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Diary
By blixco (Fri Sep 07, 2007 at 09:48:11 AM EST) (all tags)
Is it time?  It's time.  I'm tenuously in 3rd.


If you've read anything I wrote between 1999 and 2004, you'd quickly recognize some of the key phrases (and ideas) in my entry, bleakly called "Lines on a Map."  For someone who romanticises the road trip as much as I do, the story seemed fitting.

But it felt like I was imitating myself.

I've used the phrase "your heart breaks, tectonic" before.  I can't recall where, but it's one of those phrases that I use.  Because there are small heartbreaks.  Then there are those that change the landscape.

The point-of-view and tense were both exceedingly difficult for me to write in, but I wanted to depersonalize this, make it more universal.  If you grew up in a southwest town, this is what you felt.  You.  Me, included.

Let's see....I liked the beginning from my 2003 NaNoWriMo entry, so I used the same imagery, zooming in on the subject from the sky.  And I always felt pinned to the ground by the beauty of the sky in New Mexico.  You can't understand it unless you've been there, but it is constantly beautiful, and after a while you don't just get numb to it, you actually start to feel lorded by it.  I remember walking around the newer parts of the subdivision at night, headphones on, full moon rising over the Organ mountains and all I could think was: I can't open my eyes wide enough, I can't remember this well enough, and I certainly don't deserve this beauty.

You live in a small town, you love to hate it.  You want noting more than to leave.  Las Cruces wasn't that small, but my neighborhood was 10 miles out, isolated, and it felt tiny.  200 miles of desert north of me, and it felt small.

And yeah, Laurea and I were driving out of the state and all I could think was: this is it.

Why doesn't it feel bigger?

Why aren't the hills on fire?  Why isn't the sky falling?  Where's the parade?

And there in Tucumcari, we were delayed by the annual summer pagent, rodeo and fair parade.

We watched the floats, had breakfast, and headed east, across the wasteland of the Texas panhandle, losing forever our tie to the land at home.

< The Road To The Road Home | BBC White season: 'Rivers of Blood' >
WFC post mortem. | 7 comments (7 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
Also, by blixco (2.00 / 0) #1 Fri Sep 07, 2007 at 09:57:11 AM EST
the cover I uploaded is a black and white picture of the old version of the road I wrote about.  It's highway 85 northbound, well north of where I lived, since replaced by I-25.
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"You bring the weasel, I'll bring the whiskey." - kellnerin
Well, I liked it. by ana (4.00 / 1) #2 Fri Sep 07, 2007 at 10:23:46 AM EST
The sense of place, on those long straight desert highways. Our two stories were not placed all that far apart, really. And I did love the sense that this momentous event in the life of the protagonist is not noticed by the road at all, except for an ephemeral cloud of dust.

Power up your flaming yo-yos already! --StackyMcRacky

Creepy name. by muchagecko (4.00 / 1) #3 Fri Sep 07, 2007 at 11:50:29 AM EST
Organ Mountains. Creepy.

"It means more if you have to earn it, even if it's by doing something as simple as eating a meal." Kellnerin
Pipe Organ. by blixco (4.00 / 1) #4 Fri Sep 07, 2007 at 12:05:20 PM EST
Now, like, body parts.
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"You bring the weasel, I'll bring the whiskey." - kellnerin
[ Parent ]
And by "now" I mean, NOT. by blixco (4.00 / 1) #5 Fri Sep 07, 2007 at 12:05:53 PM EST
Goddamn.
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"You bring the weasel, I'll bring the whiskey." - kellnerin
[ Parent ]
You've taken the creepy out of them. by muchagecko (4.00 / 1) #6 Fri Sep 07, 2007 at 12:17:59 PM EST
Pipe organs are just fun.

"It means more if you have to earn it, even if it's by doing something as simple as eating a meal." Kellnerin
[ Parent ]
tectonic is just a great word by Kellnerin (4.00 / 1) #7 Fri Sep 07, 2007 at 04:05:38 PM EST
and underused.

There were bits of this story, flashes that were like tiny revelations. Aiming for the universal, though, trying to pin down that "you" is a tough balancing act. It was interesting, as ana noted, how each story carried its own geography, with the contours of the land that each author knew best, and with yours, well, your geography gave you away. Nicely done.

--
"Late to the party" is the new "ahead of the curve" -- CRwM

WFC post mortem. | 7 comments (7 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback