) #22 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 04:38:16 PM EST

Jo mei!
How come? Is one of you German? Job-wise? Like the mountains so much?
Being from Berlin, I have to say, there are quite a lot of stereotypes we "nordish" people foster and maintain... (reciprocal).


Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
Not German by sugar spun (2.00 / 0) #23 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 04:42:35 PM EST
We met here. I came here for work, my husband is a refugee from the US and we met by accident. Things turned out surprisingly well.

[ Parent ]
Bavarian Fate. by ReboundRabbit (2.00 / 0) #25 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 04:44:38 PM EST
Do you speak a little German (better to say Bavarian then) at all?

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
I get by. by sugar spun (2.00 / 0) #26 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 04:46:51 PM EST

My husband is fluent and takes care of the bureaucracy stuff and the phone.



[ Parent ]
Fluent by ReboundRabbit (2.00 / 0) #29 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 05:05:36 PM EST
is always good. :) Grüße nach Deutschland!

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
And from us! by sugar spun (2.00 / 0) #30 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 02:47:43 AM EST
What brought you to the UK?

[ Parent ]
A ship. by ReboundRabbit (2.00 / 0) #31 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 03:56:08 AM EST
I wanted to do another degree, didn't work out financially. But I came over anyway, I needed a change - so here I am.
Now I am finishing the degree I studied in Berlin, and then will look where I'll end up!

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
Which reminds me by Merekat (2.00 / 0) #32 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 04:24:38 AM EST
You might enjoy these as the account of someone who has gone the other direction.

[ Parent ]
blimey by Merekat (2.00 / 0) #15 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 02:47:40 PM EST
At least the Swiss only limit it to Sunday. And put shopping centres in the train stations to cope with that.

[ Parent ]
Station shopping by sugar spun (2.00 / 0) #20 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 04:27:10 PM EST
Available, but generally expensive at half the price.

[ Parent ]
Here in USia by Phil the Canuck (2.00 / 0) #12 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 02:36:39 PM EST
Everything is open almost all the time. Except my bank which, for my convenience, is open until 4:30PM.  On the plus side, I have had to visit my bank exactly four times ever.

Good Ol' Times by ReboundRabbit (2.00 / 0) #14 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 02:42:16 PM EST
I remember going (well, driving) shopping when I lived in TN... At 3 in the morning it's incredible fascinating for me as a sociologist to see what kind of people go shopping at that time... (I don't count - participating observation!).

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
Heh. by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #17 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 04:01:56 PM EST
Wal*Mart in TN at 3 a.m.
I resemble that comment.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
You do what? by ReboundRabbit (2.00 / 0) #18 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 04:13:56 PM EST


Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
Heh by hulver (4.00 / 1) #21 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 04:33:20 PM EST
He's the sort of guy you would see at 3am at a Walmart in TN.
--
Cheese is not a hat. - clock
[ Parent ]
Hulver ist diesmal richtig. by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #24 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 04:43:09 PM EST
Ich komme dabei mit hosen im haend.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
Mit Hosen im Hemd? by ReboundRabbit (4.00 / 1) #27 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 04:47:10 PM EST
Or Hemd in der Hose? There's a slight difference...

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
LOL by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #28 Mon Jan 10, 2011 at 04:52:25 PM EST
Yes, yes there is. :D

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
Dammit by Phage (2.00 / 0) #33 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 05:18:19 AM EST
Now I need to learn a language. Life's too short for German though.

[ Parent ]
Try English by Herring (2.00 / 0) #34 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 07:03:33 AM EST
What you colonials speak isn't that far away.

Herring - Official HuSi diarist of the 2016 European Korfball Championship (October 22nd, Dordrecht, Netherlands)
[ Parent ]
Heh by Phage (2.00 / 0) #36 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 08:37:36 AM EST
Boom-tish !

[ Parent ]
If you're gonna learn another tongue by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #40 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 02:26:18 PM EST
as a native speaker of English, then German will be the easiest choice.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
You lie! by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #47 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 04:58:59 PM EST
Having 2 furn languages (at vastly differing capabilities), German was definitely not the easier to learn in my experience.


[ Parent ]
The other one? by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #50 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 06:38:48 PM EST
Don't say Icelandic either.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
French. by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #51 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 06:47:14 PM EST
Far less regulation on capitalisation, ordering of verbs and so on.


[ Parent ]
Capitalisation by ReboundRabbit (2.00 / 0) #52 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 06:50:11 PM EST
What a true blessing English is regarding that. And only think about the articles in German. Der, die, das - English: the.

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
Yep by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #55 Wed Jan 12, 2011 at 08:11:11 AM EST
And Du / Sie...


[ Parent ]
Don't forget by ReboundRabbit (2.00 / 0) #59 Wed Jan 12, 2011 at 08:53:54 AM EST
Du or du, Sie or sie. Still slightly a difference (at least when used in the written way).

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
Aaaaah! by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #62 Wed Jan 12, 2011 at 05:59:24 PM EST
Your gentle suggestions there remind me of my Cherman[1] teacher!

The point still stands though, Der, Die, Das - the and then Du, Sie - you.

The problem then comes in English, we have circumlocutions instead of formal / informal, which are probably even harder to get your head around.

[1] Term of affection for Der Deutschelanders, in case anyone wants to get aggro about it.  Again.


[ Parent ]
Don't forget "Ihr". by Captain Tenille (4.00 / 1) #66 Thu Jan 13, 2011 at 12:42:01 PM EST
Or the subtly different "ihr". 

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[ Parent ]
Don't by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #73 Thu Jan 13, 2011 at 05:02:50 PM EST
You start, Mr!

Or should I say, Sie?


[ Parent ]
Eh? by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #54 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 07:22:35 PM EST
The French have an organization wholly dedicated to the purity of the tongue! That seems to be not very n00b-friendly to me.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
That's only vocabulary by Breaker (4.00 / 1) #56 Wed Jan 12, 2011 at 08:12:02 AM EST
Everyone across Europe I know calls email "email".

Apart from in France, where it is the cumbersome courant electronique.  No abbreviation.


[ Parent ]
Proper German by ReboundRabbit (4.00 / 2) #58 Wed Jan 12, 2011 at 08:52:50 AM EST
would be E-Mail. :)

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
Indeed! by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #63 Wed Jan 12, 2011 at 06:04:07 PM EST
But still, a nation comfortable enough with the national language to be able to assimilate a new word - albeit with a localised capitalisation!

How goes the campaign to replace the B with the dropped tail with a ss spelling instead?

Last time I was in Stuttgart, there was a lot of support for it; I blame cheap keyboards forcing Chermans[1] to remember arcane alt-gr key combos to get the dropped tail B and other characters not normally found on a mass market UK/US keyboard layout.

[1] See previous comment


[ Parent ]
Not comfortable enough. by ReboundRabbit (4.00 / 1) #67 Thu Jan 13, 2011 at 01:16:36 PM EST
As there is a discussion about American English "invading" the British English, there is a discussion of Anglizismus (Anglicism) in Germany. I don't think we are a comfortable nation in that regard. But again I am using this silly "we". There is no "we" as there is no "the/a German". Some are comfortable - probably all these people using English terms in their daily life. Some aren't comfortable with English or any other language "invading" the German language. The majority of this kind of people probably are linguists.
We did have the broad discussed "Rechtschreibereform" in 1996 I suppose (what a nice word, no literally translation, but: reform of orthography). BUT, they didn't get (entirely) rid of the B with the tail also call sharp 's' or 'sz' or ß. It still does exist, and is properly used. Now, don't ask me when, and when not. Even after years I am still getting confused. I am glad I am writing my papers in English now... :)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_orthography_reform_of_1996 for everyone who wants to learn more.


Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
"schreiber" by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #72 Thu Jan 13, 2011 at 04:50:39 PM EST
You had me there, though.

Bit of a Germanophile, me.  Can you bring more of that delicious meatloaf mit senf while you're at it, please?


[ Parent ]
What exactly do you mean... by ReboundRabbit (2.00 / 0) #78 Thu Jan 13, 2011 at 05:56:17 PM EST
Are a) really talking about meatloaf, and if yes, what kind of please? Buletten (as the Berliner would say), Fleischbällchen as they might be called somewhere else. Which mustard?!
Or a you b) talking about "Senf dazu geben" which would be ... please shut up, Cherman? ;)

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
Uhm, fleischkase I believe it is by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #81 Fri Jan 14, 2011 at 06:15:25 AM EST
Down in sunny Stuttgart and also Straubing.

I hadn't realised there was more than one senf, though; I've only been offered one sort.  Even at the Straubing beerfest, can you believe.

It was still one of the the best weekends I've ever had though, Straubing.  15 thousand+ drunken Chermans and no grief between them.  I was shocked at how few police were there, and even then they were mostly ornamental - nothing for them to do.


[ Parent ]
Lots and lots and lots. by ReboundRabbit (2.00 / 0) #82 Fri Jan 14, 2011 at 08:00:33 AM EST
I just checked the dictionary. Even 'meat loaf' has got numerous translations. Fleischkäse, as the people in the South say and eat, is only one of its many manifestations.  I prefer Hackbraten, but I love Buletten (meat balls I assume).
However, Senf does exist (and not only in Germany - even here in the UK) in all different kinds! You didn't know that? Serious? There might be only one Senf the Southern Chermans prefer with Fleischkäse. Which could be, similar to the Bavarians and their Weißwurscht, a sweet version of mustard. But you're talking to a Northern Cherman here (well, more Eastern, really). I am not at all familiar with the Southern cuisine of Chermanland. :)

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
In England, yes by Breaker (4.00 / 1) #83 Fri Jan 14, 2011 at 09:13:40 AM EST
In Chermany[1], I was only ever offered but one sort though; never wholegrain, just a kind of yellow thick paste which wasn't as biting as English mustard.  Still delightfully tasty in a nice bread roll, a slab of fleischkase and a touch of ketchup.

Ach, I miss Cherman bread.  I've been around almost all of European countries, a fair portion of North America and Asia to boot.

No one does bread like the Chermans.  No one comes even close.  In fact, I'm almost dribbling, just talking about it!

[1] Term of endearment, for language misanthropes.


[ Parent ]
Bautzener Senf is the best. Ever. by ReboundRabbit (2.00 / 0) #84 Fri Jan 14, 2011 at 10:10:51 AM EST
I can get you one next time I go home.
And German bread... Oooh, I hear you. I so hear you! I miss it, I really miss it.
Though you can get some of this full grain bread at Lidl, there's nothing like a fresh baked Sauerteigbrot/Mischbrot/Graubrot .. Well, you could bake it yourself... That's almost as good.

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
I would like that by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #85 Fri Jan 14, 2011 at 10:47:23 AM EST
And I'll pay you double, including postage for it.

Lidl does get a little bit close, sometimes, and I have tried baking my own bread.

It's OK, tasty rather than just edible, but it's not Cherman[1] bread.

Even in the airport at Stuttgart, they had their own ovens.

No wonder since I stopped going to Stuttgart, I've lost a stone in weight.

But, oh, the bread!

[1] Still a term of endearment.


[ Parent ]
Postage is fine. by ReboundRabbit (4.00 / 1) #86 Fri Jan 14, 2011 at 10:51:17 AM EST
That's a deal. :) If bread would be easy to ship, I'd do that, too. But it won't be as fresh...

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
I know... by Breaker (4.00 / 1) #87 Fri Jan 14, 2011 at 11:03:55 AM EST
MBW has a friend in Straubing, who comes across with bread she aplogises for - "it's been in the airport and cabin all day!"

We embarass ourselves by scrabbling for her bag, instead of greeting our guest.

She's used to it, though! :)


[ Parent ]
I did a year of German in high school by Phage (2.00 / 0) #60 Wed Jan 12, 2011 at 03:57:54 PM EST
Not easy at all.

[ Parent ]
Strangely enough by Captain Tenille (4.00 / 1) #37 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 01:07:16 PM EST
My "accidentally learn German by listening to shitloads of opera" thing has progressed to the point where I was able to pick most of that out. Bizarre. 

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[ Parent ]
So, if... by ReboundRabbit (2.00 / 0) #38 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 01:29:47 PM EST
I start singing to you now in German, you'd understand what I want? ;)

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
well by Merekat (4.00 / 1) #39 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 01:32:10 PM EST
Only if it was about revenge. Opera seems to have a limited vocab.

[ Parent ]
Der Rache Werk... by Captain Tenille (2.00 / 0) #41 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 02:32:38 PM EST
 Kein Text.

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[ Parent ]
Maybe. by Captain Tenille (2.00 / 0) #42 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 03:15:53 PM EST
Along with what Merekat said, though, the vocabulary's a bit unusual. I've been told "herbei" is not a commonly used word anymore and that you shouldn't use "Weib" in polite conversation. "Bist du mir gram darum?" is hopelessly archaic, far as I can tell. I will say, though, that "Schamloser Albensohn" is one of the best insults in any language I've ever come across.

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[ Parent ]
Herbei, herbei! by ReboundRabbit (2.00 / 0) #43 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 03:31:36 PM EST
Yes, oh well that might be true. All quoted words would be rarely found in today's language. Weib, you're right, is - unfortunately - negatively connotated. You would hopefully use it only in a humorous way...
I've never heard of "schamloser Albensohn" before!  But it does sound rather rude to me, too... :) Ein Hoch auf die deutsche Sprachkultur!

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
The context by Captain Tenille (2.00 / 0) #44 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 03:46:11 PM EST
 "Schamloser Albensohn" there is being directed at someone who is actually the son of a gnome (far as I'm aware, everywhere else in The Ring Alberich is described as a dwarf - that line and the line immediately following it ("Des Alben Erbe / fordert so sein Sohn!") are the only places that I can think of that use "Alben" rather than "Zwerg").

On closer examination, though, "Alben" here might refer to "elf". BlueOregon would probably know.


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[ Parent ]
The Ring? by ReboundRabbit (2.00 / 0) #45 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 04:01:18 PM EST
Nibelungen Saga? Wagner?

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
Wagner. by Captain Tenille (2.00 / 0) #46 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 04:01:59 PM EST
 

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[ Parent ]
Weiblich, however, is still 'good to go' by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #65 Thu Jan 13, 2011 at 04:27:29 AM EST

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
Weiblich. by ReboundRabbit (4.00 / 1) #68 Thu Jan 13, 2011 at 01:23:08 PM EST
As opposed to männlich. Yes. Weib is just an archaic expression for wife with a slight undertone of possession.
Nice picture, ammo. ;)

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
Genau! by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #70 Thu Jan 13, 2011 at 04:40:46 PM EST
Doch! Bestimmt!

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
It's because of the nature of Britain by Herring (4.00 / 1) #35 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 07:04:51 AM EST
Psycholocially half-way between the US and Europe we pick up traits from both. So we have French customer service and American quality.

Herring - Official HuSi diarist of the 2016 European Korfball Championship (October 22nd, Dordrecht, Netherlands)
Boring yet factual answer by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #49 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 05:31:25 PM EST
In order for the banks to clear cheques and do a whole load of other manual processing, cross checking, cash counting of teller positions and so on to please the book balancers and regulators, the banks close the doors before the end of the working day to enable the rest of the staff to get on with those tasks before they go home.

Some banks are open on Saturdays, or open early and/or late one day a week.

Sorry about that.


True words. by ReboundRabbit (2.00 / 0) #53 Tue Jan 11, 2011 at 06:54:21 PM EST
I certainly understand the reasons. I just don't understand then again, why in Germany bank branches do are open until 5 or 6 PM. The German bank system shouldn't be that different, is it?

However, other shops (not talking about supermarkets - you got me on that), do close at 4.30PM, too, and that's odd as well.

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
I don't know too much about German by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #57 Wed Jan 12, 2011 at 08:13:59 AM EST
Retail banking, but in UKia it's a cultural hangover from manual processing; the banks probably haven't thought to re-engineer their daily processes.

Which shops are closing at 4:30?  That's pretty unusual in my experience.


[ Parent ]
Ooh, you got me on this. by ReboundRabbit (2.00 / 0) #61 Wed Jan 12, 2011 at 04:05:48 PM EST
I think, if I remember correctly, some shops in down town Sheffield ... like small shops. I remember me running around in the search of a more quality lip balm and shops like Bodyshop etc. were closed. In my frustration I might have "exaggerate the time backwards". Maybe it was 5.30 and not 4.30. But even that would be rather unusual early. It was in the middle of the week. Hm.

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
I've no idea then! by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #64 Wed Jan 12, 2011 at 06:09:15 PM EST
I'm a soft southerner, who's only lived as far as Leicester.

Shops were open then most of the day; but some open at 8am and shut early, some open at 10am and shut later.

Then again, when I was young and stupid[2], I was in several Cherman cities on a Sunday, and nothing was open.

No corner shops, no cafes, pubs or restaurants. 

Which when you're 17 years old and built on constant eating, is something of a problem if you have no car to get to the out of town petrol stations which are permitted to open on Sundays...

[2] I'm no longer young, but the rest still holds.


[ Parent ]
Oh yes. I sometimes forget. by ReboundRabbit (4.00 / 1) #69 Thu Jan 13, 2011 at 01:31:00 PM EST
How things were back in the past.... ;) Meaning when I was younger, too, (NO, hulver, NO COMMENT HERE!). I grew up in a small town at the Polish boarder, and of course the city was dead on Sundays. Die Bürgersteige hochgeklappt, as we'd say. But I think some tea shops and the like where still open.
Moving to Berlin later on might have spoilt me ...
Where have you been to in Germany?

Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
Quite a few places.... by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #71 Thu Jan 13, 2011 at 04:47:38 PM EST
A bit of Berlin, a touch of Munich, and much more Stuttgart.

I liked it, after a while, once I'd got my head around the language.

Language defines you; I don't think you can understand anyone unless you speak that in common.

Or maybe that's just me.

In any case, if MBW was tractable, we'd be living in a nice suburb of Stuttgart by now, that's how much I liked being there.

Sadly, she's not too good on foreign languages.


[ Parent ]
MBW? by ReboundRabbit (2.00 / 0) #74 Thu Jan 13, 2011 at 05:16:36 PM EST


Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
(Comment Deleted) by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #75 Thu Jan 13, 2011 at 05:29:38 PM EST

This comment has been deleted by Breaker



[ Parent ]
Ah, Sorry by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #76 Thu Jan 13, 2011 at 05:30:10 PM EST
My Beautiful Wife.

HTH.


[ Parent ]
HTH? ;) by ReboundRabbit (2.00 / 0) #77 Thu Jan 13, 2011 at 05:51:39 PM EST


Optional activity: Standing around and enjoying life. -- Jan Gehl (Architect)

[ Parent ]
Happy To Help by hulver (2.00 / 0) #79 Fri Jan 14, 2011 at 02:40:50 AM EST

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Cheese is not a hat. - clock
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I thought it was by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #80 Fri Jan 14, 2011 at 06:05:16 AM EST
Hope That Helps.


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I wonder why. | 87 comments (87 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback