Print Story Mundane telepathy again.
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By dmg (Mon Nov 05, 2007 at 05:14:03 PM EST) (all tags)
You may recall my earlier 'telepathy scare' which had me questioning my sanity. Well it has happened again.


So I'm on the tube again on the way home from work, quite late. I'm sitting diagonally across from this girl listening to my iPod (Lustra, but that's not important).

So I've switched off to the world, and all of a sudden I get this thought in my head that I could tell was not mine. As before it was totally mundane. It was sort of an "I'm going to get something from my bag" thought. And literally about a second after I had that wierd thought the girl sitting across from me goes into her bag and pulls out a book.

Im not so freaked out about it as I was the first time, it seems relatively harmless. Odd that it only seems to happen on the train home from work. I wonder if it has something to do with induced currents in my brain from the rail tracks or possibly I'm in some wierd trance like state on the commute?

I'm starting to feel like I should try and see if I can do it conciously rather than by accident - anyone got any book recommendations?

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Mundane telepathy again. | 29 comments (29 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
Currents. by ni (4.00 / 1) #1 Mon Nov 05, 2007 at 06:06:32 PM EST
I (occasionally) do hardware design for a living. It's definitely the currents.


"What woman wouldn't love a guy in WW2 aviator glasses eating their ass?" -- dest
Currants. by gazbo (2.00 / 0) #16 Tue Nov 06, 2007 at 11:11:18 AM EST
I (occasionally) do baking for a living.  It's definitely the currants.

I recommend always assuming 7th normal form where items in a text column are not allowed to rhyme.

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really? by Merekat (2.00 / 0) #18 Tue Nov 06, 2007 at 12:13:04 PM EST
I don't think that is a credible raisin.

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A have a chirurgeon's manual by chuckles (4.00 / 1) #2 Mon Nov 05, 2007 at 08:28:03 PM EST
It states that the symptoms are caused by ill humors inside the skull, and can be relieved by undergoing trepanation. I am willing to perform this procedure on you for free.

"The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin [...] would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities"
'A have' -> 'I have' by chuckles (4.00 / 1) #3 Mon Nov 05, 2007 at 08:28:29 PM EST


"The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin [...] would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities"
[ Parent ]
Proof that the device has been tested by MohammedNiyalSayeed (4.00 / 3) #5 Mon Nov 05, 2007 at 10:12:33 PM EST

How noble and scientific of you to have taken one for the team!


-
You can build the most elegant fountain in the world, but eventually a winged rat will be using it as a drinking bowl.
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You make it sound like a bad thing by chuckles (4.00 / 2) #8 Mon Nov 05, 2007 at 11:29:21 PM EST
You need to set yourself free!

"The one absolutely certain way of bringing this nation to ruin [...] would be to permit it to become a tangle of squabbling nationalities"
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I'm quite capable by dmg (2.00 / 0) #11 Tue Nov 06, 2007 at 12:57:07 AM EST
Of performing that procedure myself, but thanks for the kind offer.
--
dmg - HuSi's most dimwitted overprivileged user.
[ Parent ]
Why was she listening to your iPod? by Horatio Hellpop (4.00 / 1) #4 Mon Nov 05, 2007 at 09:09:52 PM EST

"You can't really know something until you ruin it for everyone." -some guy who used to have an account here

duh by Merekat (4.00 / 2) #6 Mon Nov 05, 2007 at 11:25:09 PM EST
It isn't telepathy.

It is clearly mind control. You bend others to your will without realising and then think you are predicting, rather than causing their actions.

Cold reading and an active imagination n/t by gpig (4.00 / 2) #7 Mon Nov 05, 2007 at 11:28:23 PM EST

---
(,   ,') -- eep
IAWTP by ambrosen (4.00 / 2) #9 Mon Nov 05, 2007 at 11:52:39 PM EST
But I'd call it as being a function of being half asleep on the train, and not writing his internal mental narrative until the event's actually happened. Kind of like what happens with dreaming.

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Not only when dreaming by Dr Thrustgood (4.00 / 3) #10 Tue Nov 06, 2007 at 12:44:33 AM EST
But also the same phenomenon occurs in bad accidents  when "time slows down," it's apparently your brain playing things back in slow motion after the event's actually occurred.

Ever have that thing when you look at a watch or clock, and one second seems to last forever, and then it ticks on normally? Same thing innit.



[ Parent ]
Yeah. by ambrosen (4.00 / 1) #22 Wed Nov 07, 2007 at 03:00:35 AM EST
It's one of the things that I'd like everyone to have hammered into their head as frequently and as often as possible: "The way you think you're thinking isn't actually the way you are thinking".

[ Parent ]
cosmic wind currents by johnny (2.00 / 0) #12 Tue Nov 06, 2007 at 04:11:38 AM EST
there might be a place where local causality is disrupted, in a local-magnetic-field kind of way.

I went through a period of a few years where telepathic and pre-cog and similar stuff seemed to happen a lot.  Then it stopped.

Although I also like the mind-control theory. Perhaps it's some kind of combination of the two.

Avoid auto-trepanation, however.  Makes all one's hats fit funny thereafter.
... this is dreamworld after all... it isn't? Shit.

Just out of curiousity . . . by Christopher Robin was Murdered (2.00 / 0) #13 Tue Nov 06, 2007 at 05:19:53 AM EST
How can you tell when a thought isn't yours?

Is it like getting song lyrics stuck in your head?

Does it sound like you hear somebody saying something?

for me by rizzo (2.00 / 0) #14 Tue Nov 06, 2007 at 06:45:51 AM EST
it usually occurs like I'm hearing someone speak over the telephone in my head, in other words, it "sounds" compressed. It feels foreign in an indescribable way of knowing for which the English word "know" is woefully inadequate to describe.

It most often happens for me right before going to sleep or just as I'm waking up. Though a friend of mine was, for a time until her life was traumatized, able to hear me perfectly all the time as though I were speaking if I projected a thought or sentence at her. I couldn't hear her at all, so she would speak her responses. We'd go back and forth carrying on this whole conversation where I was just staring at her and she'd say stuff to me between pauses which were perfectly context-appropriate responses. It really freaked out our other friends, especially since we were talking about them. That came in very handy a few times when we had to decide to delicately throw somebody out of her house.
--

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So it's a language-based phenomenon. by Christopher Robin was Murdered (2.00 / 0) #15 Tue Nov 06, 2007 at 06:54:51 AM EST
You projected linguistic, if non-verbal, communications.

Or is that just metaphor because you're now trying to explain it to me?

Could you receive and send more general sensations?

In dmg's case above, would have heard another voice actually say "I need to check my purse" or would have just been aware of a not-you need to check "your" purse?

[ Parent ]
Its very hard to put into words. by dmg (2.00 / 0) #17 Tue Nov 06, 2007 at 11:27:29 AM EST
But the thought is as if I was having the thought, but I know it isn't my thought, because I know I don't have a bag.

The thought itself is sort of out of context.
--
dmg - HuSi's most dimwitted overprivileged user.

[ Parent ]
So you felt . . . by Christopher Robin was Murdered (2.00 / 0) #19 Tue Nov 06, 2007 at 12:53:52 PM EST
Like you had to look into your bag, and it was the fact that you didn't have a bag that tipped you off.

I wonder how many times you haven't had contextual clues and just assumed the thought was yours. Like picking up somebody else's hunger. Without an external clue, how would you know it isn't yours.

Or do you think you'd always know?

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Well by dmg (2.00 / 0) #21 Tue Nov 06, 2007 at 01:46:53 PM EST
As I said I was listening to my iPod, oblivious to everything, and then this random thought "I must look in my bag" comes into my head. Its really hard to explain it, it just feels external thats the only word for it.
--
dmg - HuSi's most dimwitted overprivileged user.
[ Parent ]
in my case by rizzo (4.00 / 1) #29 Mon Nov 19, 2007 at 04:59:56 PM EST
it was linguistic, non-verbal, half-duplex, verified-verbatim telepathy. It's been a long time since I had a good receiver like her to practice with... kinda miss it!
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[ Parent ]
cynical clinical explanation by fluffy (4.00 / 1) #20 Tue Nov 06, 2007 at 01:28:06 PM EST
You were half-asleep.  She reached into her bag.  Your brain put this random fact into the random-fact collection pile.  After it did that, random connections led you to think that several seconds before that you thought, "I'll grab something from my bag."

When you're at the edge of wakefulness, perceptions get mucked up, especially temporal ones.  It's easy to believe that you woke up right before the phone rang, a lot harder to believe that you were awake for an hour before that but just didn't remember it because your hippocampus was shut off by your reticular activating system.
busy bees buzz | sockpuppet revolution

is that really 'awake' then? by garlic (2.00 / 0) #23 Wed Nov 07, 2007 at 10:42:47 AM EST


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Consciousness is a multi-axis continuum (nt) by fluffy (2.00 / 0) #24 Wed Nov 07, 2007 at 01:25:10 PM EST
what are the end points of the axis called? by garlic (2.00 / 0) #25 Wed Nov 07, 2007 at 01:38:23 PM EST
how many axis?


[ Parent ]
My point is there are multiple axes by fluffy (4.00 / 1) #26 Thu Nov 08, 2007 at 09:58:53 AM EST
One of them, which is the one you were initially debating, was whether the hippocampus is turned on or off.  That axis would be "remembers what happened."  The end points are "does remember" and "doesn't remember," with various shades of "sorta remembers" in between.

Another axis is "dream state," i.e. whether the random background crap in the brain is being proceessed by the consciousness.

Another axis is "sleep paralysis" (or more generally, "cataplexy") i.e. whether the body can move or not.

In traditional restful sleep, hippocampus is off, dream state is on, sleep paralysis is on.  In traditional wakefulness, it's the opposite.  But just those three axes alone give 18 perfectly-conceivable combinations, many of which perfectly explain what dmg experienced.
busy bees buzz | sockpuppet revolution

[ Parent ]
thanks by garlic (4.00 / 1) #27 Thu Nov 08, 2007 at 11:04:08 AM EST
I wasn't debating you, I don't know anything about it and wanted to hear more.


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are dreams "random background crap"? by dmg (2.00 / 0) #28 Thu Nov 08, 2007 at 02:52:24 PM EST
Jung would argue not...
--
dmg - HuSi's most dimwitted overprivileged user.
[ Parent ]
Mundane telepathy again. | 29 comments (29 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback