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Food
By Breaker (Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 12:49:16 PM EST) (all tags)
Looking for recipe suggestions for a starter and main course.

3 carnivores and a veggie to dinner on Saturday.

Suggestions?



Ideally, some starters that will be easy to move to meaty and still be tasty as vegetarian. 

So a base of something with either meat or quorn on top perhaps?

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Attn: HuSi kitchen geniuses | 48 comments (48 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
why not skip the meat on the starters? by StackyMcRacky (4.00 / 1) #1 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 01:16:58 PM EST
leave it for the main course?

That is a possibility, yes. by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #2 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 01:30:31 PM EST
Grilled mushrooms with cheesy breadcrumb and pesto stuffing is my current choice; can put a curl of parma ham on top if needed.


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i'm just sayin' by StackyMcRacky (4.00 / 1) #3 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 01:46:35 PM EST
the lazy way out is always an option!

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Hehe I like your way of thinking! by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #11 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 04:54:53 PM EST
Do you perchance have a newsletter?


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Vegetarians... by dmg (4.00 / 1) #4 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 04:01:58 PM EST
They should make allowances, the same way us carnivores do. 
--
dmg - HuSi's most dimwitted overprivileged user.
That was quite good by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #14 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 05:01:53 PM EST
But this particular veggie I have no beef (*) with her; she's a veggie through dietary restriction rather than dogma.  She'll happily cook meat or fish for her family, just struggles to eat it herself.

(*) nor myco protein substitute.


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I went veggie a few months ago by nebbish (4.00 / 1) #41 Thu Sep 02, 2010 at 08:49:13 AM EST
But consider it rude to enforce this when someone's cooking me a meal, so don't bring it to dinner parties. This also ensures that I still have meat every now and again, cos let's face it it tastes great.

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It's political correctness gone mad!

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Any reason for the change? by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #44 Thu Sep 02, 2010 at 09:35:59 AM EST
How are you finding it?


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Animal lover by nebbish (4.00 / 1) #45 Thu Sep 02, 2010 at 10:28:22 AM EST
NO NOT THAT WAY! I felt guilty about killing animals so thought I'd better stop. Been thinking about it for years and was starting to feel like a bit of a hypocrite.

I wasn't expecting health benefits, thinking all that stuff was bollocks hippy propoganda, but in all honesty the weight has fallen off and I feel great.

(I'm not discounting that this is just part of being generally more aware about what I eat, and the fact that most veggie food doesn't go well with mashed potatoes and gravy like meat does)

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It's political correctness gone mad!

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I too am an animal lover by Breaker (4.00 / 1) #46 Thu Sep 02, 2010 at 11:41:01 AM EST
Roasted, with garlic.  Boom-tish.

Fair enough on the hypocrite stance.  I'll happily look the beast in the eye as I kill it humanely though, I don't know of many carnies who would though.


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That's what I mean by nebbish (4.00 / 1) #47 Thu Sep 02, 2010 at 11:53:32 AM EST
I couldn't, so I shouldn't be eating them.

Anyone who can and does is fine with me.

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It's political correctness gone mad!

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You big softie! by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #48 Thu Sep 02, 2010 at 12:08:40 PM EST
A couple of my mates who are veggie for ethical reasons did so for exactly your reason.

How's the farts though?


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say no to quorn by Merekat (4.00 / 1) #5 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 04:02:34 PM EST
Quorn is not vegetarian food - it is for people who can't cope with  veg. I hate most veg but I'd still rather not have quorn.

Starters, just do a nice veg soup if the weather is bad, or fruit salad, melon dominating that you can serve some ham with. Or mixed antipasti -salamis, olives, other tasty stuff from jars.

Mains...if you want a stew or chilli, prep the same veg and seasonings for two and add meat to a different pot. Use marigold veg stock - it is tasty stuff.  Or involtini, half with meat, half with aubergine (meat eaters will probably enjoy them too and you don't need to do the egg-based fillings). Or indian - curry and a daal plus rice. Again, meat eaters will enjoy daal.  Or if you want to just do meat and veg, give the vegetarian a nice juicy, tasty grilled portabello mushroom with garlic where you've given everyone else beef. The prep and cooking process is practically identical. Also, pick your own gourmet topping homemade pizza will scale to 4 if your oven is big enough.

now, now by R343L (4.00 / 1) #7 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 04:11:51 PM EST
Quorn is tasty ... if you treat it as junk food you're eating for convenience (omg fake chicken nuggets). But in general I agree that just substituting quorn is kind of lame.

"There will be time, there will be time / To prepare a face to meet the faces that you meet." -- Eliot
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Some nice ideas in there by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #12 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 04:55:56 PM EST
TYVM.


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lasagne! by aphrael (4.00 / 1) #23 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 05:52:14 PM EST
starters by R343L (4.00 / 1) #6 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 04:09:58 PM EST
I had this really great idea the other night for an appetizer. My darling A makes this really awesome (but incredibly rich) cheddar and red wine risotto. You have to use really good cheddar (sharpish) and lots of it. The red obviously just has to be drinkable. I can hit him up for the order of when things go up if you're interesting. He normally makes it as a main course, but the last time we did there were a few, well, not complaints per se, but rather comments that it was maybe too rich.

So, the thought I had was: make this risotto, then form it into small patties (maybe a bit over an inch diameter and half to three quarters thick). Then fry the patties so the outsides are crispy. Then present on a platter with a dollup of creme fraiche or something else tart or sweet to counter the richness. Appetizers are supposed to be over the top yummy so it's okay if they are super rich -- you only eat a few bites.

I don't have any good suggestions for a main dish (I avoid just substituting quorn for meat), but for a substantial side if you like peasant food, a gratin of mixed root veggies (potatoes, turnips, beets, sunchokes, etc.) sliced thin and layered with strips of kale or collard greens with a bechamel poured on each layer. Finish with more bechamel and cheese on top. Incredibly substantial if you do it right (note: it is hard to add too much greens because they kind of disappear). Note that I put quite a bit of spice into the bechamel (bit of chile and other things) to give it some flavor other than OMG CREAMY GOODNESS.

"There will be time, there will be time / To prepare a face to meet the faces that you meet." -- Eliot

(Comment Deleted) by aggressive cyclist (4.00 / 1) #9 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 04:38:13 PM EST

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yeah by R343L (2.00 / 0) #10 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 04:52:08 PM EST
It's not original I knew, just interesting, and leftovers is better. And when A makes risotto he makes absurdly huge batches. Hence the reason why I thought of it.

"There will be time, there will be time / To prepare a face to meet the faces that you meet." -- Eliot
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(Comment Deleted) by aggressive cyclist (4.00 / 1) #13 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 04:59:59 PM EST

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I have never made them by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #16 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 05:10:02 PM EST
But a friend does them very, very well.  Going to nick her recipe before she goes back to Oz; they are great as a starter and delicious as a main.


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(Comment Deleted) by aggressive cyclist (4.00 / 1) #17 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 05:11:02 PM EST

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Yep. by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #19 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 05:18:11 PM EST
Sadly there is a moratorium on kitchen equipment until I get the second storey of kitchen cupboards built.

That and a non-trivial sized food processor are all I'm lacking that would get used more than 10 times per year - our metric when binning superfluous kitchen gear when we moved.


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MBW informs me by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #20 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 05:40:28 PM EST
Italian immigrants to Oz popularised this, but arancini "sounds a bit like spiders" so "rissoles" sounds sufficiently exotic but not too much so.

I'd call them little balls of deliciousness, myself.


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(Comment Deleted) by aggressive cyclist (2.00 / 0) #22 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 05:51:09 PM EST

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The Maltese by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #26 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 06:10:55 PM EST
Have something similar, can't remember what they call it.


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That sounds a bit like the Aussie rissole by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #15 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 05:06:36 PM EST
See The Castle for details.

And yes, rice plus lots of cheese will sit heavily; best placed in a 5 course meal with very small portions or a small bit as a start. 

We have a fair few root veggies and greens in our farm veggie box today; some sort of sauce based gratin would probably go down nicely, and I'll probably nick Merekat's big mushroom idea as a meat substitute.

And thanks for the recipes!

OT: Down to my last quarter inch of bacon salt.  I just keep finding new uses for it.  Like, awesome on freshly made popcorn.


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i've had that risotto. by aphrael (2.00 / 0) #24 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 05:53:07 PM EST
(Comment Deleted) by aggressive cyclist (4.00 / 1) #8 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 04:34:30 PM EST

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Ah my bad, sorry! by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #18 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 05:14:52 PM EST
Should have also said the veggie isn't into chillies at all.

Borscht would be a good idea; got plenty of beetroots.

Some excellent ideas there, a_c, I would guess you have a lot of experience in minimising effort to deliver tasty carnivore and veggie plates. 

Will probably avoid the Thai curry tomorrow but those recipe suggestions will be experimented with when it's just the family - the beef, chicory and ginger sounds excellent.  For the tea - English tea or Japanese Green tea?  Leaves in or stewed and strained?

Cheers for the ideas.


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(Comment Deleted) by aggressive cyclist (2.00 / 0) #25 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 05:58:01 PM EST

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Cook the vegetarian by marvin (2.00 / 0) #21 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 05:45:59 PM EST
That way, at least the carnivores will be happy, and you won't have to worry about catering to a minority.

Sausage, anyone?

I will not be meta-trolled! by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #27 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 06:13:43 PM EST
This is a serious diary, not looking for some carni / veggie clash.

How about something nice both camps can enjoy, that doesn't put too much overhead on the cooking side?


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Go Ottoman Empire, go by marvin (4.00 / 1) #28 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 06:58:05 PM EST
Others have suggested Indian, but Greek / middle eastern would be the way I'd go there.

Kebabs are nice and easy to cook on the bbq, and can be prepared in advance. You can do meat ones, along with veggie ones using just onions, tomato, bell peppers and mushrooms.

This goes well with greek salad (assuming that feta is okay for your vegetarian), hummous, tabouleh, baba ganoush, pita, tzaziki. Everything is fairly easy, and for stuff that you don't want to make from scratch, Casbah makes some tolerable box mixes (find stuff like that in health food stores, not sure if you can find them in Londinium).

Almost all of it can be made in advance, freeing you from kitchen time when your guests are there. The only meat is in (some of) the kebabs, you have a complete protein with the chick pea and tahini in the hummous, tons of dips / appies, and everything is tasty.

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Can do a pilaf too by marvin (4.00 / 2) #29 Fri Aug 27, 2010 at 07:08:51 PM EST
and roast potatoes drizzled with olive oil, etc. Probably other stuff you could add as well. The important thing is that your guests are all eating the same stuff, saving you time and trouble.

My sister-in-law is celiac, so when there's a family potluck style dinner, my wife usually prepares (gluten free) food that everyone will be able to enjoy. However, my wife picks her dishes carefully so that you don't really notice the absence of wheat - as much as possible, she aims for everyone to be eating the same food, so that nobody is singled out as "different". It's less work as well. Even dessert, where it is hard to avoid gluten, is handled with something like a pavlova.

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Some good suggestions there by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #30 Sat Aug 28, 2010 at 03:59:14 AM EST
TYVM.


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Carni-Veggie Clash by aphrael (4.00 / 1) #32 Sun Aug 29, 2010 at 04:44:57 PM EST
(Comment Deleted) by anonimouse (2.00 / 0) #31 Sat Aug 28, 2010 at 04:32:34 PM EST

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I do not understand by codemonkey uk (4.00 / 1) #33 Wed Sep 01, 2010 at 07:22:12 AM EST
The compulsion for non-vegetarians to have meat in EVERY MEAL.

If there's a vegetarian in the group, why not just serve food that doesn't have meat?

It's not exactly limiting.



--- Thad ---
Almost as Smart As you.

I do not understand by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #34 Wed Sep 01, 2010 at 09:57:34 AM EST
The compulsion to not have meat EVER.

Probably best park it there, eh?


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There is a conceptual difference by codemonkey uk (2.00 / 0) #35 Wed Sep 01, 2010 at 10:40:01 AM EST
And you know it, so don't be a dick about it.

--- Thad ---
Almost as Smart As you.
[ Parent ]
And that is by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #36 Wed Sep 01, 2010 at 10:42:16 AM EST
What, exactly?


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As an analogy by codemonkey uk (2.00 / 0) #37 Wed Sep 01, 2010 at 10:56:39 AM EST
Imagine you like satay chicken.  In fact, you fucking love it.  Mmmm mmmm, delicious.  Most of your friends do too.

But hold on!  One of your friends is allergic to peanuts!  What a jerk.  How inconvenient!

Do you (a) select something else to server for your dinner party, or (b) cook satay chicken anyway, and also something else for the guy who has an allergy, whilst feeling bitter and resentful about the extra effort?

The point is, there is nothing about being an omnivore that dictates that you MUST have meat in EVERY meal.  It is not a dietary or moral imperative, and acting as if it is - acting as if serving food to a vegetarian (or vegan, even) is a gross fucking inconvenience - is just stupid.



--- Thad ---
Almost as Smart As you.

[ Parent ]
Bad analogy. by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #38 Wed Sep 01, 2010 at 11:37:25 AM EST
I don't think you'd go into anaphylactic shock if you ate a pork sausage.  An upset tummy and outraged morals, perhaps.

A better analogy would be someone on the Atkins diet coming to your house for dinner.

In any case, this diary was trying to find a way to put something together that everyone can eat and enjoy, with little extra overhead to accommodate both camps. 

Refer back to my comment #27; you're arguing against no viewpoint espoused by me in this diary.

Much the same as many peoples' vegetarianism, my choice to serve meat for those who eat it is as valid as their choice not to.  Seeking to minimise the overhead for this is surely no crime, even for the most militant of veggies.


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It's a good analogy by codemonkey uk (2.00 / 0) #39 Wed Sep 01, 2010 at 11:57:26 AM EST
Either way you loose a friend.

But anyway, my points wasn't supposed to be "you should not serve meat", more along the lines of "why bother with two dishes, vegi food is just as yummy".

--- Thad ---
Almost as Smart As you.

[ Parent ]
Lose != loose by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #40 Wed Sep 01, 2010 at 12:33:59 PM EST
Man that one really grates my carrot.

You may find this strange, but I do not find veggie food as tasty, on balance.  Mushroom soup tastes much better with chicken stock in it, as do a panopoly of bean casseroles and so forth.


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Prob my fave veggie meal at the moment by nebbish (2.00 / 0) #42 Thu Sep 02, 2010 at 08:54:52 AM EST
Pasta with walnut sauce.

Blend some walnuts, olive oil and parmesan in a blender with one clove of raw garlic and some black pepper. Ratios vary to taste but you need quite a lot of walnuts and parmesan. Look it up on the internet, I tend to be a bit random about it though.

The garlic gives it just the right amount of bite and tastes great, don't be tempted to put another clove in though, it pushes it over the edge.

Mix it with pasta and halved raw cherry tomatoes.

Not sure if this is a dinner party dish really, but it's great comfort food and dead easy to make. No cooking apart from the pasta.

The proper Italian way is to skin the walnuts, but this is such a pain it's untrue (does taste better though).

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It's political correctness gone mad!

Sounds nice by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #43 Thu Sep 02, 2010 at 09:35:07 AM EST
And yes, walnuts are more pain to skin that it's worth.


[ Parent ]
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