Print Story a question for the Brits
Food
By clover kicker (Wed Jun 07, 2006 at 03:50:22 PM EST) (all tags)
I recently watched a British documentary on TV. They occasionally added subtitles so dumb Canucks could understand the more outraaaaageous accents.

Would a similar film from heavily accented parts of North America (Deep South, Boston, Newfoundland) get subtitles in the UK?

Also, I had no idea people still used "bairns" in everyday conversation.



I enjoyed the film, was impressed with celebrity chef dude's palpable rage about the problems, and perseverance while tilting at windmills. Did this documentary shame the government into taking action?
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a question for the Brits | 13 comments (13 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
Answers by gpig (2.00 / 0) #1 Wed Jun 07, 2006 at 03:59:54 PM EST
Would a similar film from heavily accented parts of North America (Deep South, Boston, Newfoundland) get subtitles in the UK?

Not that I've seen.

I enjoyed the film, was impressed with celebrity chef dude's palpable rage about the problems, and perseverance while tilting at windmills. Did this documentary shame the government into taking action?

It did, thus proving he wasn't really tilting at windmills. He was probably aided by the fact that a lot of the schools involved got better exam results (presumably via better nutrition and energy levels for the kids). Also, compared to invading Mesopotamia or building nuclear power stations, the sums of money involved are trivial.
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(,   ,') -- eep

cool by clover kicker (2.00 / 0) #2 Wed Jun 07, 2006 at 05:04:16 PM EST
> It did, thus proving he wasn't really tilting at
> windmills

Glad to see the good guys win something for a change.

> the sums of money involved are trivial

I thought that was one of the most interesting things - how he could prepare those dishes within 5 pence of chicken nuggets + [chips|fries].

I hope he convinced someone to pay the lunch ladies for their extra time.

[ Parent ]
Are you sure you haven't been reading up on this? by gpig (2.00 / 0) #6 Wed Jun 07, 2006 at 11:37:28 PM EST
I hope he convinced someone to pay the lunch ladies for their extra time.

This was, in fact, the only problem with the whole scheme -- dinner ladies have been complaining that they have to do a lot more without getting any extra pay.
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(,   ,') -- eep

[ Parent ]
heh by clover kicker (2.00 / 0) #8 Thu Jun 08, 2006 at 01:23:03 AM EST
Watching the video it struck me as unfair that these poor girls had to come in early for free. All of a sudden they're responsible for a bunch of extra stuff, but are getting guilted into free work because it's so much better for the kids.

[ Parent ]
That, and he BLAGGED THE INGREDIENTS by Rogerborg (2.00 / 0) #13 Thu Jun 08, 2006 at 01:43:57 AM EST
Don't let that stop you writing to the Daily Mail and insisting that we switch to organic Immigrant Mince or whatever he recommended.

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Metus amatores matrum compescit, non clementia.
[ Parent ]
Bairns by Vulch (2.00 / 0) #3 Wed Jun 07, 2006 at 09:53:00 PM EST

People have been using the word since the Vikings turned up, if not longer. Why stop now?

Subtitle answer by Cloaked User (2.00 / 0) #4 Wed Jun 07, 2006 at 10:05:42 PM EST
Not that I've ever seen, although I don't watch a huge amount of TV so perhaps, if the accent is sufficiently thick.

In fact, come to think of it the only time I remember seeing anything subtitled (other than for the hard of hearing) in an English TV program (as opposed to an imported one) was when it was hard to make out - eg a recording of a phone call, or one made with a hidden microphone, etc.


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This is not a psychotic episode. It is a cleansing moment of clarity.

Were you also impressed by gazbo (4.00 / 3) #5 Wed Jun 07, 2006 at 11:11:26 PM EST
With his fat-tongued cuntiness?

RE: subtitles.  I genuinely think that the reason we don't do it is out of stereotypical English manners.  Like it would seem churlish and unsporting to imply that the person in question is not speaking perfectly clearly.

They rarely even subtitle foreigners who clearly have great difficulty with English.  If Johnny Foreigner has gone to the awful trouble of speaking English, it simply wouldn't do to suggest he was doing a bad job.


I recommend always assuming 7th normal form where items in a text column are not allowed to rhyme.

Ahem by Breaker (4.00 / 3) #7 Wed Jun 07, 2006 at 11:53:18 PM EST
I think you'll find that's fat tongued Mockney cunt.


[ Parent ]
aha by clover kicker (4.00 / 1) #11 Thu Jun 08, 2006 at 01:30:36 AM EST
On this side of the pond, it simply wouldn't do to cater to anything other than the absolute lowest common denominator. It might take a bit of work to understand those accents, can't have that!

[ Parent ]
Yes, he totally shamed them by Rogerborg (2.00 / 0) #9 Thu Jun 08, 2006 at 01:23:07 AM EST
Into announcing a policy review.  I think there was even a committee. A committee!.

The problem was, you see, that Fat Tongue arrived at his cost figures by hitting up his Mockney Mates for cheesey quavers.  The prices that he was able to obtain are not available on a daily basis to regular humans.

I can barely understand the Mockney Cunt, so I can see why they flubfytled him.  I did hear tell that a Jockish cultural export was subtitled when smuggled into Engerland.

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Metus amatores matrum compescit, non clementia.

they didn't subtitle him at all by clover kicker (4.00 / 1) #10 Thu Jun 08, 2006 at 01:28:55 AM EST
They occasionally subtitled the lunch ladies and parents.

While I'm talking about incomprehensible English, what is the etymology of "Jockland", "Jockish"?

[ Parent ]
It's because we're so Jockular by Rogerborg (4.00 / 1) #12 Thu Jun 08, 2006 at 01:42:17 AM EST
Ho ho ho, motherfucker.

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Metus amatores matrum compescit, non clementia.
[ Parent ]
a question for the Brits | 13 comments (13 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback