Print Story Hey, bike riders - need an opinion.
Cycling
By ObviousTroll (Thu Apr 15, 2010 at 12:41:10 PM EST) (all tags)
I realized the other day that I would actually rather buy a road bike than buy a new Macbook. It was quite a personal revelation.


The problem is - I have to keep the total cost down to around what I would pay for an 13" MBP - $1500, absolute max, after getting road pedals and road shoes and other ancillary crap. Making things more complicated is that my weight and riding has been really hard on my commuter bikes - I replaced both wheels on my old Trek 820 several times, the cranks on the Trek had to be replaced twice and I've replaced the rear wheel on my current Specialized Crosstrail was replaced with a custom-built model.

So, basically I fear buying a light weight road bike because I think I'll destroy it in short order. (I also worry about destroying my butt, but I don't want to overshare.)

On the other hand, on my latest long distance ride I really only averaged 10 miles an hour over 60 miles (factoring in the time spent on rest stops) so while I might be able to ride 100 miles on it, I doubt I would be able to finish the same day I started - so, I need to get a road bike before I try to do the Tour De Cure in June.

To sum up: Because this bike would be strictly for long distance rides I'm looking at maybe the Specialized Sirrus (Comp or Elite) or the Secteur (either the Sport or Elite Triple). Any opinions?


< It's a boy! | I'm going to get some coffee. >
Hey, bike riders - need an opinion. | 25 comments (25 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
Touring bike by marvin (4.00 / 3) #1 Thu Apr 15, 2010 at 12:54:03 PM EST
Built for loads and comfort when riding, can accept water bottles, racks, you name it. I don't even need to look at those bikes to know that something named "Elite" is probably not for you. Too many road bikes are specced for racing, and compromise on everything else.

Components like carbon fibre seatposts on racing bikes have a weight limit, and catastrophic failure means requiring you to have a surgeon pick carbon fibre out of your prostate.

Jamis Aurora. $1k. Drop a Brooks saddle on it, and you're good to go. That or a Surly Long Haul Trucker, or another touring bike that gets good reviews. Try bikeforums.net as well - good community there.

Whoa. by technician (2.00 / 0) #2 Thu Apr 15, 2010 at 12:58:18 PM EST
That's a nice looking bike. Damn.

[ Parent ]
The Sirrus is actually a comfort/touring bike. by ObviousTroll (2.00 / 0) #3 Thu Apr 15, 2010 at 01:01:43 PM EST
The main reason for looking at it is the flat handlebars, I've already got enough shoulder & back problems, I don't think I'm going to like drop downs.

But, you nailed my worries about composite parts to a T. Metal tends to fail a lot more gracefully.  

Thanks for the tip on the Jamis - I'll look into it.


An Angry and Flatulent Pig, Trying to Tie Balloon Animals
[ Parent ]
Not like. You're going to love drops by marvin (4.00 / 1) #5 Thu Apr 15, 2010 at 01:05:33 PM EST
Way more hand positions available, so you can switch it up. Make sure your handlebars are higher than your seat, too. Ask hulver about that.

[ Parent ]
IAWTP by hulver (4.00 / 1) #7 Thu Apr 15, 2010 at 01:27:20 PM EST

--
Cheese is not a hat. - clock
[ Parent ]
Heh. That Aurora looks like by ObviousTroll (2.00 / 0) #4 Thu Apr 15, 2010 at 01:02:33 PM EST
it time warped out of the 1970s. Nice look to it.


An Angry and Flatulent Pig, Trying to Tie Balloon Animals
[ Parent ]
On my list for 2010 expenditures by marvin (2.00 / 0) #6 Thu Apr 15, 2010 at 01:15:00 PM EST
I had a Jamis Satellite, their low end road bike, for a year or so. I liked the value and the build, but I should have gotten a larger frame, and missed having multiple sets of braze-ons (for things like pumps, extra bottles) as well as the ability to drop on fenders, racks, and stuff like that.

The Aurora has always had decent reviews in the past, but I haven't checked any reviews from owners on bikeforums lately.

[ Parent ]
That'll be April's DisturbingThoughtOTM. by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #9 Thu Apr 15, 2010 at 04:14:35 PM EST
Thanks for that.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
Your compliment is greatly appreciated by marvin (4.00 / 1) #12 Thu Apr 15, 2010 at 05:46:23 PM EST
Glad I could be of service, and hope that I can help you again in the future with any similar needs.

[ Parent ]
It takes non-trivial quanta of disturbium by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #14 Thu Apr 15, 2010 at 08:33:49 PM EST
to disturb me, you know.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
Go with a compact crank by miker2 (2.00 / 0) #8 Thu Apr 15, 2010 at 02:25:10 PM EST
instead of a triple.  Roughly the same gearing as the triple without the extra mechanical bits/movement that can cause problems.  

Ah, sociopathy. How warm, how comforting, thy sweet embrace. - MNS
I thought a compact crank by ObviousTroll (2.00 / 0) #17 Fri Apr 16, 2010 at 03:33:56 PM EST
it does by miker2 (2.00 / 0) #22 Fri Apr 16, 2010 at 06:24:57 PM EST
but it makes the other two smaller.

Standard road cranks have 39 tooth and 53 tooth chainrings.
Compact cranks have a smaller BCD (bolt circle diameter) that allows smaller rings.  My compact has a 36 tooth small and 50 tooth large chainring.  There are more options for smaller rings on compact cranks too whereas with standard cranks you can only go larger.

With a triple there's a lot of duplicated gears when you start mixing/matching chainring/cassete combinations.  With a compact you get gearing thats really close to a triple in gear range without a bunch of duplicated gears.

competitive racers (pro, cat 1/23, etc) => standard 39/53, everyone else => compact.


Ah, sociopathy. How warm, how comforting, thy sweet embrace. - MNS
[ Parent ]
Thanks. by ObviousTroll (4.00 / 1) #23 Sat Apr 17, 2010 at 10:06:37 AM EST
I'm going to go look at the Sectuer and  the Jamis today.

An Angry and Flatulent Pig, Trying to Tie Balloon Animals
[ Parent ]
I spent around 1100 on mine. by nightflameblue (2.00 / 0) #10 Thu Apr 15, 2010 at 05:32:29 PM EST
Granted that's been a few years ago, but that was all in, pedals, shoes, seat replacement, the works. It was a Giant, aluminum frame, cheap hardware (Sora at the time) because that set had the best wheels for big boys. Trying to remember the original wheels now. CXP 22 or something? I had a wreck and ruined the wheels so can't remember the originals now. Outside of that wreck, I never had any problems with the wheels. Frame's still going strong, though the crank's due for a rebuild at this point.

You can have mine. by ad hoc (4.00 / 1) #11 Thu Apr 15, 2010 at 05:46:02 PM EST
It looks like it's going to be a $4000 piece of modern art for want of a $20 part.
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What part? by hulver (2.00 / 0) #15 Fri Apr 16, 2010 at 12:50:34 AM EST

--
Cheese is not a hat. - clock
[ Parent ]
A derailleur hanger by ad hoc (4.00 / 1) #16 Fri Apr 16, 2010 at 12:05:41 PM EST


From: "derailleurhanger.com" <info@derailleurhanger.com>
Date: April 15, 2010 1:59:14 PM EDT
To: $BIKE_SHOP
Subject: Re: Hanger for Fondriest U 107

Unfortunately we do not have this hanger in our inventory.  We have had many requests for it but as of yet we have not found anyone who manufacturers it.

We apologize that we could not help you this time!

Thanks!

http://derailleurhanger.com
Phone:  +1-303-991-6179
FAX:  +1-303-265-9014
Email:  info@derailleurhanger.com


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[ Parent ]
and I assume by ObviousTroll (2.00 / 0) #18 Fri Apr 16, 2010 at 03:36:46 PM EST
and, of course, the company that made the frame can't help either?




An Angry and Flatulent Pig, Trying to Tie Balloon Animals
[ Parent ]
I doubt it by ad hoc (2.00 / 0) #20 Fri Apr 16, 2010 at 03:52:15 PM EST
I wrote the company, the importer, and the former importer. They only one I've heard back from is the former importer who wanted to sell me leftover inventory (size XL or XXL).

The company was sold a few years ago and I doubt there's much left from "the before time" aside from the name.
--

[ Parent ]
Sigh. by ObviousTroll (2.00 / 0) #21 Fri Apr 16, 2010 at 03:56:08 PM EST
The only thing left would be to take the old one to a machine shop and see if they can replicate it. Probably cost quite a bit, though.


An Angry and Flatulent Pig, Trying to Tie Balloon Animals
[ Parent ]
Marvin's correct by LinDze (2.00 / 0) #13 Thu Apr 15, 2010 at 07:09:17 PM EST
Waaaay too many bikes these days are spec'd for "racing". Which leads to a bunch of compromises against comfort and durability. A Touring, or similar relaxed road bike, is what you're after. Personally I love steel and carbon fiber is 80% gadgetude for these types of uses.

 I have a Long Haul Trucker (my second!) and a Salsa Casseroll. The LHT is great for long slow rides with gear. The Casseroll is quite a bit snappier feeling, but still good for long rides. The drive trains are also significantly different, but match the bike use.

Parts wise the Casseroll comes with a perfect wheelset for you. I have three sets of those Delgados at this point. Never a single issue, including the epic euro cycling trip. The spec on the drivetrain has slipped a bit in the past few years, but still suitable. You may be able to find a new old stock bike with the better spec too.

Anyways, I think the Casseroll is a great match from what youve described.

-Lin Dze
Arbeit Macht Frei

Unfortunately no one sells either of those brands by ObviousTroll (2.00 / 0) #19 Fri Apr 16, 2010 at 03:48:25 PM EST
within hundreds of miles of me; I'm going to try and take a look at marvin's suggestion on Saturday, though. 

An Angry and Flatulent Pig, Trying to Tie Balloon Animals
[ Parent ]
Technically, they don't *stock* those brands by LinDze (2.00 / 0) #24 Sun Apr 18, 2010 at 01:59:19 AM EST
Both brands are actually owned by QBP, which is a ginormous bike part wholesaler. I'd venture a guess that 90% of local bike shops buy a significant amount of gear from QBP. So, at the least, they would be able to order them pretty easily.

Now assuming you want to browse first you may also look at Fuji Touring. They're a perennial favorite among that crowd. KHS is another company that is a solid value with some of their bikes in that price range. Oh! and the Bianchi C2C series! Definitely more flash than my previous suggestions. But its a series of bikes specifically targeting a more comfortable long distance ride while retaining that racer zest.

-Lin Dze
Arbeit Macht Frei

[ Parent ]
and another thing by LinDze (2.00 / 0) #25 Sun Apr 18, 2010 at 02:17:53 AM EST
I just noticed that REI has their Randonee marked down 25%. For $800 thats a really nice spec, and sounds very similar to what you want. As I recall they also have a very good trial period/return policy on their bikes. I'd actually bump that guy to the top of the list for you.

-Lin Dze
Arbeit Macht Frei
[ Parent ]
Hey, bike riders - need an opinion. | 25 comments (25 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback