Print Story Audiobooks of 2009
Diary
By toxicfur (Wed Dec 30, 2009 at 05:19:54 PM EST) (all tags)
With inspiration from Theophile Escargot, I kept track of all the books -- audiobooks and print -- that I read last year. Though I'm sure I forgot a book here or there, presented below is as close to a comprehensive list of all the audiobooks I listened to the past year, with links to audible.com (note: audible can only sell particular things within a particular country. I think some of my links go to the UK version. *shrug*).

Tomorrow, I'll list the print books I read this year.



Notable: I (sadly) managed to finish the Discworld series, so far as I know, and I love them all, in their own way. Thud! was a particular favorite, and I'll likely re-listen to Hogfather again and again. I made it all the way through The Count of Monte Cristo, which, though enjoyable at times, was quite a slog to focus on during my commute. I love to listen to Neil Gaiman telling me stories, and I discovered that I quite enjoy Heinlein, when he isn't being overtly political. And I listened to Kafka's The Trial shortly before embarking on a Kafkaesque task at work, and the absurdity of the whole thing helped me get through it without losing my mind.

Statistics:
Total audiobooks: 39
Number that were a re-listen: 11
Number that I'd previously read as a print book: 7

Key:
r = Re-listened. I previously listened to this particular audiobook.
df = Different format. I previously read this as a print book.

  1. Stardust, Neil Gaiman, narrated by Neil Gaiman (r, df)
  2. Fragile Things, Neil Gaiman, narrated by Neil Gaiman (r, df)
  3. The Lincoln-Douglas Debates, Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas, narrated by David Straithairn and Richard Dreyfuss
  4. The Graveyard Book, Neil Gaiman, narrated by Neil Gaiman (r, df)
  5. Pyramids, Terry Pratchett, narrated by Nigel Planer (r)
  6. METAtropolis, Jay Lake, Tobias Buckell, Elizabeth Bear, John Scalzi, Karl Schroeder, narrated by Michael Hogan, Scott Brick, Kandyse McClure, Alessandro Juliani, Stefan Rudnicki, John Scalzi
  7. The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, F. Scott Fitzgerald, narrated by B.J. Harrison
  8. Jingo, Terry Pratchett, narrated by Nigel Planer
  9. The Exit Door Leads In, Philip K. Dick, narrated by Paul Michael Garcia
  10. Those Who Seek Forgiveness, Laurell K. Hamilton, narrated by ?? (no longer available on audible)
  11. 3:10 to Yuma, Elmore Leonard, narrated by Henry Rollins
  12. The Namesake, Jhumpa Lahiri, narrated by Sarita Choudhury
  13. Guards! Guards!, Terry Pratchett, narrated by Nigel Planer (r)
  14. The Last Continent, Terry Pratchett, narrated by Nigel Planer
  15. Mother Night, Kurt Vonnegut, narrated by Victor Bevine
  16. The Trial, Franz Kafka, narrated by Geoffrey Howard
  17. Hogfather, Terry Pratchett, narrated by Nigel Planer (r)
  18. Neverwhere, Neil Gaiman, narrated by Neil Gaiman (r, df)
  19. The Fifth Elephant, Terry Pratchett, narrated by Stephen Briggs
  20. M is for Magic, Neil Gaiman, narrated by Neil Gaiman (r, df)
  21. The Truth, Terry Pratchett, narrated by Stephen Briggs
  22. Moving Pictures, Terry Pratchett, narrated by Nigel Planer (r)
  23. Starman Jones, Robert A. Heinlein, narrated by Paul Michael Garcia
  24. Night Watch, Terry Pratchett, narrated by Stephen Briggs
  25. Lords and Ladies, Terry Pratchett, narrated by Nigel Planer
  26. The Count of Monte Cristo, Alexander Dumas, narrated by John Lee
  27. The Wee Free Men, Terry Pratchett, narrated by Stephen Briggs
  28. Monstrous Regiment, Terry Pratchett, narrated by Stephen Briggs
  29. A Hat Full of Sky, Terry Pratchett, narrated by Stephen Briggs
  30. Coraline, Neil Gaiman, narrated by Neil Gaiman (r, df)
  31. Men at Arms, Terry Pratchett, narrated by Nigel Planer (r)
  32. Going PostalTerry Pratchett, Stephen Briggs
  33. Thud!, Terry Pratchett, narrated by Stephen Briggs
  34. Wintersmith, Terry Pratchett, narrated by Stephen Briggs
  35. Making Money, Terry Pratchett, narrated by Stephen Briggs
  36. Unseen Academicals, Terry Pratchett, narrated by Stephen Briggs
  37. Good Omens, Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett, narrated by Martin Jarvis (df)
  38. Thief of Time, Terry Pratchett, narrated by Stephen Briggs
  39. Carpe Jugulum, Terry Pratchett, narrated by Nigel Planer
< let the peasants rejoice | Books for next year. >
Audiobooks of 2009 | 10 comments (10 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
I think bo linked to by Scrymarch (2.00 / 0) #1 Wed Dec 30, 2009 at 07:18:52 PM EST
This article about the difficulties of translating Kafka, which I thought was kind of cool.

The translator's trial begins with the first sentence, in part because the uncertainty so subtly introduced by the subjunctive verb "h├Ątte[n]" is inevitably lost in the standard translation, even with E.M. Butler's later revisions: "Someone must have been telling lies about Joseph K., for without having done anything wrong he was arrested one fine morning." Although in this version it is by no means clear why Josef K. has been arrested, there seems to be little doubt about his innocence. The German subjunctive verb, however, tends to undermine this reading. Of course nothing is ever that simple in Kafka, even in translation, and we might argue that since the information received is filtered through Josef K.'s own mind from the very beginning, it is constantly suspect in any case. On a strictly literal level, however, the standard English translation appears to declare K.'s innocence far too strongly.

How were the Lincoln-Douglas debates? They seem particularly well suited to an audio book format.

Will sig for food

I knew that Kafka was nortoriously difficult by toxicfur (2.00 / 0) #2 Wed Dec 30, 2009 at 07:32:11 PM EST
But I don't think I read the article BlueOregon linked to. I found The Trial to be a good listen, though, if only for the pure sense of frustration that came through right from the beginning.

The Lincoln-Douglas debates were excellent, even though they did go on and on and on, after a while -- in many cases, they were covering the same material again and again. The readers did a fantastic job, though, and I know I would not have actually sat down to read them through as carefully as I listened to them.
--
The amount of suck that you can put up with can be mind-boggling, but it only really hits you when it then ceases to suck. -- Kellnerin

[ Parent ]
Cool by Scrymarch (2.00 / 0) #3 Wed Dec 30, 2009 at 07:57:09 PM EST
I guess some of the repetition must come from the fact they were covering similar topics over and again in front of different audiences.

Will sig for food

[ Parent ]
Yes, exactly. by toxicfur (4.00 / 1) #4 Wed Dec 30, 2009 at 07:59:43 PM EST
What was interesting to me was how the similar topics evolved (or didn't) as they went from place to place. The style of the debates was also pretty fascinating -- there were no soundbites as we know them today in the 1800s, but there were a fair amount of zingers and good one-liners.
--
The amount of suck that you can put up with can be mind-boggling, but it only really hits you when it then ceases to suck. -- Kellnerin
[ Parent ]
How was the Good Omens narration? by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #5 Thu Dec 31, 2009 at 01:43:21 AM EST
That might be fun to do again in an audio format.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

Martin Jarvis is very good by toxicfur (4.00 / 1) #6 Thu Dec 31, 2009 at 07:40:28 AM EST
It took me a while to get the voice of Adam I had in my head replaced by Jarvis's version, but once I did, it worked beautifully. It's one of those I'll listen to again.
--
The amount of suck that you can put up with can be mind-boggling, but it only really hits you when it then ceases to suck. -- Kellnerin
[ Parent ]
If you like Neil Gaiman, by mrgoat (4.00 / 1) #7 Thu Dec 31, 2009 at 07:43:39 AM EST
I think you'd like some Terry Prat-

Oh. Right. ;)

--top hat--

how long is your commute? by garlic (2.00 / 0) #8 Fri Jan 22, 2010 at 10:59:13 AM EST
I like escape pod and podcastle, but the longer (~1 hour) stories are too long for my commute, and hard to get through the entire thing without losing my spot for some reason or other. i have a cheapo shuffle, so if I lose my spot it's difficult to find again, so I typically just give up. do you have losing your spot issues? how do you deal with them?


My commute is 30-45 minutes each way. by toxicfur (2.00 / 0) #9 Fri Jan 22, 2010 at 11:45:52 AM EST
I have the 80GB iPod "classic" or some such thing -- the iPod with video and all that. It tags the audiobooks in some way so that if I go off and do something else (like listen to music or a podcast), it remembers where I am. I've gotten pretty good at listening to a book for a chunk of time and then getting back into it the next time I listen to it, though I do find that really complicated books or highly "literary" books (and short fiction) are much more difficult to listen to.

I used to listen to escape pod and podcastle all the time - I'm not quite sure why I stopped.
--
The amount of suck that you can put up with can be mind-boggling, but it only really hits you when it then ceases to suck. -- Kellnerin

[ Parent ]
part of the issue I have by garlic (2.00 / 0) #10 Fri Jan 22, 2010 at 01:26:33 PM EST
is plugging my ipod into the computer seems to make it forget where I'm at in the longer stories so it makes refinding it without a screen pretty tough.


[ Parent ]
Audiobooks of 2009 | 10 comments (10 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback