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By webwench (Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 09:39:44 AM EST) (all tags)
I got a food dehydrator...


...with intentions to bring dehydrated fruits, veggies, and jerky on our September trip, for camp meals and snacks.

So far we've dried steak (teriyaki jerky!), carrots, tomatoes, apples, bell peppers, and strawberries with good success... the bananas were less successful.

Next I will experiment with dehydrating cooked noodles and rice, then hydrating/re-cooking and seeing how that comes out. And then the exciting worlds of beans, berries, and granola await.

So... does anyone do much camping and have some make-ahead recipes they would like to share? We have cookware and use a Brunton stove for cooking, not usually cooking over a fire although we may try that at some point on our trip.

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Ask HuSi: Happy campers' road food? | 37 comments (37 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
wait, what ? by sasquatchan (2.00 / 0) #1 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 09:49:44 AM EST
Next I will experiment with dehydrating cooked noodles and rice, then hydrating/re-cooking and seeing how that comes out. And then the exciting worlds of beans, ... and granola await.

Now you're just trollerizing us.

Howzem wheel wells ? Any rust ?

YES by StackyMcRacky (4.00 / 1) #2 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 09:55:19 AM EST
first, we use a lot of the recipes from "Lip-Smackin' Backpackin'"  Good stuff in that book.

Second, check out this for more ideas.

Oh, and Kooger's Granola in the Lip Smackin' book is TO DIE FOR!

We typically make all of our backpacking food in the spring (read: do all the dehydrating etc) and use it as both trail meals AND as emergency hurricane food (haven't had to use it as such yet, but it's there).

ooh, nice site link by webwench (2.00 / 0) #8 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 11:51:14 AM EST
thanks!!

Getting more attention than you since 1998. Ya ya!

[ Parent ]
banananananananas by Vulch (2.00 / 0) #3 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 09:58:43 AM EST

Local whole foods emporium sells two sorts of dried banana. The type made from normal bananas are thin (3mm, 1/8th inch) slices and are hard and not discoloured. I think they're dipped in a sugar solution first which helps with the colour and solidity. The other type land up brown and floppy but start out as a different and smaller sort or banana.

ours came out kind of brown and squishy by webwench (2.00 / 0) #9 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 11:52:35 AM EST
I think because we cut the slices too thick. They were still tasty, so I ate some, and they made my tummy, um, 'unhappy' shall we say.

Getting more attention than you since 1998. Ya ya!

[ Parent ]
I make lots of fruit leather by ucblockhead (4.00 / 1) #4 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 10:36:56 AM EST
Mostly things that grow in our yard, like plums and peaches. Peaches make really good fruit leather.

I've also made fig, which tastes good, but tends to take forever and be too sticky.
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[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman

how long does it keep? by webwench (2.00 / 0) #10 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 11:54:01 AM EST
I'd like to try that soon. I read that applesauce can be made into a tasty rollup, also, is this true?

Getting more attention than you since 1998. Ya ya!

[ Parent ]
I'm not sure. by ucblockhead (4.00 / 1) #13 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 12:31:46 PM EST
Forever in a freezer. (We make a year's supply every summer and throw it in there.) Probably for days or weeks outside of one. Applesauce works great as a base and sweetener. For instance, our plum tree produces plums that are a bit tart, but when cut half and half with applesauce, the resulting leather is great.
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[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
[ Parent ]
tart plums? by gzt (4.00 / 1) #28 Tue Aug 05, 2008 at 05:18:58 AM EST
Try making tkemali http://www.aboutgeorgia.net/cuisine/souces.html?page=7

trust me on this one.

[ Parent ]
Hmmmm by ucblockhead (2.00 / 0) #30 Tue Aug 05, 2008 at 06:45:07 AM EST
I'll bookmark that. Damn, I wish I'd seen that a week ago. Sadly all this year's plums are all gone. We even grew garlic, mint and cilantro this year...
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[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
[ Parent ]
Cantaloupes! by debacle (4.00 / 1) #5 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 11:00:49 AM EST
Fuck yeah!

Noodles/rice - you need to get to the right spot. Too much, too brittle, not enough, go bad. The right spot is really like only a 1-2 hour window.

Granola is still easier in the oven. Beans are probably not worth it - beans are cheap.

Watermelon tastes good, but takes for ever and I doubt it would last a weekend. Tomatoes are good, but they take a while too. On the plus side, you can dehydrate them only 50%-ish and they then have a much smaller footprint in the freezer (but still can go right into a sauce).

Not sure what else I'd suggest. Blueberries are hard, because they dehydrate into rocks rather than raisins.


IF YOU HAVE TWO FIRLES THOROWNF MONEY ART SUOCIDE GIRLS STRIPPER HPW CAN YPUS :OSE?!?!?!?(elcevisides).

OK, I still don't get it by sasquatchan (2.00 / 0) #6 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 11:15:51 AM EST
beans, noodles and rice come already de-hydrated (dried).

Sure, beans you gotta soak for a long time if they are dried.. So what do you gain by cooking then drying them back out ? That's the basis of my trollerizing accusation.. Shorter cooking time ? Less water needed ?


[ Parent ]
shorter cooking time by webwench (2.00 / 0) #7 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 11:50:32 AM EST
is the big one. Dry beans take a really long time to (1) pre-soak, and (2) cook. The idea is to pre-soak, cook, then dehydrate, so that 'on da trail' you can 'deploy' them 'quickly'.

Getting more attention than you since 1998. Ya ya!

[ Parent ]
Because by ad hoc (4.00 / 1) #15 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 02:31:11 PM EST
if you cook them then dry them, you end up with that kind of instant bean soup stuff.
--
The three things that make a diamond also make a waffle.
[ Parent ]
Yeah, I wouldn't dry beans or rice by debacle (4.00 / 1) #18 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 05:57:10 PM EST
But homemade noodles are different than store bought, generally. Thanks to Wegmans, we get our noodles fairly fresh, and any noodles we might make are cooked and eaten on the spot.

IF YOU HAVE TWO FIRLES THOROWNF MONEY ART SUOCIDE GIRLS STRIPPER HPW CAN YPUS :OSE?!?!?!?(elcevisides).

[ Parent ]
Cantaloupes? by webwench (2.00 / 0) #11 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 11:56:46 AM EST
Seriously?

I may try the rice and skip the noodles, since ramen and Japanese-style buckwheat noodles and such are so quick to cook anyway.

Getting more attention than you since 1998. Ya ya!

[ Parent ]
noodles by StackyMcRacky (4.00 / 1) #16 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 04:20:13 PM EST
just go with angel hair pasta - it cooks so quickly, no need to pre-do it.  also, couscous doesn't need pre-cooking either.

[ Parent ]
But angel hair is shit by debacle (2.00 / 0) #20 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 06:01:37 PM EST
It's like the uptight prudish blonde of the pasta world. There are so many things it doesn't work with, and it's so touchy - a minute overcooked and it's a brick of gluten.

IF YOU HAVE TWO FIRLES THOROWNF MONEY ART SUOCIDE GIRLS STRIPPER HPW CAN YPUS :OSE?!?!?!?(elcevisides).

[ Parent ]
you obviously don't backpack by StackyMcRacky (2.00 / 0) #23 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 08:21:02 PM EST


[ Parent ]
Obviously by debacle (1.00 / 4) #29 Tue Aug 05, 2008 at 05:27:09 AM EST
Because I don't agree with some tart on the internet.

IF YOU HAVE TWO FIRLES THOROWNF MONEY ART SUOCIDE GIRLS STRIPPER HPW CAN YPUS :OSE?!?!?!?(elcevisides).

[ Parent ]
Stacky is no tart by webwench (2.00 / 0) #31 Tue Aug 05, 2008 at 06:48:49 AM EST
She's sweet

Getting more attention than you since 1998. Ya ya!

[ Parent ]
You wouldn't think so by debacle (4.00 / 1) #19 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 05:58:37 PM EST
Because of the high moisture content, but if you cut it into 1/4 to 3/8 inch thick slabs, it dries into something akin to fruit leather, and it has a ton of flavor.

IF YOU HAVE TWO FIRLES THOROWNF MONEY ART SUOCIDE GIRLS STRIPPER HPW CAN YPUS :OSE?!?!?!?(elcevisides).

[ Parent ]
It's been years by blixco (4.00 / 1) #12 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 11:57:24 AM EST
since I did any backwoods camping. I used to pack in jerky and miso soups (those packets of soup) plus dried fruits.  When we were young, we'd do these ten day trips that required catching fish or starving.

I don't even know where the technology is today wrt freeze-dried food and whatnot.
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"You bring the weasel, I'll bring the whiskey." - kellnerin

Depends on what kind of camping. by vorheesleatherface (2.00 / 0) #14 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 01:33:22 PM EST
Camping within close proximity to your vehicle, or a days hike away from your vehicle? If you're limited to what you can comfortably carry, that changes the game.


Car camping style, by garlic (4.00 / 1) #21 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 06:06:24 PM EST
you can cook anything you can cook at home over a fire, with the right gear. Said gear may only require a dutch oven, although for combo dishes I like dutch oven and iron skillet.


[ Parent ]
Wok by ad hoc (4.00 / 1) #22 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 06:24:56 PM EST
A wok can cook absolutely anything.

--
The three things that make a diamond also make a waffle.
[ Parent ]
biscuits? by garlic (4.00 / 1) #24 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 09:03:47 PM EST
cake?


[ Parent ]
Possibly biscuits by ad hoc (2.00 / 0) #25 Tue Aug 05, 2008 at 02:18:14 AM EST
probably not cake. But it can do dumplings easily.

But I don't think there;s any good way to cook cake over a fire.
--
The three things that make a diamond also make a waffle.

[ Parent ]
a dutch oven can do it. by garlic (4.00 / 1) #26 Tue Aug 05, 2008 at 03:48:47 AM EST
My gf prefers to put the cake batter in a gutted orange peel instead though. Good for chocolate orange cup cakes.


[ Parent ]
Dutch oven by ad hoc (2.00 / 0) #33 Tue Aug 05, 2008 at 08:28:25 AM EST
a wok can do anything a dutch oven could so, so I guess you could make cake that way.
--
The three things that make a diamond also make a waffle.
[ Parent ]
Maybe Cupcakes! by Lady Jane (2.00 / 0) #37 Wed Aug 06, 2008 at 11:52:55 AM EST
I have a friend who cooks muffins by putting the batter in dixie cups and placing those in water  in a pot over the fire.  Super easy because you peal the cups away, toss them in the fire and eat the muffins.  I would think the same could be done for cake batter.

-----------------------------------------
"Buttons aren't toys" -- Trillian
[ Parent ]
motorcycle camping by webwench (4.00 / 1) #32 Tue Aug 05, 2008 at 06:50:08 AM EST
so weight isn't much of an issue, but volume and durability are, since everything goes into non-air-conditioned duffels.

Getting more attention than you since 1998. Ya ya!

[ Parent ]
well then by vorheesleatherface (4.00 / 1) #34 Tue Aug 05, 2008 at 01:05:51 PM EST
As far as durability goes, I say canned goods are the way to go. Also, rice. Also, Also, if you spend a good chunk of the day not driving, beans. Beans you have to soak for a few hours before using weigh less and take up less space. Bags of beans and rice can go a long way for two people. And there's a bazillion ways to flavor them. Would work well with your dehydrated stuff. Beans and rice kick teh ass.


[ Parent ]
beans by garlic (4.00 / 1) #35 Tue Aug 05, 2008 at 01:14:02 PM EST
double bagged in 2 ziplocks with water can soak while you are riding.


[ Parent ]
quite true [nt] by vorheesleatherface (2.00 / 0) #36 Tue Aug 05, 2008 at 01:22:47 PM EST



[ Parent ]
ramen = dehydrated noodles by clover kicker (4.00 / 2) #17 Mon Aug 04, 2008 at 05:19:58 PM EST
And I doubt anyone can improve on the perfection that is ramen.

Watch your salt levels by wiredog (4.00 / 1) #27 Tue Aug 05, 2008 at 04:35:45 AM EST
It's really easy to end up with too much salt when you're dehydrating.

Earth First!
(We can strip mine the rest later.)

Ask HuSi: Happy campers' road food? | 37 comments (37 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback