Print Story Straight Teeth Are So-o-o-o Bourgeoisie
Health
By CheeseburgerBrown (Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 07:20:45 AM EST) (all tags)
On Friday night I was sitting at the piano with my daughter when my son decided to attempt a flying leap from the couch onto my back. He missed. He dropped just short of me, his little hands clawing at my shoulders, and then caught the full impact of his fall with his upper jaw on the edge of the bench.

Blood? Oh yes. Plenty of that.

His left-side upper incisor was canted about forty-five degrees forward, and the tooth to the left of that was pushed about twenty degrees backward. This rearrangement left a gaping open wound behind the incisor, and it was this hole through which most of the blood was coming.

So, now he looks English.


He was braver than I was. By the time I managed to get the bleeding stopped he was calm and asking to watch a DVD whereas I was shaking like a leaf and dizzy. I didn't have his carseat so I called Littlestar out of work to come and give me a second opinion before going to camp out in the emergency room, but by that time the extent of the injury was plain and we knew that would be a waste of time. The teeth, despite their new angles, remained well-rooted and firm. The hole behind the incisor was not a gash, just the space opened up where the rear of the tooth had previously been seated.

Yam felt out the new configuration of his mouth with his tongue. "Toof stickine out," he reported. "I no like it."

He's getting used to it, though. I'm not. Every time I look at his precious little face I get a cold, windy feeling inside and want to sit down and be served a stiff drink. No ice.

He's going to visit our GP tomorrow to make sure there isn't any additional damage or a threat to his adult teeth, but it seems at this point we'll simply be advised to keep the wound clean until it heals over. For the time being we're rinsing it with salt water. Yam doesn't mind. He doesn't seem to be in any significant discomfort.

If you ask about his "funny tooth" he'll gladly explain. "I faw down, hitta bensh. Toof stickine out."

"Did it hurt?"

"Yeah."

"Does it hurt now?"

"No. Watsh Teletubby, pease?"

Kids bounce back fast. Me, less so. I still feel like crawling into a hole to quietly die. I hate it when my kids get broken. It's enough to want to keep them strapped down somewhere safe, with a sunlamp and some round-edged toys.

Gah.


< And now, this. | BBC White season: 'Rivers of Blood' >
Straight Teeth Are So-o-o-o Bourgeoisie | 23 comments (23 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
ouch by codemonkey uk (4.00 / 1) #1 Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 07:36:06 AM EST
but take heart, being english isn't all bad

--- Thad ---
Almost as Smart As you.
Maybe He'll Develop a Swank Transatlantic Accent! by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #8 Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 07:59:38 AM EST
You English don't have to live with the daily humiliation of sounding like Americans do on TV (but not, thankfully, as they do in real life).


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da.
[ Parent ]
As a new father I have to ask. by haplopeart (4.00 / 1) #2 Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 07:36:37 AM EST
Is there a point where you stop going in the room at night and putting your hand on their sleeping chest, "just to check"?

I had much the same kind of crash up when I was little, I seem to remember bouncing back pretty quick as well.  I remember hearing something along the lines of..."yep teeth are gonna be all screwed up till the permanents come in, not much we can do about it, even if we could it would be a waste of time and money since they are gonna fall out anyway.

Answer to question: by anonimouse (4.00 / 3) #3 Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 07:44:17 AM EST
Yes, when the second one arrives.

Girls come and go but a mortgage is for 25 years -- JtL
[ Parent ]
At about 1 yr for me. (nt) by ucblockhead (2.00 / 0) #4 Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 07:45:00 AM EST

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[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
[ Parent ]
Yes and No. by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #7 Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 07:56:12 AM EST
Is there a point where you stop going in the room at night and putting your hand on their sleeping chest, "just to check"?

As has been mentioned by others, if you don't get over it by the first year you'll definitely get over it by the second child. Personally I relaxed quite a bit once we were out of the statistically thick "crib death" zone of worry.

On the other hand, when my kids sleep in (a rare event) I become convinced that they're both dead and then I rocket out of bed and invariably wake them both up as I check for vital signs, thus screwing up the sleeping in benefits for everyone all at once.


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da.
[ Parent ]
The new terror by ucblockhead (4.00 / 4) #13 Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 08:39:36 AM EST
I've moved on to a different sort of terror:

"Ah...it's nice and quiet. My, it hasn't been this quiet in a while. Nice being able to get stuff done without chaos. ... Wait. Wait. OH SHIT! What's he up to!?!?"

Or there's the cold terror of hearing these words: "daddy, can I have a towel?"
---
[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman

[ Parent ]
My Nightmare Phrase: by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 2) #14 Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 09:13:31 AM EST
If the chronic worrying stops by johnny (4.00 / 1) #11 Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 08:13:19 AM EST
and I can go back to the panic-free life I knew before my children were born, I'll let you know.

Older Daughter, age 27
Son, age 24
Younger Daughter, age 20
Buy my books, dammit!

[ Parent ]
Too True! by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 2) #15 Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 09:14:29 AM EST
If the chronic worrying stops, relax: it means you are now dead.


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da.
[ Parent ]
i hear that by StackyMcRacky (4.00 / 1) #18 Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 10:51:25 AM EST
today, the dude didn't wake up at 4, 5, or 6 am.  when i woke up at 7:30, i just knew he was dead.  I ran into his room and checked the crib...still asleep, of course.

[ Parent ]
Teeth by ucblockhead (4.00 / 2) #5 Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 07:47:33 AM EST
When I was two, I fell down a flight of stairs and put a bottom tooth all the way through my lower lip.

I turned out ok. Except for the deep, seething hatred. But that wasn't the teeth.
---
[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman

yeah by MillMan (2.00 / 0) #9 Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 08:06:59 AM EST
Apparently I smacked my face on the floor when I was about 2 years old. As a consequence one of my front teeth had a light green color due to being dead.

When I'm imprisoned as an enemy combatant, will you blog about it?

[ Parent ]
here, too by bobdole (2.00 / 0) #20 Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 02:03:38 PM EST
but I was twelve and the scar is still visible... no stairs involved.
-- The revolution will not be televised.
[ Parent ]
As long as you keep washing him so he doesn't by BadDoggie (4.00 / 4) #6 Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 07:55:22 AM EST
look French.

I kid. I'm kidding. 'S what I do. Everyone knows how much I love all things French.

woof.

OMG WE'RE FUCKED! -- duxup ?

It's been a weekend for teeth by georgeha (2.00 / 0) #10 Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 08:09:03 AM EST
Saturday six year old lost her last baby incisor, this time I was actually with her, and not getting DVD's at the library while letting her wander the Y unattended.

Glad to hear yam's alright.


Teeth are nothing by anonimouse (2.00 / 0) #12 Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 08:33:14 AM EST
Miss Minimouse has one finger that, when examined closely looks a bit weird. That's because Mr Minimouse decided to shut a door when her fingers were on the door frame. One trip to hospital, tip of finger surgically reattached. About a week later, tip of finger detached again. Strangely, she seems to have regrown the missing joint, it just looks a little distorted.

Girls come and go but a mortgage is for 25 years -- JtL
New Joint? by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #16 Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 09:15:35 AM EST
Or a space lizard in disguise... by LinDze (4.00 / 3) #17 Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 09:56:09 AM EST
nt

-Lin Dze
Arbeit Macht Frei
[ Parent ]
Did I... by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #19 Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 01:21:25 PM EST
tell you about the time my son filleted his nutsack on a broken tree branch?

Yeah? He doesn't much like climbing trees anymore.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

Ouch by Phil the Canuck (2.00 / 0) #21 Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 02:19:03 PM EST
My son had a run-in with his dresser once, and it left him with a cut across the bridge of his nose and under his eye.  He has small scars at both spots, and I still cringe sometimes thinking about it.

I fell down and broke my crown by ad hoc (4.00 / 1) #22 Mon Jan 28, 2008 at 03:08:55 PM EST
I think I was about 10. Dove backwards into he pool and hit the edge. Blood everywhere. Every new barber comments on it.
--
The three things that make a diamond also make a waffle.
I had a Bike accident like that by haplopeart (4.00 / 1) #23 Tue Jan 29, 2008 at 08:56:05 AM EST
Lucky I am not a quadriplegic.  Jumped my bike of a rather large mound of dirt, flipped the bike when the front wheel landed in an irrigation ditch came down directly on top of my head, I heard the "crunch" (take a hand full of straw, and twist while bending, thats the noise) as I hit compressing my spine.  Various doctors have said that one cost me 1 or 2 inches in height.

[ Parent ]
Straight Teeth Are So-o-o-o Bourgeoisie | 23 comments (23 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback