Print Story WFC2: Damn Write – 17 stories enter; one story leaves!
Diary
By Christopher Robin was Murdered (Mon Jun 12, 2006 at 12:14:37 PM EST) (all tags)
A contest of champions . . . competitors from around the globe . . . a struggle for supremacy. For the winner, fame and respect; they shall be adored by the millions and their cup overflow with the milk of joy and life. For the losers, ignominy and disgrace; they shall sup on not but the bitter ashes of regret and humiliation.

Never mind the World's Cup – here's the WFC2!

Update by ana & hulver - now, with author names, and results!



At 5:00, Manhattan Mean Time, the first phase of what it indubitably the greatest undertaking ever undertaken in the modern era – WFC2: Damn Write! – came to a close.

Many were called and, when the dust finally settled, the following stories stood upon the WFC landscape like towering monuments to literary genius.

Ladies and germs, I present to that colossal cache of captivating chronicles, that powerful and perplexing pile of prose, that superb stockpile of stories we call: The Entries.

MissTrish Walking
cam A Cat Named Neutron
fleece The Eighth Wonder
CRwM The Idea Double-Sized Annual Spectacular
The Fool And You Never Ask Directions, Either
zarathus Come Again
hulver The Wedding Guest
hulver Death of the Worlds
Merekat It's Not Somebody Who's Seen the Light
Driusan The Colony
aphrael Voices
ana Europa, Signing Off
toxicfur Salient Point
Skrymarch Reception
Kellnerin The Color of Rain
monkey flipper To Be Established
[deleted] Happy Anniversary

Now, boys and girls, one of these seventeen stories is a true masterpiece. It represents the unfettered potential of human genius and craft when alloyed with keen insight and imagination. But how do we know which on is it? We vote! Using the poll in this diary entry vote for the stories you liked best. This is democracy, this is mob rule! This is the way literary merit should be always be decided: by cage match! VOTE NOW!

What? You say you've voted for your favorite tales of the end times and you've still got a throbbing, burning, yearning to vote some more. Well, true believers, as a limited, one-time offer, just for you ('cause I like you face), you can now vote on cover treatments as well! Yes, hot damn.

Here are the cover treatments in all their glory. I do need to warn the faint, the overweight, and people with pre-existing heart conditions: these cover treatments are so powerful, each and every one a gleaming fragment of the Sublime, that CRwM will not be held responsible for any injury or death that may result in viewing them. You or your next of kin can take that up with theantix.

Without further ado, the cover creators and their works:

driusan
persimmon
yicky yacky

Just how badass are these covers? Their own mommas are afraid of them, that's how bad they are. And they freakin' triple dog dare you to vote for your favorite cover in the poll. Go on. Do it. What are you, scared? Is that what they taught you in that fancy school of yours?

Because we can't stop you, you can vote for as many or as few titles as you want – but only a complete and total blowhole would abuse that system and whatever happens to said blowhole, especially if it involves using a large metal pole to bifurcate their left foot, is well-deserved, but in no way condoned by the management of WFC2: Damn Write!

Voting closed on the June 19th, 2006.


Results

The Results

< "(Subway) Train Yard, Etc." | BBC White season: 'Rivers of Blood' >
WFC2: Damn Write – 17 stories enter; one story leaves! | 55 comments (55 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
Attn Persimmon Individual: by greyrat (2.00 / 0) #1 Mon Jun 12, 2006 at 12:20:19 PM EST
What's with the ankh as a symbol of the apocolypse? I mean if you're talking holy war, I think the Catholic Christian Crusaders did it best.

it's not by persimmon (4.00 / 1) #18 Mon Jun 12, 2006 at 08:05:53 PM EST
it's the life that remains after the destruction.

HTH.
-----
"Nature is such a fucking plagarist."

[ Parent ]
WIPO: by Driusan (2.00 / 0) #2 Mon Jun 12, 2006 at 12:22:08 PM EST
1. ()

I thought it was very zen. Western pseudo-zen, that is.

--
Vive le Montréal libre.

I ignored that one. by Christopher Robin was Murdered (4.00 / 1) #5 Mon Jun 12, 2006 at 12:31:08 PM EST
You can't have a competition if one of the works is so clearly superior. In the name of fair play, it had to be eliminated.

[ Parent ]
In that case by Driusan (2.00 / 0) #6 Mon Jun 12, 2006 at 12:43:19 PM EST
I can appreciate your reasoning. So now that there's no reason to argue about that, hurry up and go vote for my entry.

--
Vive le Montréal libre.
[ Parent ]
oops by ana (2.00 / 0) #3 Mon Jun 12, 2006 at 12:22:21 PM EST
in the process of making the poll front-page, i seem to have detached it from the story. Will try to fix; meanwhile please to vote on the diary page or the front page.

Can you introspect out loud? --CRwM

Rawk! You should sell used cars. +1FP [nt] by yicky yacky (2.00 / 0) #4 Mon Jun 12, 2006 at 12:27:13 PM EST

----
Vacuity abhors a vacuum.
IAWTP by Kellnerin (2.00 / 0) #8 Mon Jun 12, 2006 at 01:56:38 PM EST
Where is the poll option for this story? The force of these words was so great I feared civilizations would fall. Even the cockroaches trembled, for they foresaw their coming destruction.

All of the cover designs kick ass. I can't wait to read the rest of the entries.

--
"later" meant either "when you walk around the corner" or "oatmeal."

[ Parent ]
i, um... by ana (2.00 / 0) #10 Mon Jun 12, 2006 at 03:03:39 PM EST
...sorta broke it.

Can you introspect out loud? --CRwM

[ Parent ]
I meant, by Kellnerin (2.00 / 0) #21 Tue Jun 13, 2006 at 01:42:54 AM EST
the option, within the now-FP poll, to vote for this story.

--
"later" meant either "when you walk around the corner" or "oatmeal."
[ Parent ]
Time's up already? by ambrosen (4.00 / 1) #7 Mon Jun 12, 2006 at 01:31:23 PM EST
Not having a hard drive's really buggered up my leisure time use. Ah, well. Next time, even though I had an excellent concept.

The deadline. by Christopher Robin was Murdered (2.00 / 0) #23 Tue Jun 13, 2006 at 04:14:06 AM EST
Yeah, theantix and I thought we could add a little spice to the whole thing by putting more time pressure on the various writers. Perhaps we cut it too short. Something for the upcoming champeen to think about.

[ Parent ]
Well, by ambrosen (2.00 / 0) #24 Tue Jun 13, 2006 at 04:17:54 AM EST
I don't have the best track record of entering xFCs, so I don't see why this would be any different.

[ Parent ]
So by Merekat (2.00 / 0) #30 Tue Jun 13, 2006 at 07:49:43 AM EST
do you think the shorter deadline had an impact on quality or just quantity?

[ Parent ]
It doesn't seem to have affected either (nt) by Driusan (2.00 / 0) #31 Tue Jun 13, 2006 at 08:19:10 AM EST


--
Vive le Montréal libre.
[ Parent ]
Purely anecdotally . . . by Christopher Robin was Murdered (2.00 / 0) #32 Tue Jun 13, 2006 at 08:30:48 AM EST
I know of at least three users who have said they were working on something but just didn't have the time to finish. If that's true, we would have had at least three more entries. And the more the merrier, I say.

Personally, all I think this particular deadline did was screw folks who suddenly found themselves a little busier than normal.

In retrospect, planning this deadline, we should have made it roomy enough to not cut off anybody (three weeks) or made it so tight that it put everybody under pressure (two days).

[ Parent ]
I liked the shorter deadline by Driusan (2.00 / 0) #33 Tue Jun 13, 2006 at 08:37:50 AM EST
As someone who has to read them all to judge them, I happen to think that there's already too many entries. Another 3 is another 6000 words to read. Plus, I'm impatient, the closer to instant gratification we can get for knowing who wrote what, how many votes they got, etc, the better.

--
Vive le Montréal libre.
[ Parent ]
I had several story ideas by persimmon (2.00 / 0) #34 Tue Jun 13, 2006 at 11:30:42 AM EST
and my original plan was to enter several of them.

However, the period immediately preceding the deadline coincided with

  • finals week
  • starting my new job
  • moving, and
  • a minor but nasty injury.

So I'd tend to agree with you, on the screwing over people who otherwise would have participated.
-----
"Nature is such a fucking plagarist."
[ Parent ]
attention WFC1 infidels by Kellnerin (2.00 / 0) #9 Mon Jun 12, 2006 at 02:17:06 PM EST
I hope CRwM and theantix don't mind my tacking on my query to this story, but last time around there was some talk of making a real-life book of this stuff (seeing as WFC1 was pitched as a hypothetical anthology). I was gonna play with creating such a thing, but it occurs to me that some of the participants might not like their work to be included since it wasn't part of the deal up front. So would anyone who submitted to WFC1 mind dropping me a PM to let me know if it's OK to use your work? If you wrote a post-mortem, please let me know if you'd like that to be included as well (in a separate section from the stories, I'm thinking).

Of course, I would like to include everyone if at all possible, but I think opt-out is evil, so I'll assume if I don't hear from you that it's not OK.

At the very least this will be available as a free PDF, or I'll look into actual printing. I don't expect this'll be a money-making operation either way.

Note WFC2 is not included in the query at this time since I don't want to know who-all wrote the entries, yet :)

--
"later" meant either "when you walk around the corner" or "oatmeal."

Oh, I nearly forgot by Driusan (2.00 / 0) #11 Mon Jun 12, 2006 at 03:08:25 PM EST
Minireviews I wrote while trying to decide who to vote for last night. Last minute entries don't get reviewed (though I read them):


()

Zen

Walking

Is there a reason this is in HTML? I refuse to review it in protest.

A Cat Named Neutron

Um. Okay mns.

The Eighth Wonder

I suspect you've either been reading or writing a lot of 256's diaries lately. You're lucky I dig them. Gets one of my votes, despite the dubious usage of html.

The Idea

Bonus points for trying something different. Minus points for it not really fitting the medium. The fact that some of the narration in some of the panels is either unillustratable ("She worries that she's no longer the youngest woman at the Herald."), or you'd need a damn good artist to do ("Her legs are still shapely, but she isn't young any more and the entire posture, while still being physically arousing, immediately reminds the reader that she's too old to pretend to this naïve sensuality.")  is distracting at times. Bonus points just barely outweigh the minus points, and it gets my vote.

And You Never Ask Directions, Either

I don't get it.

Come Again

You're not Joyce. You're not Palahniuk. Use quotation marks.

The Wedding Guest

I think I missed an allusion in the title. And the angst at the end is a little opaque. Unless maybe that sentence near the end is supposed to read: Ironically the one place they say you're safe is out on the sea? Nonetheless, I like. Gets my vote.

Death of the Worlds

Zomg! An actual reason to use HTML for something that can't be done in plain text! I liked the original style (Unless you consider Bram Stoker prior art.) But the motivation for removing the single-cell organisms isn't really clear. Were they trying to wipe out humanity? Then why are they surprised at the effects? Were they trying to use humanity for something else? Then why did they invade in the first place?

It's Not Somebody Who's Seen The Light

I like it. I voted for it. There's something constructive I meant to complain about when I first read it, but I can't remember what, skimming it now.

The Colony

I can't help but feel there's something wrong with the science in this, though I'm not entirely sure what. But I can mostly write it off as the narrator not understanding it since it's in the first person. I like the twist.

Voices

Not a fan of the religious overtones, though without them it'd just be story number 1. Well written enough to get a vote from me despite that and the dubious usage of html (and worse, MS Word).

Salient Point

Like the title. The story's a little long for one where absolutely nothing really happens until the last couple paragraphs.

Europa, Signing Off

Surely they have local proxies to reduce latency?

My predictions:

Voices, It's Not Somebody Who's Seen the Light, and Eighth Wonder for win, place and show, though I'd prefer the first two swapped. The Wedding Guest gets 4th.

Cover art: I liked persimmons. I voted for it.

--
Vive le Montréal libre.

why is html usage dubious? by aphrael (2.00 / 0) #12 Mon Jun 12, 2006 at 03:20:07 PM EST
I'm reading in firefox, and things that aren't in html i have to copy and save and then open in an editor because they pop up in windows with no word wrap. :(
If television is a babysitter, the internet is a drunk librarian who won't shut up.
[ Parent ]
HTML just strikes me.. by Driusan (2.00 / 0) #13 Mon Jun 12, 2006 at 03:32:24 PM EST
..as trying to cover up lack of writing by prettying it up. If there's a good reason to use it, I have nothing against it. If a story doesn't need it though, I prefer to see people try and let their stories stand on the merit of their writing.

--
Vive le Montréal libre.
[ Parent ]
I agree with aphrael. by toxicfur (2.00 / 0) #14 Mon Jun 12, 2006 at 04:00:31 PM EST
Readability is important to me, and html is easier to read than plain text. Plus, it allows me to do things like italics.
--
Continue to lean until you feel gravity threatening to discipline you for being stupid. - CRwM
[ Parent ]
Get a real web browser. by Driusan (2.00 / 0) #15 Mon Jun 12, 2006 at 04:12:42 PM EST
Line wrapping isn't exactly a ground breaking feature.

I'll grant that italics and bold are nice, though.

--
Vive le Montréal libre.

[ Parent ]
which one are you recommending? by aphrael (2.00 / 0) #16 Mon Jun 12, 2006 at 04:15:38 PM EST
explorer, which doesn't block popups? opera, which sucks resources like a vacuum?

us windows folks have limited options.
If television is a babysitter, the internet is a drunk librarian who won't shut up.

[ Parent ]
Uh, I don't have a problem with line breaks. by toxicfur (2.00 / 0) #17 Mon Jun 12, 2006 at 04:19:47 PM EST
I just like a font other than courier, which I find harder to read. And line breaks that make a bit more sense - instead of a column, it actually fills the screen.
--
Continue to lean until you feel gravity threatening to discipline you for being stupid. - CRwM
[ Parent ]
If the mime type is by yicky yacky (4.00 / 1) #19 Tue Jun 13, 2006 at 12:28:02 AM EST

text/plain, most browsers don't, nor should they, wrap text. Inserting breaks for ease-of-reading purposes is the job of a text editor. The easiest way to read these docs in the mozilla/firefox variants is just to 'view source' and use the soft text wrapping option there.

I both agree and disagree over HTML. There are some stories (both here and in the last WFC) which use HTML appallingly (actually, they use CSS appallingly, but the point stands); in one case, the author assumed they knew how everyone else was browsing, and had used absolute pixel coordinates which, in my case, either dumped one block of text on top of another or placed the second block miles down the page, depending on the font size.

Thankfully, those stories are in the minority, and are almost certainly the result of a "Save as HTML" operation in some WYSIWYG editor and not the direct fault of the author.

If you use non-wrapped text, it is a (tiny, miniscule) pain to open the story in something else. It then becomes the task of an author to block-wrap their own work, if they feel any consideration for their readers. If you do this manually, it's a fucking chore. If you want to change something later on, it can become a PITA, whether done manually, or by editor, or by script. Not everyone knows how to do it, though.

As toxicfur points out, HTML allows you to use italics, bold, easily-adjustable indentation, alignment etc. While there is scope for an argument as to whether this is necessary, or is just pretty printing, they are features available to most "pure text" authors today and it seems fair to allow people to use them. Jesus: I'm far happier that people have used HTML to get these features as opposed to using PDFs or, worse, fucking Word docs. Given that, presumably, people are reading HuSi in a browser, it's not a major crime to use the same format; the crime is just using it badly.


----
Vacuity abhors a vacuum.
[ Parent ]
html is for logical markup by lm (2.00 / 0) #43 Wed Jun 14, 2006 at 09:51:56 AM EST
A text that is logically broken into paragraphs falls quite nicely into the scope of properly written html. This is especially the case if the work has a title which is logically separate from the body and has any sort of headings. That this type of markup is rendered prettily is secondary to the fact that the markup logically matches the content.

But I'm fully with you for use of html that does not  logically mark the text as what it ought to be.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
Death of the Worlds by Gully Foyle (2.00 / 0) #20 Tue Jun 13, 2006 at 12:46:37 AM EST
The allusion is to Wells' War of the Worlds, where the invaders are defeated by (IIRC) the common cold.

[ Parent ]
That by Driusan (2.00 / 0) #22 Tue Jun 13, 2006 at 04:10:18 AM EST
Does explain everything. Thanks.

--
Vive le Montréal libre.
[ Parent ]
The Eighth Wonder by 256 (2.00 / 0) #36 Wed Jun 14, 2006 at 05:45:44 AM EST
I haven't read all the stories yet, but this is my favorite so far.

I wish I could claim it as my own.

Truth be told, none of them are mine. I got about three quarters of the way through an entry but then got too distracted by girl trouble of the best kind to remember about the impending deadline.
---
I don't think anyone's ever really died from smoking. --ni

[ Parent ]
Yeah, I know. by Driusan (2.00 / 0) #37 Wed Jun 14, 2006 at 07:14:58 AM EST
If it was plain text I'd have thought you wrote it, but it's pretty obvious you didn't. It uses valid html. With, like, headers and closed tags and shit. I mean, it even has a DOCTYPE.

--
Vive le Montréal libre.
[ Parent ]
the 8th wonder by aphrael (2.00 / 0) #38 Wed Jun 14, 2006 at 08:14:50 AM EST
seems to be the runaway success of this competition. It deserves to be, at the very least.

Tis a shame you missed the deadline, though. Next time!
If television is a babysitter, the internet is a drunk librarian who won't shut up.

[ Parent ]
Though it doesn't seem to need the extra support. by Christopher Robin was Murdered (2.00 / 0) #25 Tue Jun 13, 2006 at 07:10:27 AM EST
I voted for "The Eighth Wonder." A low key and thoughtful approach. Really great work. Whoever wrote that, you did a damn fine job.

IAWTP by hulver (2.00 / 0) #26 Tue Jun 13, 2006 at 07:13:45 AM EST
A fine story.
--
Cheese is not a hat. - clock
[ Parent ]
Quite by yicky yacky (2.00 / 0) #27 Tue Jun 13, 2006 at 07:25:40 AM EST

I almost didn't vote for it, though; a bit too Shute-ish in angle if not style. I also voted for 'The Idea Double-Sized Annual Spectacular', which I thought was stylistically superb, and one of the two most original in terms of concept, even if it did get a little creaky towards the end. I also intended to vote for 'It's Not Somebody Who's Seen the Light', but plain forgot, so if anyone's who's not yet voted isn't going to vote for that one, if they could squeeze in an extra vote on my behalf, I'd be much obliged.


----
Vacuity abhors a vacuum.
[ Parent ]
Approaches by Christopher Robin was Murdered (2.00 / 0) #29 Tue Jun 13, 2006 at 07:46:09 AM EST
Given how shop worn the concept is, I was pleasantly surprised at how many different approaches there were. I had my doubts, but theantix's topic proved to be quite flexible.

[ Parent ]
Comments on a few of the stories. by hulver (2.00 / 0) #28 Tue Jun 13, 2006 at 07:32:35 AM EST
The Eighth Wonder - Fabulous. Very much a story about people, rather than what happened too them. Many of the stories made the mistake (IMHO) of being about the event, rather than the aftermath. This story doesn't make that mistake. It's also really engaging. A joy to read.

And You Never Ask Directions, Either - Heh. I liked this. Did the old guy really cause the death of the world, or is his wife just used to blaming him for everything :)

The Colony - Vampires in space? Maybe I'm just slow, but it took me a few readings to get this. Was he the only one there, or the only one left. Did the woman he was going to dine (on?) come from the supply ship. I think I'm just too slow to understand this story.

Right. Home time. I'll post some more later.
--
Cheese is not a hat. - clock

Vampires by ShadowNode (2.00 / 0) #48 Sat Jun 17, 2006 at 05:31:45 AM EST
They weren't going to be getting any more dietary iron suppliment shipments from earth.

[ Parent ]
Mini reviews by Scrymarch (4.00 / 1) #35 Tue Jun 13, 2006 at 07:31:37 PM EST
Walking. Nice sketch. Are there no rabbits left?

Neutron. I miss Neutron too, Billy. We all do.

The Eigth Wonder. Great read. This is one of the most civilised apocalypsi ever; I for one approve.

The Idea. Pomotastic, yet still readable. I know it's not the point, but I'd rather read it as a comic ...

Directions. Nono, that button orders grapefruit juice.

Come again. 'The oft-overlooked “beneath the cart” zone' :) ... I like the urgency, but I'm unsure if this story is skirting the edge of the theme, or making the point that a panicked mob is quite enough for a DIY apocalyse.

Wedding guest. Corker of an ending. The Rime of The Zombie Mariner: what rhymes with arrgh I wonder?

Death of the worlds. Nice riffing homage. The chances of anything returning from Mars / Are a million to one they said.

Not somebody who's seen the light. Creepy. Apocalypse as city-dweller apathy.

Colony. Good pulpy read. Had to think about it to get the ending, but intergalactic vampirism ++good.

Voices. God was wrong! </James Mason>

Europa. A CheesburgerBrownian mix of slow-reveal violence and whimsy. It's good, of course, but I'm not sure if it quite ... balances, or something.

Reception. Reminds me of p-m-agapow's description of the works of Ursula Le Guin: A not entirely unpleasant beating about the head with a sociology textbook.

The Color of Rain. Damnit, this is good, but my deep burrowed cynicism is taking issue with a rainbow ending.

To be established. I can completely sympathise with an equation of dinner parties and apocalypse. What what. Runcible spoon.

Happy Anniversary. I like that, by coincidence, the ending of this also makes a good ending for the collection.


The Political Science Department of the University of Woolloomooloo

Damn by Scrymarch (2.00 / 0) #46 Thu Jun 15, 2006 at 02:38:08 PM EST
Missed - actually flat out neglected to read - Salient Point. This was a well contained little story, and I like abrupt endings - shame I missed it on the main pass.

The Political Science Department of the University of Woolloomooloo

[ Parent ]
Was it God at all by aphrael (2.00 / 0) #52 Mon Jun 19, 2006 at 01:00:14 PM EST
Just the (obscure) point I was trying to make by Scrymarch (2.00 / 0) #53 Mon Jun 19, 2006 at 02:10:59 PM EST
The quote is from the James Mason character in Bigger Than Life.

The Political Science Department of the University of Woolloomooloo

[ Parent ]
ahhh, ok. by aphrael (2.00 / 0) #54 Mon Jun 19, 2006 at 02:18:27 PM EST
It was ridiculously obscure by Scrymarch (2.00 / 0) #55 Mon Jun 19, 2006 at 02:26:11 PM EST
That movie's worth it just for that line though.

The Political Science Department of the University of Woolloomooloo

[ Parent ]
my votes by 256 (2.00 / 0) #39 Wed Jun 14, 2006 at 09:08:42 AM EST
The Eighth Wonder
The Idea Double-Sized Annual Spectacular
Happy Anniversary

in no particular order.

great work all
---
I don't think anyone's ever really died from smoking. --ni

a little bit of commentary by 256 (2.00 / 0) #40 Wed Jun 14, 2006 at 09:19:14 AM EST
The Eighth Wonder

The whole thing is beautiful. I love the focus on dialogue. It seems unlikely to me that people will be using derailleurs after the apocalypse though.

The Idea Double-Sized Annual Spectacular

I can't help but feel I've seen the there-will-never-be-a-new-poem schtick used somewhere before, but even if that is borrowed, i can forgive it. this story had me from the description in panel 2. brilliant use of the medium.

Happy Anniversary

I have suspicions regarding who wrote the other two stories that got my vote, but this one is a total mystery. it roped me from the start with it's aesthetically beautiful sentences. i didn't really get into the story until almost three quarters of the way through, but the skillful manner in which the words were placed next to each other was enough to keep me reading. and the story caught me just in time. the last paragraph gave me a physical chill.
---
I don't think anyone's ever really died from smoking. --ni

[ Parent ]
Who wrote what. by Christopher Robin was Murdered (4.00 / 1) #41 Wed Jun 14, 2006 at 09:32:25 AM EST
I thought I knew who wrote what, but I'm finding out that almost all my usual suspects didn't actually enter the contest.

[ Parent ]
So.. by Driusan (2.00 / 0) #42 Wed Jun 14, 2006 at 09:51:55 AM EST
Who do you think wrote what?

--
Vive le Montréal libre.
[ Parent ]
I'm certain I don't know. n/t by Christopher Robin was Murdered (2.00 / 0) #44 Thu Jun 15, 2006 at 05:01:54 AM EST


[ Parent ]
the entire field by Kellnerin (4.00 / 1) #45 Thu Jun 15, 2006 at 12:47:13 PM EST
is really impressive this time around. Thanks to our WFC2 triumvirate CRwMtix256 (hmm, I'll have to remember that for the next time I need a futuristic product name) for making this excellent challenge possible. As I was reading the entries, I thought about half of them had a good chance of winning. I don't even remember which ones I voted for, it was so hard to narrow it down.

Because the week following the WFC deadline always seems so long, here are some thoughts on the stories for those obsessive reloaders out there:



--
"later" meant either "when you walk around the corner" or "oatmeal."
they weren't gratuitous by aphrael (2.00 / 0) #51 Mon Jun 19, 2006 at 12:59:49 PM EST
they were supposed to subtly suggest that Lena was filling the same role in his life that 'God' had before.

That aspect of the story clearly failed. :)

If television is a babysitter, the internet is a drunk librarian who won't shut up.

[ Parent ]
Some picks by spacejack (2.00 / 0) #47 Thu Jun 15, 2006 at 04:54:45 PM EST
I read them in the order they're posted on this page. I was surprised when the first one, Walking, blew me away. Maybe it's just me, or maybe everyone else is insane, but I thought that out of all the entries its voice was most different - enough to actually make me step outside of this reality and into the story's. Which is, I think, something key to a post-apocalypse story. Maybe it was just a ramble, a stream of consciousness piece, or meticulously designed, or parts of all 3, but I couldn't really tell. So it worked for me.

As I read the others, I found I most enjoyed The Eighth Wonder and Happy Anniversary, which was a close contender for being the most immersive and alien. Anniversary gets extra points for style, somehow making it impossible to stop reading its long paragraphs with lots of commas. In the end though I still give the nod to Walking. It most made me want to find out more about its characters and setting.

I didn't have the slightest clue who did Walking when I read it. I have a guess as to who wrote Eighth and Anniversary, and their usernames would start with a C and a f, respectively, but it wouldn't surprise me if I'm way off.

Re: formatting - I prefer HTML because of how browsers display .txt files but I'd recommend just going with a h2 for the title, body and p tags for the rest. My problem with Walking was that if you bump up the font size with ctrl-+, one box obscured the other.

Not to SPOIL the poll, but... by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #49 Mon Jun 19, 2006 at 06:30:44 AM EST
THE GRAPH LOOKS LIKE THE CISCO LOGO TURNT SIDEWAYS.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

And believe me . . . by Christopher Robin was Murdered (4.00 / 1) #50 Mon Jun 19, 2006 at 06:55:06 AM EST
They are paying us a pretty penny for that clever bit of marketing.

[ Parent ]
WFC2: Damn Write – 17 stories enter; one story leaves! | 55 comments (55 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback