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Help!
By xth (Mon May 18, 2009 at 05:59:43 AM EST) (all tags)
Do you know any free / cheap .NET customizable CMSs built in C#?


So far my short list includes Umbraco, Ektron, Kentico, MojoPortal, Rainbow. We are avoiding DNN. Is there any other one you know of you could recommend?

It shouldn't cost more than 10/15 grands (give or take).

Thanks.

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Ask Husi | 15 comments (15 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
Sharepoint does that. by wiredog (4.00 / 1) #1 Mon May 18, 2009 at 07:01:55 AM EST
And it has .Net hooks.

Earth First!
(We can strip mine the rest later.)

We use Sharepoint - it's great by Herring (4.00 / 1) #2 Mon May 18, 2009 at 07:15:15 AM EST
A truly marvellous way of hiding information. People hassling you for documentation? "It's in Sharepoint".

We used to keep all our documentation in the source control system so we knew where to find it, we knew who edited it and when. Because our new dev manager doesn't understand source control, it's all in Sharepoint. Somewhere.


christ, we're all old now - StackyMcRacky

[ Parent ]
Quite by xth (2.00 / 0) #3 Mon May 18, 2009 at 07:22:24 AM EST
Sharepoint is too much for us. I'm sure there are specialists who can do it well, but I've only ever heard complaints about it.

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[ Parent ]
sharepoint is amazingly powerful by sasquatchan (2.00 / 0) #4 Mon May 18, 2009 at 08:26:38 AM EST
but in the chainsaw sense, maybe.. You can make extravagant carvings and totems with a chain saw, slice your leg open, you can cut down big trees with a chain saw, behead a zombie with a chainsaw, put a chain saw on your stump of an arm to fight evil dead,  etc.

SPS is like that -- can do so darn many things, actually getting it to do anything can be a huge pain in the ass..

[ Parent ]
Poor comparison by marvin (2.00 / 0) #14 Mon May 18, 2009 at 09:20:42 PM EST
My Husqvarna resents your comparison with Sharepoint, and it would like to have a few words with you out behind the woodshed, where nobody will hear you scream.

[ Parent ]
Why does your CMS have ot be .Net? by wiredog (2.00 / 0) #5 Mon May 18, 2009 at 09:16:26 AM EST
Subversion integrates well with Visual Studio, ClearCase integrates decently.

Heck, MS Source Safe does OK.

This asssumes you're looking at source control, instead of Document Management...

Earth First!
(We can strip mine the rest later.)

[ Parent ]
.NET is a client requirement by xth (2.00 / 0) #7 Mon May 18, 2009 at 09:21:57 AM EST
I should have been more clear - I assume everyone understands 'CMS' the same way. I mean a web CMS, i.e. a system to manage web pages, assets, publishing workflows, multiple languages. Basically, something like Joomla, but in .NET.

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[ Parent ]
a client requirement by wiredog (2.00 / 0) #8 Mon May 18, 2009 at 09:29:47 AM EST
Oh, well, you're fucked then.

Earth First!
(We can strip mine the rest later.)

[ Parent ]
That goes without saying by xth (2.00 / 0) #9 Mon May 18, 2009 at 09:34:27 AM EST
Clients - you can't live with them, etc

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[ Parent ]
That's how we use it, too... by wiredog (2.00 / 0) #6 Mon May 18, 2009 at 09:18:34 AM EST
But that's because mgmt and #$Customer want it that way.

Over at NOAA they used it properly. One guy managed it, it had actual user access controls for the various sections set up, documents had to be checked in and out, with Track Changes turned on, etc.

But it does make it really easy to use it as the MS version of a Wiki.

Earth First!
(We can strip mine the rest later.)

[ Parent ]
Funny you should say that by gpig (2.00 / 0) #10 Mon May 18, 2009 at 11:16:17 AM EST
since my only real memory of working with SharePoint was sitting in front of it thinking, why the heck did you not just set up a wiki?

Interestingly, the one time I was asked to set up a CMS, I did a comprehensive survey of user requirements and then installed a wiki. This plus my SharePoint experience leads me to one of two conclusions, either

1. A wiki is actually sufficient for some situations where users or management are convinced they need a 'proper' CMS

or

2. I like wikis a lot

.... or both, of course.
---
(,   ,') -- eep

[ Parent ]
A Wiki /is/ a CMS by wiredog (2.00 / 0) #11 Mon May 18, 2009 at 11:25:20 AM EST
A very generic CMS, to be sure, but it was originally designed to be a CMS.

Earth First!
(We can strip mine the rest later.)

[ Parent ]
True by gpig (2.00 / 0) #13 Mon May 18, 2009 at 12:20:48 PM EST
I think my mind has been trained to recognise 'CMS' as something more heavyweight, but you're right, wikis do manage content ....
---
(,   ,') -- eep
[ Parent ]
yes but... by xth (2.00 / 0) #12 Mon May 18, 2009 at 11:25:22 AM EST
...do they go wooosh!! ?

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[ Parent ]
remind me to tell you by dr k (2.00 / 0) #15 Tue May 19, 2009 at 03:50:42 AM EST
about the time I worked for a LAMP shop which used Sharepoint for project documentation... and defect tracking. And, oh yeah, all the developers were using Linux desktops, so all the assorted IE features of Sharepoint were inaccessible. Like the ActiveX-based document uploading tool. And the Outlook calendar.

:| :| :| :| :|

[ Parent ]
Ask Husi | 15 comments (15 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback