Print Story in which IKEA makes me feel bad for being single
Health
By riceowlguy (Fri Mar 12, 2010 at 09:54:41 AM EST) (all tags)
Mostly a continuation of the last diary...but also a rant about Obama and healthcare (but perhaps not what you'd expect).


More aventures in home ownership responsibility and furniture assembly: last night, I finally finished putting together one of the two complex box springs that double as storage with their fancy hydraulic hinged tops.  However, once I finished putting the thing together, I found it was simply too heavy for one person, even a real Clydesdale like myself, to lift into place on the bed frame.

I initially felt like IKEA was telling me that a single person should not have bought a king-sized bed, but then I realized that the queen version of this box spring would be even bigger and heavier and single people get queen beds all the time, so I guess it's just that IKEA thinks I should be leaning on my friends more.  Luckily my helpful coworker is going to bail me out of this mess once again.

Did I mention that my parents are coming to visit next weekend, and that this is the bed they'll be sleeping in?  I jokingly told them I should make them put it together themselves before they could sleep.  Now it seems like that's less of a joke because I will likely have to have them help me at least put the second box spring into place once I've finished assembling it, then put the mattress on and sheets, etc. (Helpful Coworker is going on vacation all next week.)

I feel kind of scared, in that this is the first time that I have acquired furniture that I can't deal with at all on my own.  The space under the bed is never getting vacuumed now unless I can get help.

I played about three hours of tennis on Wednesday and it was awesome; it ended with a set between me and my one hardcore practice partner and he took the first three games and then I won six straight to take the set.  He has traditionally been so bad at serving that when he actually does get a decent serve in it's probably a winner because I don't get much practice returning serve.  Those first three games were when he was serving really well.  Next time we play I will make him just hit serves from my ball basket and I will just work on returns.  That should be a win-win.

You know what really improves my mood, honestly?  This is going to sound crazy but it's true: a weekend day spent doing chores around my new house.  Because it reminds me of everything I love about my new house, and everything that sucked about my old place.  I have room, I have space, I have places to put everything, I can do laundry while I work on other things without having to worry about the time and having to go out in the rain or heat or whatever to go get the laundry, etc.

The shine is definitely wearing off the apple with me as far as President Obama is concerned, in case anybody cares.  If I had fifteen minutes to bend his ear on this whole health care thing, I would want to know why he continues to try and sell this thing as a battle between "the American people" and "the insurance companies", and focusing on the plight of the uninsured: a strategy which guarantees massive pushback from the political right, whereas if he laid out the fundamental case that America is paying 50% more for health care than any other country without it making us any healthier; that one of the reasons that American jobs keep getting shipped overseas is that it costs a fortune to provide American workers with health insurance; that insurance companies right now are the only players in the market that have an incentive (maybe) to keep costs down and they haven't been able to because large hospitals and drug companies are even more powerful than they are, and that the whole damn system of multiple providers with multiple complex billing systems is a waste of money - I think you could get support from both sides for a single-payer system.  (You also need to make clear that the federal and state governments are already paying for or at least subsidizing most of the care in this country, whether directly through Medicare/Medicaid or through the tax breaks which make employer-based health benefits attractive to employers.)

People are so scared of "the government" doing things...well, certain things, anyway.  The right seems to have no problem with our socialist, taxpayer-funded military.  But a national health care system?  That's evil!  I actually had a debate with a guy about government and when I pointed out how firefighters, policemen, teachers, sewers, water, roads, and garbage disposal are all government functions, he said "I have private garbagemen paid for by my HOA."  Um, hate to break it to you but the HOA is form of government.  Yes, it's "voluntary"...on the other hand, they all basically have the same rules and since most new neighborhoods have them (at least in Texas), they're pretty inescapable.  So, perhaps it would be better to focus on making the governance better than just sitting back and saying all government is bad.

I suppose given my recent debate with toxicfur in the cellar it might seem weird that I'm arguing for a single-payer system, but it's important to note that I'm arguing for it because it's more efficient for everybody rather than because it would be nice to give poor people health care.

< nothing's sacred | Consigned Conscience >
in which IKEA makes me feel bad for being single | 48 comments (48 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
"Health" "care" - ha. by lolwhat (2.00 / 0) #1 Fri Mar 12, 2010 at 10:29:09 AM EST
The current bill is all about extracting more revenue in an attempt to fill the massive black hole that is the gummint deficit. If it truly were about health care:
  1. Congress wouldn't have exempted themselves from this legislation. They still get their Cadillac plans, and they still get to keep them after they leave office. I'm sorry, but they should eat their own cooking.
  2. The bill wouldn't contain provisions for charging you now, for a promise to receive health care three years from now. See Social Security for how government promises typically work out. Hint: The Supreme Court declared that Social Security funding is a tax. As such, no legally-binding mandate exists for the gummint to make Social Security payments to you. In addition, the gummint can (and indeed does) treat Social Security monies as general revenue.
  3. Speaking of Social Security, the bill wouldn't contain provisions for transferring revenues to Social Security "if necessary." Guess what? Social Security is now cash-flow negative - so, you can bet the gummint will deem it necessary right the fuck away after this passes. Combine this little detail with point 2 above, and anyone with a brain can see where this is going.
  4. Congress wouldn't be trying to get this passed through reconciliation. "[T]he reconciliation process is utilized when Congress issues directives to legislate policy changes in mandatory spending (entitlements) or revenue programs (tax laws) to achieve the goals in spending and revenue contemplated by the budget resolution." You couldn't - or wouldn't be supposed to, anyway - use reconciliation for this bill if it weren't a pure money play.
  5. Pelosi wouldn't be spouting bullshit like, "We have to pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it." Uh, no, that's not how it's supposed to work.
Can you tell I don't trust the gummint to do the right thing - especially in this situation?
--
If cigarette packs are required to have pictures of diseased lungs, college brochures should be required to have photos of grads working at Starbucks.
the deficit by dmg (4.00 / 1) #21 Sat Mar 13, 2010 at 03:58:03 PM EST
The herd of elephants in the living room that have come home to roost...

--
dmg - HuSi's most dimwitted overprivileged user.
[ Parent ]
Obvious troll is obvious by riceowlguy (2.00 / 0) #46 Tue Mar 16, 2010 at 10:43:46 AM EST
Using the non-word "gummint" when you obviously otherwise have good language skills is kind of a giveaway.  To your points, however:
  1. I agree they should eat their own cooking, but congress ALWAYS exempts themselves from the laws they pass.  It's just automatic at this point.  So I don't know as this makes it obvious this bill is more about revenue than about health care.
  2. Every government takes taxes before services are available, e.g. for major infrastructure projects that take time to build.
  3. In general, "lockboxes" (thanks Al Gore) seem like a bad idea...I worked for a university department for a while were every part of the budget was compartmentalized and it made it really hard to do things.  Put it all in a big pool and use it for what it's needed for.
  4. I think congress is trying to get it passed through reconciliation because the Obama administration has basically decided that this is going to be their one make or break issue, for better or for worse, and since the Scott Brown thing, they're in a bind.
  5. Yeah, that does sound like bullshit.
Now, to the general statement of "it's more about money than healthcare", if you listen to the This American Life episodes "More is Less" and "Someone Else's Money", I think it becomes clear that the healthcare issue has been about money from the start.  If health care got cheaper and cheaper every year like computers and food (historically, relative to family incomes), we wouldn't be complaining about the uninsured not being able to afford it.  So, of course it is about money.  Governments need money to provide services.  Period.

[ Parent ]
It isn't nice by Gedvondur (2.00 / 0) #2 Fri Mar 12, 2010 at 10:43:49 AM EST
It isn't nice to give poor people health care, it is essential.

It is part of the burden of being a good society, even if people take advantage of it.



Gedvondur

"I have a high threshold for taking it in the bum..." - MissTrish
I think a good question by sasquatchan (2.00 / 0) #3 Fri Mar 12, 2010 at 10:50:58 AM EST
is a philosophical one: what is the purpose of the state ?

Alas, answering it can lead into endless nit-picking detail (see the EU constitution). I like that the US Constitution lays what should be a simple set of rules, though interpretation of them has led to interesting results (equal protection, interstate commerce among others..) and some flawed actions (prohibition).

My favorite philosophical question by riceowlguy (4.00 / 2) #4 Fri Mar 12, 2010 at 12:13:16 PM EST
is "Who gets the flute?"  I don't know how well-known this little parable is so I'll be embarrassed if everybody's already heard about this and my explanation is redundant, but here's my version of it: Alexis, Beth and Christy are arguing over a beautiful flute.  Alexis made the flute, and therefore argues that she should be able to keep it because she created it and it wouldn't exist if it wasn't for her.  Beth argues that she is very poor, the child of a broken home, and has always wanted a flute like that, and therefore she should have the flute because it would make her the happiest.  Christy argues that she's the only one who actually knows how to play the flute, and therefore she should have it because it's not doing the others any good.

I come firmly down on Christy's side in this debate and it kind of informs my opinions on things in politics these days...that and my obsession with economics, 'the dismal science', or at least NPR's Planet Money, ever since the mortgage implosion began in late 2007.

[ Parent ]
I agree, Christy's use-rights should triumph by infinitera (4.00 / 1) #5 Fri Mar 12, 2010 at 12:18:38 PM EST

[…] a professional layabout. Which I aspire to be, but am not yet. — CheeseburgerBrown

[ Parent ]
It's still Alexis' flute. by ammoniacal (4.00 / 2) #6 Fri Mar 12, 2010 at 02:14:48 PM EST
Beth and Christy are pushing their luck with that forced wealth transferrance programme (notice how they have offered no compensation to Alexis) and will be first against the wall when the counter-revolution comes.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
It's a parable by riceowlguy (2.00 / 0) #10 Fri Mar 12, 2010 at 02:45:22 PM EST
about the concept of justice.  Many people say they are fighting for justice or fairness; the philosopher who originally posed the flute question did it to illustrate the fact that you can't define justice or fairness without wrestling with some pretty fundamental questions.

I think the question is a good litmus test to use to get people's reactions and see what their concept of fairness and justice is.  People differ on what is fair.  Here's another way of putting it: who should pay for city services?  Person A might say "everybody should pay the same amount, as that is fair".  Person B might say "people who have more money can more easily afford it, so they should  pay more, since that is fair".  Person C might say "the people should pay in proportion to how much they use the services, since that is fair."  Who is right?  It's not clear to me at first glance what is most "fair".  On the other hand, from an economic standpoint, option B produces the best results (so goes the theory): no inefficiency of running around trying to figure out who used what service more or less, and you're raising less money, relatively, from those who have less, so consumer spending is impacted less negatively than it would be if you charged everybody the same.

[ Parent ]
Humans are pretty good at by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #14 Fri Mar 12, 2010 at 03:46:12 PM EST
measuring and metering things, so I'm inclined to disagree with your inefficiency statement. I, of course, support Option C and I would take it another step by levying a surcharge on visitors who freeload on the backs of our hard-working citizens.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
Alexis can use the flute too. by Beechwood 45789 (4.00 / 2) #8 Fri Mar 12, 2010 at 02:20:27 PM EST
She can sell it. So long as it has value, it has the potential to be useful to whoever has it.


[ Parent ]
nononono! by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #9 Fri Mar 12, 2010 at 02:28:45 PM EST
On Planet Ged, lazy-arsed Beth and Christy are fucking ENTITLED to Alexis' shit, because she's not using it at the moment!

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
From whence came the materials . . . by lm (2.00 / 0) #20 Sat Mar 13, 2010 at 01:10:08 PM EST
. . . from which Alexis made the flute?

Unless Alexis made the flute from mud formed from her own scat and urine, there is an open question as to why she should have a privileged claim to that which was produced by her labor. What if the flute was made from a bone from a fowl killed by Beth or from a reed collected by Christy?


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
It came from a downed tree by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #27 Sat Mar 13, 2010 at 09:31:42 PM EST
which God saw fit to blow down in Alexis' backyard.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
But she made it in someone else's machine shop by lm (2.00 / 0) #30 Sun Mar 14, 2010 at 04:18:14 PM EST
Since that other person owned the means by which it was produced, doesn't that other person own the product?

There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
If it was . . . by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #32 Sun Mar 14, 2010 at 05:27:17 PM EST
then I'm certain that she struck an equitable deal with the shop's owner.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
Like work for hire? by lm (2.00 / 0) #33 Sun Mar 14, 2010 at 06:15:21 PM EST
If so, it means the flute isn't hers but the shop owners,  no?

There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
You can rent shop time. by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #35 Sun Mar 14, 2010 at 10:50:43 PM EST
That's a fair Free-market concept isn't it?

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
Sure by lm (2.00 / 0) #37 Mon Mar 15, 2010 at 05:00:01 AM EST
But if you can stipulate that private property already obtains, and thereby beg the question in one way, I I can stipulate that Alexis was paid to produce the flute so as to beg the question in another way.

There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
Work for Hire rubs me wrong. by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #38 Mon Mar 15, 2010 at 07:03:29 AM EST
Hypothetically, I concede your point - but I would encourage Alexis to not offer creative services for assembly-line wages. It's abusive to the employee.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
All of what you say by jayhawk88 (4.00 / 1) #7 Fri Mar 12, 2010 at 02:15:46 PM EST
About Healthcare is true, but it's also mildly complicated to explain, which, in this day and age, means it might as well be Sanskrit Calculus. If you want to get anywhere in American politics these days, you need a villain, and you need either a hero or a downtrodden, and you have to be able to sell it within 30 seconds before Beck or Madow cut you off.

That's the main thing I'm disappointed in by riceowlguy (2.00 / 0) #11 Fri Mar 12, 2010 at 03:07:43 PM EST
I thought that we might finally get a President who didn't treat us like children, and who was more interested in being right than in winning.  I should have known better.

[ Parent ]
I think he was pretty interested in being right by garlic (2.00 / 0) #41 Mon Mar 15, 2010 at 05:58:24 PM EST
Seperation of powers means he mostly shouldn't have to much to do with the legislative branch beyond signing or vetoing what they pass. Having been a Senator he seemed to want to try doing this the first year.


[ Parent ]
Yep by riceowlguy (2.00 / 0) #44 Tue Mar 16, 2010 at 09:50:31 AM EST
I heard a congressman saying the same thing about the financial reform bill..."I can't go back to my district and say 'we need to make sure that derivatives are traded on an open exchange, rather then being over-the-counter instruments, in order to limit systemic risk by ensuring that each financial institution can evaluate the risk position of other financial institutions'.  I'd get a sea of blank faces.  Instead I have to say 'Bankers are bad!  Wall street is bad!  Vote for me!'".

[ Parent ]
Obama and change by lm (2.00 / 0) #12 Fri Mar 12, 2010 at 03:16:35 PM EST
I heard a guy on CSPAN radio yesterday (I think) who drew a parallel between President Obama and Chief Justice Roberts. He said that Roberts stated that he wanted to work with both liberal and conservative justices to make a new way forward. Likewise, Obama campaigned on doing business inside the beltway in a new way. But Roberts' plan got sunk by the `liberal' judges who viewed him as attempting to impose `conservative' policy and united in their opposition to the conservative platform and Obama's plan got sunk by conservative legislators who united in their opposition to Obama's `liberal' platform.

I think there is some truth to that analysis.

I also think it true that many on the left imposed their own view of Obama on his relatively blank slate. The only folks I saw claiming that Obama was a liberal during the campaign were either to the left or to the right of where Obama actually stood. So it's no surprise that those to his left should now have a bit of buyer's remorse. While some may have held their noses and voted for him as the least of the bad options, I suspect that most voted for him more because of projecting their own views on him than for where he actually stood.

And, at any rate, we're only a year into his term. I suspect that any changes that have been made won't become apparent until year two or year three. A nation the size of the US doesn't turn on a dime. It takes a while for policy to take effect and longer for the results of that policy to become apparent.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
Well by riceowlguy (2.00 / 0) #13 Fri Mar 12, 2010 at 03:25:22 PM EST
If the Republicans run Palin, I'm sure as hell still voting for Obama.  It will be interesting to see if he gets a serious challenge from within the Democratic Party.  I'm assuming not, but we're far from there yet.  Well, actually, we're probably less than a year away.  Shit.


[ Parent ]
I really want to see Palin run in 2012 by lm (2.00 / 0) #15 Fri Mar 12, 2010 at 03:52:31 PM EST
That would be the the most awesome election cycle that I've ever experienced, even better than Perot's smackdown of Clinton in the 1992 debates. Even more awesome would obtain if it were a Palin/Limbaugh ticket.

There will be no serious challenge to Obama from the Democratic party in 2012 unless the economy absolutely tanks between now and then. The Democratic party is the party of weak tea. They are quite fortunate to have Obama.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
Why not vote for a actual by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #16 Fri Mar 12, 2010 at 03:55:18 PM EST
progressive Democrat? You know? The kind that their platform claims they support, and not a nation-crushing, apologetic centrist.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
because kucinich is kooky by infinitera (4.00 / 1) #17 Fri Mar 12, 2010 at 04:02:24 PM EST
And nobody else tries.

I did vote for Nader - but Gore won MA despite me.

[…] a professional layabout. Which I aspire to be, but am not yet. — CheeseburgerBrown

[ Parent ]
Have you read the Democratic party platform? by lm (4.00 / 1) #18 Sat Mar 13, 2010 at 08:41:19 AM EST
It's isn't really all that progressive.

But aside from that, kindly name the last progressive Democratic candidate that received more than 10% of the vote during the primary season.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
(Comment Deleted) by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #22 Sat Mar 13, 2010 at 05:32:07 PM EST

This comment has been deleted by ammoniacal



[ Parent ]
At the presidential level? by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #23 Sat Mar 13, 2010 at 05:32:51 PM EST
I'd define LBJ as the last successful progressive presidential candidate. How were Kucinich's numbers?

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
Nixon was progressive compared to today's Dems by lm (4.00 / 2) #24 Sat Mar 13, 2010 at 06:09:38 PM EST
I don't recall Kucinish ever breaking single digits this last time around. IIRC, he scored less than 2% in New Hampshire, didn't get a single delegate from the Iowa caucasus and dropped out before Nevada. But I'm doing that from memory rather than from looking stuff up.

There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
That's a shame. by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #26 Sat Mar 13, 2010 at 09:11:26 PM EST
At this point of middle-age, I'm really sick of centrist policies.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
the media labels anything else crazy by infinitera (4.00 / 1) #29 Sun Mar 14, 2010 at 03:44:51 PM EST
And most people nod along.

Although Republicans and their megaphones have been moderately successful in tilting the dial on a number of issues.

Freedom of the press, for those that own one.

[…] a professional layabout. Which I aspire to be, but am not yet. — CheeseburgerBrown

[ Parent ]
Because that's not what I want by riceowlguy (2.00 / 0) #47 Tue Mar 16, 2010 at 10:49:45 AM EST
I am not a traditional "corporations are evil, poor people are automatically more noble than rich people, historically downtrodden minorities need our help" kind of progressive Democrat.  I'm a "I'm tired of having the Bible binge used as the basis for our policies, and I'm tired of having politicians pretend that being smart and well-educated is somehow a mis-qualification for political office" kind of centrist non-Republican.

[ Parent ]
The NY Times put it far better than I did by lm (2.00 / 0) #19 Sat Mar 13, 2010 at 10:24:02 AM EST
In the middle an article on Rahmbo, the NY Times made the point I was trying to make much more succinctly:
When Obama ran for the presidency, liberals saw him as the crusading head of a movement to sweep in a new era of progressive policies on health care, climate change and national security, while independents and some Republicans saw him as a sort of postpartisan figure who would reach across party lines and end the ideological polarization of Washington. Inevitably, of course, he could not be both. Instead he has managed to disappoint both sets of believers.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
Re: any changes by lolwhat (4.00 / 1) #25 Sat Mar 13, 2010 at 08:38:31 PM EST
Actually, some people have predicted that rather serious economic problems will make themselves apparent before the end of this year - and that's not counting the passage of "health" "care" "reform." The gummint needs more money RIGHT. THE. FUCK. NOW. The "health" "care" "reform" taxes will be levied RIGHT. THE. FUCK. NOW. These levies will NOT be small - especially given that many Americans are short on cash at the moment. But hey - from each according to his ability, to each according to his needs, right?
--
If cigarette packs are required to have pictures of diseased lungs, college brochures should be required to have photos of grads working at Starbucks.
[ Parent ]
that's communism by infinitera (2.00 / 0) #28 Sun Mar 14, 2010 at 03:40:49 PM EST
Socialism is from each according to his ability, to each according to his deeds.

[…] a professional layabout. Which I aspire to be, but am not yet. — CheeseburgerBrown

[ Parent ]
What about fascism? (nt) by lolwhat (2.00 / 0) #31 Sun Mar 14, 2010 at 05:09:44 PM EST

--
If cigarette packs are required to have pictures of diseased lungs, college brochures should be required to have photos of grads working at Starbucks.
[ Parent ]
what about it? by infinitera (2.00 / 0) #34 Sun Mar 14, 2010 at 08:21:19 PM EST
This thread isn't about military tribunals, enemy combatants, the patriot act, or executive branch-created torture programs.

Health care reform contains no new government powers, nor does it remove the government from any scrutiny in its exercise. It uses run-of-the-mill regulatory means. If you believe regulation and legislation are fascism, your reality is very strange.

[…] a professional layabout. Which I aspire to be, but am not yet. — CheeseburgerBrown

[ Parent ]
about that . . . by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #36 Sun Mar 14, 2010 at 11:31:48 PM EST
There is a flavor of reform that is modelled upon the UKian NHS, which makes "the gov" the health care provider.

I understand we do that now for indians and soldiers, but as a survivor of the latter, I can vouch that the way America will run an NHS-style option for the public will suck.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
yeah, I like the canadian way better by infinitera (4.00 / 1) #39 Mon Mar 15, 2010 at 08:15:27 AM EST
Private entities, public insurance. Rather than have the government employ the doctors and own the hospital.

[…] a professional layabout. Which I aspire to be, but am not yet. — CheeseburgerBrown

[ Parent ]
I could support that method. by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #40 Mon Mar 15, 2010 at 02:24:10 PM EST
I would prefer that the health-care orgs be non-profits.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
Isn't BCBS non-profit? by garlic (2.00 / 0) #42 Mon Mar 15, 2010 at 06:03:11 PM EST


[ Parent ]
I dunno. by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #43 Mon Mar 15, 2010 at 09:01:44 PM EST
You jus' keep yer book-larnin' to yourself, Mister.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
Really? by riceowlguy (2.00 / 0) #45 Tue Mar 16, 2010 at 09:53:17 AM EST
I've heard other people saying that the VA medical system is a-ok.  Are you comfortable getting into specifics without talking about your medical history (if any)?  I totally understand if you don't.

[ Parent ]
It's bad here. by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #48 Tue Mar 16, 2010 at 05:30:09 PM EST
I'd only go there if I had cancer, because it's marginally better than going untreated. If I was seen before dying, that is.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
in which IKEA makes me feel bad for being single | 48 comments (48 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback