Print Story VOTE, dammit. RIGHT NOW!
Wizards and Hobbits
By ana (Sun May 07, 2006 at 12:58:33 PM EST) WFC, Writing Fun Challenge, fun loving cowwqas., Vote! (all tags)
This here's the official Writing Fun Challenge voting place. Enter, vote, and win!

Update [2006-5-8 9:12:16 by gazbo]: "The Man in the 20th Century House" was coming through completely garbled for me, so I've fixed it up and uploaded it here.

Update [2006-5-14 18:37:47 by ana]: We have winner[s]!



Update [2006-5-14 18:37:47 by ana]: Here's the way the voting stood at 50 votes, close of voting period:

results Also, comma, voting for covers went as follows:

  • joh3n: 12 votes (54%)
  • cam: 2 votes (9%)
  • persimmon: 8 votes (36%)
We should do this again sometime.

I'm hoping 256 will now reveal whose story is whose.



Uh, ixnay on the inway thing, but hey.

By special dispensation from Ed Hhulver his own self, we get 22 choices in polls (for now, at least) and as it turns out, there are 22 entries.

I suggest you vote for no more than 3 stories, but of course I can't stop you from voting for as many as you like. There's even an "I hate fiction" entry, which you'll have to find for yourself.

Here we go then:

  1. DullTrev - The Hill (TheHill.txt)
  2. blixco - ed's dead (eds_dead.txt)
  3. ucblockhead - How the little ones died (Hulver)
  4. scrymarch - Temple (WFC1.txt)
  5. greyrat Doubled Duplicity (Doubled Duplicity.txt)
  6. rmg - Ed Goes PNG (ED_goes_PNG.png)
  7. mns - Ed Hulver and the Little People: A Vignette in the Daily Ritual (fiction.txt)
  8. TPD - George and the fairy (George and the fairy.txt)
  9. DullTrev - Diaspora (diaspora.txt)
  10. Christopher Robin was Murdered - Has Anyone Seen Kelly? (Kelly.txt)
  11. randomxs - The Mirrored Menagerie Of Adventurous Pixilates (TheMirroredMenagerieOfAdventurousPixilates.html)
  12. DullTrev - Lord (lord.txt)
  13. yicky yacky - Bouncing Off The Walls (BouncingOffTheWalls.txt)
  14. cam - Ed Lives (ed_lives.html)
  15. CheeseburgerBrown - Dear Master (Dear_Master.txt)
  16. Merekat The Fall and Rise of Ed Hulver (fallandrise.txt)
  17. Kellnerin - The Man in the 20th Century House (20thc-house.txt)
  18. ana - You\'re not Ed Hulver (hulver.txt)
  19. persimmon - Songs of the Redeemed (songsoftheredeemed.html)
  20. georgeha - A shot in the dark (shotdark.txt)
  21. toxicfur - 2:03 (edhulver203.html)
  22. aphrael - The Endless Wheel (wfc.html)

And you can also vote for the album cover, in a separate diary which I'll be posting next. The cover voting story is here.

So stop what you're doing, read all this stuff, and VOTE! I'm dying to find out who wrote what, and we don't get to know that until the voting is done.

We'll close the voting a week hence: 1700 == 5pm EDT == 2100 GMT on Sunday the 14th of May, 2006.

< Non-Mensa Puzzle | BBC White season: 'Rivers of Blood' >
VOTE, dammit. RIGHT NOW! | 127 comments (127 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
voting by dev trash (2.00 / 0) #1 Sun May 07, 2006 at 01:10:39 PM EST
seems to be not here

--
Blizzard of Death '06
In absence of a poll by cam (2.00 / 0) #2 Sun May 07, 2006 at 01:10:41 PM EST
1. The Rise and Fall of Ed Hulver
2. Temple
3. The Hill

cam
Freedom, liberty, equity and an Australian Republic

Fixed. by ana (2.00 / 0) #3 Sun May 07, 2006 at 01:14:58 PM EST
Plz try again, kthxbye.

Can you introspect out loud? --CRwM

[ Parent ]
but first, by Kellnerin (4.00 / 7) #4 Sun May 07, 2006 at 01:19:27 PM EST
Vote this story to the front page!

As much as I bashed my head against this particular theme, I was really impressed by the variety and quality of the entries it produced. Just like in the original blurb/mission statement. There are some seriously talented people on this site, and I'm looking forward to discovering whom I should be adding to my watchlist based on their entries. I thought I had a good short list of stories to vote for, but some of the last-minute entries are so excellent, now I'm not so sure. Good thing we have a week to decide.

I know this, though:

groan

brains

groan

brains

groan

brains

may be my new favorite opening to a piece of fiction.

I was listening to my H5N1 playlist while reading a bunch of the stories, and I think a meta-MFC of songs based on/inspired by the WFC entries would rock almost as much. C'mon -- Ed Hulver: the Musical. You know you want to.

--
"later" meant either "when you walk around the corner" or "oatmeal."

You are right by cam (2.00 / 0) #29 Tue May 09, 2006 at 04:37:57 AM EST
Ed Lives is awesome and everyone should vote for it, since it is currently on 0%

cam
Freedom, liberty, equity and an Australian Republic

[ Parent ]
groan brains by hulver (4.00 / 1) #31 Tue May 09, 2006 at 04:55:28 AM EST
I liked it, but I couldn't vote for it because of the horrendous mistakes.

What's black sausage?

And the accents. Urgh, it totally put me off.

It's as bad as people in the "Charlie and the Chocolate factory" film talking in English accents but saying "Candy" all the time. It just screams "WRONG WRONG WRONG WRONG WRONG" and pulls me out of the story.
--
Cheese is not a hat. - clock

[ Parent ]
Yeah by DullTrev (2.00 / 0) #32 Tue May 09, 2006 at 05:00:51 AM EST

And the accents. Urgh, it totally put me off.
Yeah, I feel the same way about Yorkshire accents.


--
DFJ?
[ Parent ]
black sausage is black pudding isnt it? by cam (2.00 / 0) #33 Tue May 09, 2006 at 05:04:30 AM EST
Thought everyone in England called chocolate candy?

cam
Freedom, liberty, equity and an Australian Republic

[ Parent ]
there is just by Kellnerin (2.00 / 0) #34 Tue May 09, 2006 at 05:19:45 AM EST
too! much! awesomeness!

I enjoyed "Ed Lives," but the ending didn't live up to the promise of the beginning, I felt. With so many entries I bet there'll be a lot of fine stories that deserve votes, but don't quite make the top three when people go to click the checkboxes.

--
"later" meant either "when you walk around the corner" or "oatmeal."

[ Parent ]
I shall have to set up hulverbay.com by cam (4.00 / 2) #35 Tue May 09, 2006 at 05:35:45 AM EST
so people can strategically trade MFC, WFC and CFC votes. At least Driusan chickened out of entering the WFC so I dont have him beating the crap out of me again.

cam
Freedom, liberty, equity and an Australian Republic

[ Parent ]
WIPO: by Driusan (4.00 / 1) #36 Tue May 09, 2006 at 08:55:56 AM EST
Driusan's aborted story. (Pretend this comment is rated 4 from # of cam votes + 1 of my dupe accounts.)

--
Vive le Montréal libre.
[ Parent ]
Placeholder by gazbo (4.00 / 1) #5 Sun May 07, 2006 at 01:39:38 PM EST
Fixed the link to the cover challenge.  I guess it'll take me some time to read all these, so I'll not be actually voting for a day or two.

I recommend always assuming 7th normal form where items in a text column are not allowed to rhyme.

i think that's fairly common. by aphrael (2.00 / 0) #12 Sun May 07, 2006 at 07:23:05 PM EST
Ok, we can only vote for one story? by randomxs (2.00 / 0) #6 Sun May 07, 2006 at 02:12:43 PM EST
I thought we could vote for example:
1st
2nd
3rd
4th
etc...

Or did I FAIL IT?

"When a person can no longer laugh at himself, it is time for others to laugh at him." - Thomas Szasz

You don't hafta rank them by ana (4.00 / 1) #7 Sun May 07, 2006 at 02:25:52 PM EST
But I thought you should only vote for 3. If you want to vote for more, go for it.

Can you introspect out loud? --CRwM

[ Parent ]
it wont let me /nt by randomxs (2.00 / 0) #8 Sun May 07, 2006 at 02:34:40 PM EST


"When a person can no longer laugh at himself, it is time for others to laugh at him." - Thomas Szasz
[ Parent ]
Has Anyone Seen Kelly? is great. by Driusan (2.00 / 0) #9 Sun May 07, 2006 at 02:37:32 PM EST
The only problem with it is that the title makes it sound boring.

--
Vive le Montréal libre.
Addendum by Driusan (2.00 / 0) #10 Sun May 07, 2006 at 03:12:03 PM EST
I missed one of my tabs in Safari before voting. Otherwise I'd have voted for Songs of the Redeemed too.

(and Ed's Dead, and How The Little Ones Died)

Why does every story seem to either have Hulver dying, killing little people, or drinking?

--
Vive le Montréal libre.

[ Parent ]
not all of them are like that.../nt by randomxs (2.00 / 0) #14 Mon May 08, 2006 at 02:57:07 AM EST


"When a person can no longer laugh at himself, it is time for others to laugh at him." - Thomas Szasz
[ Parent ]
I think we're all afraid of outing ourselves by persimmon (4.00 / 1) #11 Sun May 07, 2006 at 03:17:38 PM EST
So we're not rounding up our impressions of all the other stories, lest someone pounce and say "A-ha! YOU did not review 'Ed's Dead', so you must have written it!"

I mean, not that I wrote "Ed's Dead". Or "Has Anyone Seen Kelly?". But I wish I had.
-----
"Nature is such a fucking plagarist."

well, one can by Kellnerin (4.00 / 1) #13 Mon May 08, 2006 at 02:15:18 AM EST
  • deny having submitted a story
  • review some but not all of the entries
  • include a review of one's own story as a red herring
  • any combination of the above
But mostly I'm still letting most of the stories sink in so far.

--
"later" meant either "when you walk around the corner" or "oatmeal."
[ Parent ]
Fifth Option by Christopher Robin was Murdered (2.00 / 0) #15 Mon May 08, 2006 at 08:56:11 AM EST
You could always claim ownership of all the stories.

[ Parent ]
The... by ana (4.00 / 2) #16 Mon May 08, 2006 at 09:04:01 AM EST
we're all mrgoat option.

Can you introspect out loud? --CRwM

[ Parent ]
You mean we're not? [nt] by debacle (2.00 / 0) #27 Mon May 08, 2006 at 06:52:45 PM EST


IF YOU HAVE TWO FIRLES THOROWNF MONEY ART SUOCIDE GIRLS STRIPPER HPW CAN YPUS :OSE?!?!?!?(elcevisides).

[ Parent ]
Sixth option. by Driusan (4.00 / 2) #17 Mon May 08, 2006 at 09:12:42 AM EST
We can start a thread with guesses of who wrote what, and you can intentionally misattribute yours.

--
Vive le Montréal libre.
[ Parent ]
I'd Have to Misattribute All of Them. by Christopher Robin was Murdered (4.00 / 3) #18 Mon May 08, 2006 at 09:15:00 AM EST
Because they're all mine.

[ Parent ]
or you can just ask the person who controls by 256 (2.00 / 0) #25 Mon May 08, 2006 at 01:05:29 PM EST
the database where most people entered their names and IPs while submitting the stories.

unfortunately, i am scheduled to forget the English language later tonight, so all queries will have to be translated into DrugsBoozeAndHookersish
---
I don't think anyone's ever really died from smoking. --ni

[ Parent ]
Huh? by Driusan (2.00 / 0) #26 Mon May 08, 2006 at 01:18:02 PM EST
How would we figure out who that is?

--
Vive le Montréal libre.
[ Parent ]
look up the dns records by aphrael (2.00 / 0) #28 Mon May 08, 2006 at 08:27:58 PM EST
I think people might also by yicky yacky (2.00 / 0) #47 Thu May 11, 2006 at 05:51:09 AM EST

be aware of the possibility of slighting others unintentionally.

For example: If I wrote, "I think X wrote Y", X might be all "LOLZ. No Wayz. That's crap. How dare ch00." (although using more literate and florid verbiage).

It's also tempting to attribute stories to people based on the flimsiest of pretexts. For example, I was tempted to ascribe "You're not Ed Hulver" or "2:03" to the HuSians of more widely-ranging sexuality / gender, simply because those stories discussed those ideas. Likewise, I was tempted to surmise that 'Temple' must have been written by an Aussie / Kiwi / UKie as I'm uncertain how well-known David Boon is beyond the sphere of cricket-playing countries (represented on HuSi). Ditto guessing that the stories witten in column-wrapped text format were either by devs, unix-users or usenet-afficionados, as those demographics would be more likely to understand the reason for formatting this way. That doesn't mean that these guesses are necessarily wrong, just that they would be made for not-necessarily-good reasons.

I think I've figured-out blixco's, CRwM's, Kellnerin's, toxicfur's, Cheesy's, cam's, georgeha's and some others, but don't even know for sure that they've necessarily participated, so am, in all likelihood, quite wrong. In such circumstances, it seems wiser to stay quiet, whether a person has even entered or not. Today is the first time I've had a chance to read them all through, though, so my opinions will probably change post-more-considered-mulling.


----
Vacuity abhors a vacuum.
[ Parent ]
or, more self-censoriously by persimmon (4.00 / 7) #48 Thu May 11, 2006 at 08:49:23 AM EST
"I think X wrote Y, and X is my friend, so I dare not point out in a public forum how crappy it is."

Although people have done fine in the MFCs, where everything is out in the open anyway. So, here's my asshole mini-reviews, in a Kellnerinian obfuscatory style:


The Hill
It hurts less after the first time. A little.
ed's dead
I voted for it despite the moral tacked on the end. Nice job painting Jody.
How the little ones died
Readable despite using leprechauns; needs less how and more why.
Temple
Meh.
Doubled Duplicity
I don't entirely understand what either the other duplicity or the little people are in this story. Despite that, it flows nicely.
Ed goes PNG
Meh.
Ed Hulver and the Little People: A Vignette in the Daily Ritual
That's nice.
George and the Fairy
Terrible formatting. Reminds me of the stories where they end up at the girl's house and her mother says she's been dead for 20 years.
Diaspora
It's good, but I don't understand why people love it so.
Has anyone seen Kelly?
This is also good, though I don't understand why I love it so despite its leprechaun use.
The Mirrored Menagerie Of Adventurous Pixilates
It's creative, I'll grant you that, but there's no "menagerie", and I think the physiology is pretty bad. HEALTH PROFESSIONAL HIT YOU WITH CARP.
Lord
Meh.
Bouncing Off the Walls
Really nice setup. Negligible story.
Ed Lives
Lovely opening, craptastic ending.
Dear Master
Misspelled "Aloysius". Used leprechauns.
The Fall and Rise of Ed Hulver
Fun to read, but not much of a story. Crappy dialogue formatting.
The Man in the 20th Century House
I disliked the ending. The rest was quite engaging, up to the part about nothing being edible.
You're not Ed Hulver
I'm pretty sure I've read this story before.
Songs of the Redeemed
Has the most far-flung "little people" and "Ed Hulver", but is largely incoherent. Also, nothing actually happens in the story.
A shot in the dark
Misuse of Strep pyogenes. Ending is a kid's horror story rehash, like "George and the Fairy".
2:03
I like the main character. I don't understand what's up with the time. Torturers don't use batteries?
The Endless Wheel
Again with the fucking leprechauns. Can't you people think of anything else? Beyond the leprechaun crap, this is clearly in the vein of some style I've never read, and I feel like I'm missingn background for what happens in the story.

I was surprised how many stories went ahead and used freaking leprechauns, after encouragement to misinterpret in the assignment.
-----
"Nature is such a fucking plagarist."

[ Parent ]
more short takes by aphrael (4.00 / 2) #50 Thu May 11, 2006 at 10:19:30 AM EST
My take, now that someone's done it:

The Hill
    It doesn't really hurt less after the first time. Part of the reason it hurts is that the description of the character was so phenomenal; I really wanted to love the story after the first couple of paragraphs.

ed's dead
    Fantastic description, but the moral at the end of the story ruined it for me.

How the little ones died
    I know the author hasn't seen Revenge of the Sith, but the whole time I was reading it I was thinking "oh no, he killed the younglings!"

Temple
    Is there a plot? Is there character development? Is this a story?

Doubled Duplicity
    Huh? I don't understand this story at all.

Ed goes PNG
    I can't read this story.

Ed Hulver and the Little People: A Vignette in the Daily Ritual
    100% agreement with Persimmon.

George and the Fairy
    Interesting Twilight Zone episode idea; the ending dialogue is lame.

Diaspora
    Fantastic idea, well executed. Good job, sir!

Has anyone seen Kelly?
    Well-done, but I don't get what the singing is all about, and i wasn't convinced to care.

The Mirrored Menagerie of Adventurous Pixilates
    Fun concept, but the ending didn't work for me; even as it called into relief what was happening, it let me down. Still ... this is sort of the stuff dreams are made of, and with a different way to provide the context, it would have been fantastic.

Lord
    Oh Lord, why hast thou forsaken me?

Bouncing Off the Walls
    I liked it. It feels like it's cut out of a larger story, but the mood and the setting are spot on. Good job!

Ed Lives
    What persimmon said.

Dear Master
    I prefer my softcore gay porn to not involve celebrities, thank you.

The Fall and Rise of Ed Hulver
    See above, under 'Temple'.

The Man in the 20th Century House
    Persimmon was absolutely correct.

You're not Ed Hulver
   Very good descriptions, and i'm now very curious what ed was up to.

Songs of the Redeemed
   I don't quite understand what happens in this story, but it conveys mood better than anything i've read in some time. Incredible and awesome, whoever wrote it should write more.

A shot in the dark
  Interesting concept, although it is yet another Sisyphus story.

2:03
  Well done and creepy.

The Endless Wheel
  Interesting concept, so-so execution; the action scene in particular sucked.

If television is a babysitter, the internet is a drunk librarian who won't shut up.

[ Parent ]
Freaking Little People by Christopher Robin was Murdered (2.00 / 0) #51 Thu May 11, 2006 at 10:43:41 AM EST
I'm of the mind that avoiding leprechauns was a bad idea, unless you had a truly compelling alternative.

In a story this short, you need to get people inside the work as soon as possible. Using their expectations to have them do some of the work saves you set-up space and trims off huge amounts of narrative-killing exposition.

Say "leprechaun" and you've spared yourself having to explain anything else about the "little people." People will assume they know exactly what you mean and you can focus on plotting and characterization.

You don't need to waste space on details your reader with provide for free. And at a couple thousand words, every inch is needed.

Furthermore, avoiding leprechauns proved, as far as I can tell, distracting. Readers spent their time wondering how you were going to fulfill the assignment specs and not suspending their disbelief. With a few exceptions, I think it encouraged critical distance and blocked reader response.

[ Parent ]
i'm not sure i agree. by aphrael (2.00 / 0) #52 Thu May 11, 2006 at 10:57:54 AM EST
The two I liked best, for example, didn't use leprechauns.

There's something to what you say about being able to go farther if you're playing on the preconcieved notions of your audience; but sometimes the fresh new surprise is more compelling, like.
If television is a babysitter, the internet is a drunk librarian who won't shut up.

[ Parent ]
My Votes by Christopher Robin was Murdered (2.00 / 0) #54 Thu May 11, 2006 at 11:12:54 AM EST
Two of my three votes went to stories that didn't use the Lucky Charms mascot, so I agree that it was certainly possible to make great stories that avoided them.


[ Parent ]
disagree by persimmon (2.00 / 0) #53 Thu May 11, 2006 at 11:05:18 AM EST
At risk of giving away my entry, it was way, way under 2k words. Sometimes the story needs all that space. Sometimes it doesn't. Using convention as a shortcut could only help if you have genuine story that needs to go in the space it leaves.

In this case, none of the leprechaun stories took advantage of that. Most of the stories weren't so good; I don't think the leprechaun-containing ones were, on average, any better.
-----
"Nature is such a fucking plagarist."

[ Parent ]
That doesn't really give anything away by aphrael (2.00 / 0) #56 Thu May 11, 2006 at 11:21:38 AM EST
The Hill: 671
Ed's Dead: 696
How The Little Ones Died: 729
The Temple: 556
Doubled Duplicity: 1745
Ed Goes PNG: ?
A Vignette in the Daily Ritual: 25
George and the Fairy: 990
Diaspora: 1996
Has Anyone Seen Kelly?: 1993
The Mirrored Menagerie of Adventurous Pixilates: 1208
Lord: 746
Bouncing Off The Walls: 1999
Ed Lives: 789
Dear Master: 1553
The Fall and Rise of Ed Hulver: 712
The Man in the 20th Century House: 2019
You're Not ed Hulver: 1749
Songs Of The Redeemed: 1339
A Shot in the Dark: 1149
2:03: 1999
The Endless Wheel: 1810

The average length (ignoring 'A vignette in the daily ritual' because it would break the curve, and ignoring 'Ed Goes PNG' because I can't be arsed to count it): 1322
If television is a babysitter, the internet is a drunk librarian who won't shut up.

[ Parent ]
addendum by persimmon (2.00 / 0) #55 Thu May 11, 2006 at 11:14:26 AM EST
I partially retract my earlier statement; The Endless Wheel actually did use canon leprachaunism to what could have been good effect, but it didn't exploit the advantage that could have given it. Moreover, it had to spend time explaining the respects in which Endless Wheel leprechauns differed from canon (for lack of my ability to think of a better word right now) leprechauns, so it still lost time on exposition.
-----
"Nature is such a fucking plagarist."
[ Parent ]
Agree to Disagree by Christopher Robin was Murdered (2.00 / 0) #58 Thu May 11, 2006 at 11:35:07 AM EST
My comments were intended as more of a "planning for the future" sort of thing.

Looking at the poll, I think the plot-oriented stories are winning out over the prose-portrait type.

For future contests, writers might want to think of ways to cut down on mood and tone generating explication in favor of strong narrative. One way to do this would be to rely more strongly on reader's expectations, letting conventions handle more of the weight of backstory.

Just my two cents.

[ Parent ]
perhaps by aphrael (2.00 / 0) #61 Thu May 11, 2006 at 12:02:30 PM EST
Let Mood and Tone Emerge from Narrative by Christopher Robin was Murdered (2.00 / 0) #63 Thu May 11, 2006 at 12:21:37 PM EST
True, but I feel mood and tone can emerge from narrative action; whereas a strong narrative rarely emerges out of efforts to create mood and tone.

This is just my opinion, but mood and tone can be produced with a few well placed adjectives. A good story can weave it into the plot structure.

On the other hand, deliberate efforts to put mood and tone ahead of narrative thrust tend to leave the writer stuck in a sort of purple prose swamp. They find a nice voice and create an effective mood, but they don't have a story. It's the writing craft equivalent of getting all dressed up with nowhere to go.

This is, of course, just my opinion.

[ Parent ]
mood and tone can emerge from narrative by aphrael (2.00 / 0) #64 Thu May 11, 2006 at 12:31:11 PM EST
but it's important to dedicate some effort to them, i think, and not just assume that they will emerge.

besides which, the same narrative has different meanings if its set in different tones. :)

If television is a babysitter, the internet is a drunk librarian who won't shut up.

[ Parent ]
Everything Requires Effort by Christopher Robin was Murdered (2.00 / 0) #66 Thu May 11, 2006 at 12:36:43 PM EST
I'm not saying ignore mood and tone. I agree that tone and mood are important. Within the context of a story with only a couple thousand words, however, as many words need to do double-duty as is possible. So, says I, weave the mood and tone in.

Anyway, that's what I tried to do. I guess I'll have some sense of whether it worked or not after Sunday.

[ Parent ]
yeah. by aphrael (2.00 / 0) #67 Thu May 11, 2006 at 12:51:55 PM EST
I started with an idea, then found the mood and the setting, and had a plot outline. But the details of the hinge of the plot never actually came to me at all, and when I was writing it I realized that it might work without the details.

It did, sorta.

But certainly being more plot-driven from the get-go would have made it easier to write. :)

If television is a babysitter, the internet is a drunk librarian who won't shut up.

[ Parent ]
To respond in kind by yicky yacky (4.00 / 5) #62 Thu May 11, 2006 at 12:15:03 PM EST
The one I wrote whilst drunk
Fucking incredible; the best shit this site's ever seen.
The ones everyone else wrote
Tepid, run-of-the-mill, derivative crap. Do you people get the entirety of your aesthetic from Hollywood's output?

Or, more seriously:

The Hill
Essentially a joke. Like those movies that sell themselves on a cognitively dissonant premise that they change in the last five minutes and hence escape having to justify every question they posed of themselves to maintain the audience's attention. However: awesomely-written to the point where it made me chuckle-groan; didn't try to do too much in a short story and I rated the Dostoevskian element of the effort-to-pay-off ratio. Voted for.
Ed's dead
One of the best-written and seriously-approached. Quality is harder to pull off when setting your stall out like this, as opposed to the colloquial chat style. Liked it a lot. Arbitrarily docked it %5 percent for gratuitous, po-faced worthiness, though, and hence it just missed the cut. Without my mean-spiritedness, would have been at or near the top.
How the little one's died
Held my attention. Good atmosphere piece. Too many open questions. Why? Why do I care?
Temple
"My youth's gone. Shit."
Doubled Duplicity
Author has watched too much Shyamalan. Gripped me, but didn't quite have enough pay-off.
Ed goes PNG
Faintly racist tuggery.
Ed Hulver and the Little People: A Vignette in the Daily Ritual
Artless K5ian shit.
George and the Fairy
Again; essentially a joke. Liked the black humour and the cheap-payoff-per-effort element. Not quite enough to get a vote.
Diaspora
Liked it. Carried a resonant urban myth style throughout. Didn't try to do too much. Voted for.
Has anyone seen Sean Kelly?
Really liked this. Terrific start but it slowly let itself down. Little things didn't add up. Firstly: If the Leprechaun could get out, why didn't he run away? (unless he had a deal with Hulver - in which case it's far too similar to a Will Self short story involving butterflies). Secondly: If he could get out, why didn't he kill the house-sitter at the first opportunity? Thirdly: If he could get out, why the persistent rigmarole with the salt? Fourthly; If he ate meat, why the need to kill? Fifthly: Was the leprechaun just a ruse and the cash came from the series of House-sitters? I get the feeling that I haven't properly understood this one (which is entirely possible), but whichever interpretation I tried (many more than I've gone into here), I couldn't get it to add-up. Shame, as the tone and build-up were great.
The Mirrored Menagerie Of Adventurous Pixilates
The opposite effect of numerous others: Thought it was shit at first, and possibly the result of the author playing too many MMORPGs, only to conclude that I was completely wrong and it was an intentional set-up. Voted for it just because of the flip effect. No leprechauns; good extrapolation of 'little people'. Think the 'menagerie' was meant to be the entire panoply of organic entities within the body as environment metaphor. Voted for, just because it caught me and I enjoyed that.
Lord
Too much like toadying tuggery for my liking.
Bouncing off the Walls
Like '... seen Kelly?' and others, had a great set-up which then died away. As with 'The Hill', the shit pun made me laugh. Voted for.
Ed Lives
Made me laugh. Never was a fan of the Scoopian zombie meme though but, as Kellnerin said, it made for a good start. Cultural dissonance with the lingo: Sounded non-UK in parts and more northern than midlandish in others.
Dear Master
Made me LOL a lot during the first quarter and liked the absurd set-up. Again, ebbed away as the original start gave way to more conventional (i.e. tired) observations and jokes. By the end, it reads more like an amusing K5 comment from three years ago. Shades of 'The Screwtape Letters' in the style.
The Fall and Rise of Ed Hulver
More mid-life crises from the tertiary services sector. No; the blue streak isn't important; it's hollow, shallow; it's a token. The state of mind, on the other hand, is important. Suspect the author is entering a traditionally transitional period age-wise and wants to persist with unnecessary illusions. A philosophical, more than writing-skill, observation (the writing was excellent), but intent is everything. Buy a skateboard.
The Man in the 20th Century House
Think this is Cheeseburger. Apologies, dear Cheesy, if that offends. Liked the start; stylistically slick and gripping. Tapered away when they went underground. Exploding houses are stylish and a conveniently idiosyncratic plot device, but still make no sense whatsoever. But: I'm broadly against vampires (and anything self-indulgently-gothic) as a personal aesthetic. Too geekishly hackneyed. Nothing against the story, but it was a subjective minus-point.
You're not Ed Hulver
Jumpy and dissonant. Quite liked the style as an overt choice but it became distracting half-way through. Slight WTF? element, which works as a hook but can be off-putting.
Songs Of The Redeemed
Like "Ed's dead", this was one of the scarce attempts at "serious creative writing". Am always torn, when it comes to such overt artistry, between "That's coming from a higher plane" and "Get off your high horse". However, as mentioned before, that style is much harder to pull off well than simply being conversational and I felt it was done excellently and with genuine craftspersonship. Didn't have an "Oh, fuck you" response at all. Voted for.
A shot in the dark
Really liked this. Not so keen on the insanity / idiosyncrasy ambiguity as I feel it's been done to death as a trope. The actions of the little people and Ed's reaction to them were great, though, and the seedling idea (where do those unknown scrapes come from?) was developed to a sinister, yet funny, extreme. Just missed getting voted-for.
2:03
Liked the kangaroo. Shades of surrealism and Kafka. I want to know what they were up to. Suspect it's aph's. Also just-missed a vote.
Endless Wheel
Dickian. Very good, but overtly Dickian (swapping droids for leprechauns). Felt I'd read it before, although I hadn't.

Yah. I voted for five. Bite moi.


----
Vacuity abhors a vacuum.
[ Parent ]
What? It's Rigged! by Christopher Robin was Murdered (4.00 / 1) #19 Mon May 08, 2006 at 10:27:02 AM EST
I though "Bouncing" and "Diaspora" were going to run off with this thing.

Let me make my complex, nuanced pitch for those two works.

In the often vapid and lifeless genre of "little people" fiction, some visionary writers are able to fuse our post-colonial concerns with a meta-ironic sensibility, re-inventing a the language in a supernova of wit and craftsmanship that blends the seriousness of high modernity with the knowingly innocent cynicism of post-modernity.

But that's neither here nor there.

"Bouncing" and "Diaspora" both kick ass and deserve more votes.

 

heh. by aphrael (2.00 / 0) #20 Mon May 08, 2006 at 10:37:29 AM EST
ME too by georgeha (2.00 / 0) #44 Tue May 09, 2006 at 04:14:35 PM EST



[ Parent ]
Heh by hulver (2.00 / 0) #21 Mon May 08, 2006 at 11:10:42 AM EST
I can't wait to find out who wrote Lord.

Stalker :)
--
Cheese is not a hat. - clock

Damn! I shoulda wrote one! /nt by randomxs (4.00 / 2) #22 Mon May 08, 2006 at 11:40:09 AM EST


"When a person can no longer laugh at himself, it is time for others to laugh at him." - Thomas Szasz
you should have! by Kellnerin (2.00 / 0) #23 Mon May 08, 2006 at 12:03:39 PM EST
Hopefully, the winner of this round will propose a new challenge and you can rectify the situation next time.

--
"later" meant either "when you walk around the corner" or "oatmeal."
[ Parent ]
it would be awesome by aphrael (2.00 / 0) #24 Mon May 08, 2006 at 12:37:56 PM EST
you didnt write any?? by skydancer (2.00 / 0) #49 Thu May 11, 2006 at 09:28:12 AM EST
hells bells, here i thought you wrote about 4 of them!!!

[ Parent ]
THERE ARE TOO MANY.... by randomxs (4.00 / 2) #30 Tue May 09, 2006 at 04:43:44 AM EST
NULLO DUPEZ VOTING!!!

HAND, KTHX

"When a person can no longer laugh at himself, it is time for others to laugh at him." - Thomas Szasz

Huh. by blixco (4.00 / 4) #37 Tue May 09, 2006 at 09:25:10 AM EST
The little dashed line is doing better than my entry.

Yay!
---------------------------------
Taken out of context I must seem so strange - Ani DiFranco

The Lesson I've Learned. by Christopher Robin was Murdered (4.00 / 6) #38 Tue May 09, 2006 at 11:12:52 AM EST
Through Zen-like inaction, theantix has pretty much blown all the other entries away.

The conclusion is obvious. As the great philosopher Ammonius of Alexandria said: "The only winning move is not to play."

Or that might have been Joshua from War Games. I always confuse the two.

[ Parent ]
the other option by Kellnerin (4.00 / 3) #39 Tue May 09, 2006 at 11:28:16 AM EST
The secret may be staying above the fray, or it may be name recognition that's the key. So to test this, next time, I'm going to spell my name down the left side in acrostic. Or better yet, theantix's name.

Meanwhile, I think we should disqualify the dashed line. I just don't see how it fits the theme at all.

--
"later" meant either "when you walk around the corner" or "oatmeal."

[ Parent ]
It's short hand by ana (2.00 / 0) #40 Tue May 09, 2006 at 12:01:46 PM EST
for -- ------ and the ------ ------.

Can you introspect out loud? --CRwM

[ Parent ]
brevity is the soul by Kellnerin (3.00 / 1) #42 Tue May 09, 2006 at 02:09:15 PM EST
It's On Theme. by Christopher Robin was Murdered (4.00 / 1) #41 Tue May 09, 2006 at 12:09:46 PM EST
But it's tricky.

Adjust your screen and you'll see that the "dashes" are really the words "Ed," "Hulver," and "The People."

And it's all real little. Get it?

[ Parent ]
damn LCD screens by Kellnerin (4.00 / 1) #43 Tue May 09, 2006 at 02:13:27 PM EST
Well, I can't compete with that. I agree with blixco, something is very wrong if my entry gets more votes than the dashes.

Vote ---!

--
"later" meant either "when you walk around the corner" or "oatmeal."

[ Parent ]
If the MFCs are any judge by cam (2.00 / 0) #45 Wed May 10, 2006 at 12:13:35 PM EST
then novelty is rewarded - tix is a novelty?

cam
Freedom, liberty, equity and an Australian Republic

[ Parent ]
whoever wrote ed's dead could be the next Flannery by lm (2.00 / 0) #46 Wed May 10, 2006 at 07:39:22 PM EST
As in O'Conner.

I just hope you don't have lupus like poor Flannery.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
FRIGGIN' INTENSE by persimmon (4.00 / 4) #57 Thu May 11, 2006 at 11:34:58 AM EST
I've taken the liberty of reviewing some of the WFC entries as MNS would. The REALLY IMPORTANT ones, that is.

ed's dead
-2, fucking boring AND fucking moralizing
How the little ones died
I'm pretty glad it wasn't puppies that died in this story.
Temple
-1, doesn't discuss the cute chick enough
Doubled Duplicity
Has women in swimsuits, and a possible zombie.
Ed Hulver and the Little People: A Vignette in the Daily Ritual
TOTALLY AWESOME! FRIGGIN' INTENSE! Could only be better if it had hot dogs!
Has anyone seen Kelly?
HOT DOGS!
Ed Lives
ZOMG!
The Man in the 20th Century House
Vampires are not NEARLY as good as zombies.
You're not Ed Hulver
+1, implies boobies; -1, boobies are IMPLIED
Songs of the Redeemed
Apocalypse not due to zombies! Inexcusable!
A shot in the dark
This story would be better if zombies ate the guy instead.

-----
"Nature is such a fucking plagarist."
OMFG! Someone Said Zombies! by Christopher Robin was Murdered (4.00 / 1) #59 Thu May 11, 2006 at 11:39:58 AM EST
Now do my reviews!

[ Parent ]
not 'til you've stayed at my house at least twice by persimmon (4.00 / 2) #60 Thu May 11, 2006 at 11:43:38 AM EST
And who knows how long that could be? I offer you a rain cheque.
-----
"Nature is such a fucking plagarist."
[ Parent ]
Hey, I have half an hour... by ana (4.00 / 4) #65 Thu May 11, 2006 at 12:36:13 PM EST
so in the spirit of persimmon's review-everything, here goes... Nothing authoritative as organizer, just my opinions as a reader.
  1. The Hill. A joke, right?
  2. Ed's Dead I liked this one. Whoever said it's reminiscent of Flannery O'Connor has a point.
  3. How the Little Ones Died Interesting and engaging. The eyes are following me around, I think.
  4. Temple Interesting take on the Little People theme. +1 cute asian chick.
  5. Doubled Duplicity. I quite liked this one, though I still have no idea what it's about. I voted for it.
  6. Ed Goes PNG. Interesting joke.
  7. Vignette meh.
  8. George and the Fairy. I liked the intimate look at death. Hate the non-ASCII characters.
  9. Diaspora. I like this one a lot. Voted for; nice conceit that's carried right through.
  10. Has Anyone Seen Kelly? I liked this one a lot, too, though more info about how the magic worked and why it ultimately failed (the salt ring) would have helped.
  11. Menagerie Um, huh. A joke gone bad.
  12. Lord. Like hulver said.
  13. Bouncing off the Walls Day in the life of a bowling pin??!?
  14. Ed Lives Too much in the way of zombies; gratuitous toss-in of little people.
  15. Dear Master Started out really strong, kind of went into a help of empty clothes after that.
  16. The Fall and Rise of Ed Hulver ummmkaaay... I've been at trade shows, and it captures the atmosphere nicely.
  17. The Man in the 20th Century House Nicely creepy. Voted for this one.
  18. You're Not Ed Hulver I'm pretty sure I've read this before someplace.
  19. Songs of the Redeemed Lots of jargon, correctly used (as far as I can see). Um, I find several days later I don't recall what it was about.
  20. A shot in the dark Creepy. I think the main character's nuts, personally.
  21. 2:03 Should be made into a proper story.
  22. The Endless Wheel Nice spy fic. I liked it a lot.
So I ended up with 4 on the short list, and voted for 4.

Can you introspect out loud? --CRwM

But I like zombies and vampyres by cam (2.00 / 0) #97 Mon May 15, 2006 at 09:12:34 AM EST
I was completely plastered.. by randomxs (2.00 / 0) #68 Thu May 11, 2006 at 06:14:19 PM EST
on salvia when I wrote one...probably shows too

"When a person can no longer laugh at himself, it is time for others to laugh at him." - Thomas Szasz
another take by Kellnerin (4.00 / 4) #69 Fri May 12, 2006 at 05:01:50 AM EST
In contrast to persimmon's anti-leprechaun metric and CRwM's pro-plot one, I submit that the thing that makes or breaks a story, especially one of this length, is its ending. So, herewith Kellnerin's review of endings:

  1. The Hill Too much setup for too little joke.
  2. Ed's Dead The moral feels tacked on; I liked the middle part of this one best, actually.
  3. How the little ones died I liked this one. Bringing it back around to the title and the theme of the story made it feel complete, but I wish the story itself had a bit more meat.
  4. Temple Ending falls off the edge of a cliff. That's fine as a stylistic choice, but less satisfying to read. Some good imagery but it doesn't go anywhere.
  5. Doubled Duplicity I liked the structure of the story with the intertwined storylines, and wanted to like the story as a whole, but the ending made me go "huh?"
  6. Ed Goes PNG In-joke wrapped in a nonsequitur. As others have said, meh.
  7. Ed Hulver and the Little People: A Vignette in the Daily Ritual At least no time was wasted getting to the punchline.
  8. George and the fairy Good atmosphere, but the ending fell flat for me. Ed Hulver was billed as a cameo in the original blurb, though a lot of the stories used him as a fairly major character; in this story, Ed was a bit too incidental.
  9. Diaspora Really excellent. It's a punchline that doesn't rely on reversing your expectations; it builds on everything that's come before rather than undercutting it. I liked the framing device with the recording providing backstory, as well.
  10. Has Anyone Seen Kelly? Plotwise, the ending isn't remarkable but the echo of the "thick as thieves" gives it a nice rounded, complete feeling. Caps off a strong story.
  11. The Mirrored Menagerie Of Adventurous Pixilates I figured out what was going on around "yellow estuary" so the ending didn't have quite as much punch for me.
  12. Lord Ditto, I got the joke a few paragraphs before the end.
  13. Bouncing Off The Walls The pun was fine, but I felt like I was missing something in the elaborate setup. Nicely written, but left me confused.
  14. Ed Lives Maybe it's just me, but the extra beat in "I am" instead of "I'm" threw off the rhythm of that last line for me. But more importantly, it's just thrown in there. What if instead of the woman just telling him about the midget farm, she says Ed's been chosen for an important role that will help more zombies be resurrected. He heartily agrees, while she is leading him to his new post. Ed: "Anything to help, as long as it's got nothing to do with midgets, ha ha." Mysterious woman: "Uh, now you mention it ..." Door to midget barn (or whatever) opens. Hilarity more likely to ensue, IMHO, but YMMV.
  15. Dear Master The letter form comes with a built-in sense of closure, but it seems like it would have been better to keep the letter itself short and sweet.
  16. The Fall and Rise of Ed Hulver Good title, good opening; I wasn't feeling the ending.
  17. The Man in the 20th Century House Where there should have been a punchline or some kind of resolution, there was a vampire ex machina.
  18. You're not Ed Hulver I liked that this one ended on a positive note, instead of a jokey, tragic, or neutral one like so many others.
  19. Songs of the Redeemed I know nothing happens. I liked the language and the atmosphere anyway. Cool way of incorporating Ed Hulver, unexpected but not coming out of nowhere. Also a lovely note to end on.
  20. A shot in the dark Solid. Nothing wrong with this one, it just didn't grab me as much as some others.
  21. 2:03 I liked it. The story had such a good rhythm it could almost have been written by blixco. I didn't care that it didn't make much sense because the protagonist was strong enough to tie it together, and I just enjoyed the ride. Coming back around to the beginning with the time felt like the rollercoaster car coming to a stop so you can get off and let the next group on.
  22. The Endless Wheel I liked the writing and would have liked the ending if it went with a different story. In this case, I felt like it didn't answer the question it raised (or I just didn't get it), so it felt incomplete.


--
"later" meant either "when you walk around the corner" or "oatmeal."
We should definitely do this again some time. by aphrael (4.00 / 3) #70 Sun May 14, 2006 at 07:27:08 PM EST
Also, in lieu of 256 updating with author identities, the authors could post them:

'The Endless Wheel' was mine.
If television is a babysitter, the internet is a drunk librarian who won't shut up.

Excellent work, sir! by yicky yacky (4.00 / 2) #71 Sun May 14, 2006 at 09:45:33 PM EST

Whilst mildly hazy at the time, I nevertheless feel reasonably certain that I wrote 'Bouncing ...'.


----
Vacuity abhors a vacuum.
[ Parent ]
You Got One of My Votes. by Christopher Robin was Murdered (4.00 / 1) #94 Mon May 15, 2006 at 07:47:14 AM EST
I really liked yours. I thought it was inventive and well-executed.

[ Parent ]
Thank you very much by yicky yacky (2.00 / 0) #95 Mon May 15, 2006 at 08:14:56 AM EST

The feeling was mutual, but the connotations implied by your story lost me towards the end. Terrific first two-thirds, though. I'm looking forward to your post mortem so that I can feel like an uncomprehending prat with clarity.


----
Vacuity abhors a vacuum.
[ Parent ]
The Final Third. by Christopher Robin was Murdered (2.00 / 0) #96 Mon May 15, 2006 at 08:21:22 AM EST
There were quite a few criticism of the end of the story. You were hardly alone. In retrospect, it is obviously the weakest part.

If I were ever to revisit the story, I'd give the ending a serious reworking, I think.

[ Parent ]
Do I have to own up? by DullTrev (4.00 / 3) #72 Mon May 15, 2006 at 12:46:25 AM EST

I wrote 'Diaspora', the stalk-fest that was 'Lord' and the piece of genius that was 'The Hill'.

You lot just don't appreciate a good pun...


--
DFJ?
[ Parent ]
blimey by TPD (4.00 / 1) #73 Mon May 15, 2006 at 12:52:21 AM EST
you got 2 of my 3 votes! And The Hill only narrowly missed the cut, good punning sir!

why sit, when you can sit and swivel with The Ab-SwivellerTM
[ Parent ]
Great Work. by Christopher Robin was Murdered (4.00 / 1) #82 Mon May 15, 2006 at 06:08:13 AM EST
I really dug your story. Best of the lot, in my opinion.

[ Parent ]
TPD = teh sucky righter by TPD (4.00 / 2) #74 Mon May 15, 2006 at 01:00:06 AM EST
George and the fairy = teh suck

it's left as an exercise for the reader to solve the equation!

Fun to have a go at though, and I'm more than happy to be HuSi's worst writer..... Great competition! Good entries all!

why sit, when you can sit and swivel with The Ab-SwivellerTM

[ Parent ]
agree by persimmon (4.00 / 3) #75 Mon May 15, 2006 at 05:33:30 AM EST
I did Songs of the Redeemed. I also don't write fiction much (or ever), which is my excuse for the large swaths of incoherence.
-----
"Nature is such a fucking plagarist."
[ Parent ]
I Wrote "Kelly" by Christopher Robin was Murdered (4.00 / 3) #76 Mon May 15, 2006 at 05:36:46 AM EST
There. I've admitted it.

[ Parent ]
Excellent work, sir. by Driusan (2.00 / 0) #98 Mon May 15, 2006 at 10:20:48 AM EST
If we follow the rules of the MFCs, that means your prize is: You get to organize the next WFC!..either that or theantix does, I'm not entirely sure.

--
Vive le Montréal libre.
[ Parent ]
I Think It Is Up to Theantix. by Christopher Robin was Murdered (4.00 / 1) #99 Mon May 15, 2006 at 10:22:27 AM EST
That'll teach him to not enter a contest!

[ Parent ]
depends. by aphrael (2.00 / 0) #100 Mon May 15, 2006 at 10:41:13 AM EST
it's not clear that he'll actually do it, and it would be a shame to not have another one. :)

i'll check in with him in irc on the subject next time i see him.

If television is a babysitter, the internet is a drunk librarian who won't shut up.

[ Parent ]
I'll Do It If He Doesn't. by Christopher Robin was Murdered (4.00 / 1) #101 Mon May 15, 2006 at 10:52:49 AM EST
As the, um, Vice Winner of the WFC is it my duty to assume the office of Winner in the unlikely and tragic event that the real Winner is incapable or unwilling to perform the duties of his office.

256 seems to have temporarily disappeared. Any advice on finding somebody to host the next shindig?

[ Parent ]
W00t! by ana (2.00 / 0) #102 Mon May 15, 2006 at 11:03:24 AM EST
I expect 256 will re-surface presently. Damned messenger bikes without internet access.

The anonymous thing worked out surprisingly well. We've had quite a bit of whining about both the word limit and the time limit, though 29 days seems like kind of a lot, to me. Personally, I wrote the story down in about 2 hours, though I thought about it for weeks.

Anyway, have at it. I even managed to talk hulver into upping the limit on poll options to accomodate our numbers. If there's anything I can do to help, do let me know.

I'm thinkin I might want to put together an actual book out of this stuff, though beyond LaTeXing everything, I'm not quite sure how. Include the blurb on the back cover? But of course. Post-mortems as appendix? Maybe so.

Can you introspect out loud? --CRwM

[ Parent ]
Just my two cents.... by randomxs (2.00 / 0) #103 Mon May 15, 2006 at 11:12:20 AM EST
I would like to see the word limit stay at 2000 words.

I would also like to see the time cut to 2 weeks instead of a month. That makes it a challenge.

"When a person can no longer laugh at himself, it is time for others to laugh at him." - Thomas Szasz

[ Parent ]
IAWTP. by Driusan (2.00 / 0) #104 Mon May 15, 2006 at 11:14:01 AM EST


--
Vive le Montréal libre.
[ Parent ]
i agree with both of those. by aphrael (2.00 / 0) #105 Mon May 15, 2006 at 12:20:13 PM EST
2000 words is a bit tight, and requires some editing, but it's possible to tell a story in that frame. If it does increase, it shouldn't go up to more than say 2500 or so.

Shortening the length of time would also be good; it might get fewer entries, but it would make it easier to move on to the next thing.
If television is a babysitter, the internet is a drunk librarian who won't shut up.

[ Parent ]
With the SSR books by cam (4.00 / 1) #106 Mon May 15, 2006 at 12:58:54 PM EST
I edited them in openoffice, exported to pdf and then uploaded to cafepress.

cam
Freedom, liberty, equity and an Australian Republic

[ Parent ]
I've been thinking by Kellnerin (4.00 / 2) #107 Mon May 15, 2006 at 02:00:47 PM EST
about making a real book object as well. After all, we do have a cover design. And I have wanted to play around with book design, just to see if I really can do better than some of the bozos whose designs I've seen. I just need the motivation to plunk down a large chunk of change for Quark. Then I will be unstoppable!

I think the parameters for this challenge were good for the first time round to get things going, but it would be dull if we didn't tweak them each time and try something new ...

--
"later" meant either "when you walk around the corner" or "oatmeal."

[ Parent ]
i have a draft by ana (2.00 / 0) #108 Mon May 15, 2006 at 02:07:55 PM EST
latex version of everything (well, the stories, not the blurb, and not the still-in-progress debriefs), if you'd like to start there. Thanks to janra's script, mostly.

Can you introspect out loud? --CRwM

[ Parent ]
heh by theantix (2.00 / 0) #110 Mon May 15, 2006 at 08:40:04 PM EST
I wouldn't mind doing it, but I think you actually deserve to.  This is to say that I'm not trying to dodge responsibility, just that I didn't actually earn it.  But if y'all feel that I should, I'll do the honour...

____________________________________
You sir, are worse than Hitler.
[ Parent ]
Either/Or Is So Restrictive by Christopher Robin was Murdered (2.00 / 0) #111 Tue May 16, 2006 at 04:58:41 AM EST
I entered just for the shits and giggles of writing a story and don't really have any particular jones to organize the next one. I've kicked some ideas around, but I don't know how good any of them are.

Do you have any clever ideas for the next one?

They say (oh, those ever chattering they) that two heads are better than one. Let's compare notes and just run with the concept we like best.

[ Parent ]
Collaborations... by ana (2.00 / 0) #112 Tue May 16, 2006 at 05:13:48 AM EST
are good. Kellnerin contributed rather significantly to this WFC's challenge. And of course 256's web engine and bandwidth made it all possible.

Can you introspect out loud? --CRwM

[ Parent ]
I didn't really ... by Kellnerin (2.00 / 0) #116 Tue May 16, 2006 at 12:01:49 PM EST
contribute much, beyond some musings about logistics and such. The theme was all yours as well as the presentation of the challenge itself, and thus all the credit (and of course any blame, but mostly credit in this case) belong to you.

--
"later" meant either "when you walk around the corner" or "oatmeal."
[ Parent ]
no, no clever ideas by theantix (2.00 / 0) #113 Tue May 16, 2006 at 09:32:34 AM EST
I'm going to have to warn you: I'm a sucker for post-apocalyptic worlds.  So I would suggest that any of the stories have to be set in a post-apocalyptic world, and somehow using the phase "the writing on the wall" either literally or metaphorically.

So I ask you: do you still want my input? 

____________________________________
You sir, are worse than Hitler.

[ Parent ]
I Think That Wins by Christopher Robin was Murdered (2.00 / 0) #114 Tue May 16, 2006 at 11:07:03 AM EST
Mine was that the you had incorporate the numbers 1 through 20 into your story somehow (each separate number, the number 1,234,567,891,011,121,314,151,617,181,920 wouldn't count).

I think the morning after stories would have more appeal.

[ Parent ]
additional thoughts by theantix (2.00 / 0) #115 Tue May 16, 2006 at 11:49:22 AM EST
it has to be set in the post-apocalpytic future, not during the apocalypse itself.  it's a small but important distiction.  entrants would be encouraged to be creative in the nature of the apocalypse, bonus marks for not having it be because president bush started a nuclear holocaust or something.  The stories don't have to be about the apocalypse at all, it's the setting not necessarily the plot.

____________________________________
You sir, are worse than Hitler.
[ Parent ]
Don't give too much away. by Christopher Robin was Murdered (2.00 / 0) #117 Tue May 16, 2006 at 12:02:18 PM EST
I can hear these cheating scriblers sharpening their pencils already.

I've asked 256 if he has any interest in hosting the contest again. If he's cool, we're golden. If not, we'll need to hunt around. Let's settle that, then we can post the theme and fix the deadline and such.

That said, I'm with you about the importance of it being set after the apocalpyse, not during. Though, can we remove "future" from it? I like the idea of somebody writing the story of what happened after an apocalpyse that befell the 15th century or something.

[ Parent ]
YES by theantix (2.00 / 0) #118 Tue May 16, 2006 at 12:27:28 PM EST
the word "future" is stricken from the record.

If 256 does not want to host the files, I could write up a script to manage the entries in a few minutes and host it on my server no problem.  But I suspect that he will have no problem with that at all.

Oh, and are you really attached to the idea that it's all super-anonymous etc?  The music folks always seem ok with having their names attached to projects non-anonymously, why the need for this in the writing contest?  If people still want to submit anonymously, that's fine of course, I just don't see why that should be the default and part of the contest to keep who wrote what a secret.  If you are attached to the idea though, it's cool with me.

____________________________________
You sir, are worse than Hitler.

[ Parent ]
256 Is In. by Christopher Robin was Murdered (2.00 / 0) #119 Tue May 16, 2006 at 12:31:11 PM EST
In his infinite wisdom and mercy, he agreed to host once again. He said it was no problem to do the hosting thing. He just wants us to let him know when we want it opened for business.

Shall we take our nafarious plotting over to private messages to settle on the details?

[ Parent ]
i think anonymity is better in this case. by aphrael (2.00 / 0) #120 Tue May 16, 2006 at 12:33:42 PM EST
it lets you weigh the stories without weighing your preconcieved notions about the author's writing ability.

If television is a babysitter, the internet is a drunk librarian who won't shut up.
[ Parent ]
how is that different from musical abilities? by theantix (2.00 / 0) #121 Tue May 16, 2006 at 12:47:46 PM EST
I'm not saying you are wrong, just wondering why writing is considered a special case when people can have preconcieved notions of musical abilities just like writing abilities.

____________________________________
You sir, are worse than Hitler.
[ Parent ]
We figured by ana (2.00 / 0) #122 Tue May 16, 2006 at 12:49:44 PM EST
it would be less a popularity contest and more about the stories themselves if it was anonymous. You, however, may do as you like.

Can you introspect out loud? --CRwM

[ Parent ]
i'd say the same thing for the mfc by aphrael (4.00 / 1) #123 Tue May 16, 2006 at 12:51:20 PM EST
but i have zero musical talent so don't play that game.
If television is a babysitter, the internet is a drunk librarian who won't shut up.
[ Parent ]
well, one difference by Kellnerin (2.00 / 0) #124 Tue May 16, 2006 at 01:54:31 PM EST
is that the main medium of interaction we have with each other through this site is via text. What impressions we have of these internet personalities are mostly formed through their written words. I think we are (or at least I am) more likely to have expectations for writing attached to a particular username that may have nothing to do with the qualities of the piece itself. As a reader, I liked coming to each story without any idea what I might get.

I also think some people may be more willing to submit stories anonymously (but then still take credit for having produced something), or some may like to experiment with styles different from what they usually do, and see how they go over without relying on their reputations.

I liked the anonymity-until-after-voting, but that's just one of the parameters (along with theme, word count, and time frame) that can be tweaked with each round.

--
"later" meant either "when you walk around the corner" or "oatmeal."

[ Parent ]
I think the element of anonymity by randomxs (2.00 / 0) #125 Tue May 16, 2006 at 07:42:53 PM EST
adds an element of fun that it otherwise would not have. Half the fun was reading all the ruses etc.

"When a person can no longer laugh at himself, it is time for others to laugh at him." - Thomas Szasz
[ Parent ]
anonymity by Merekat (2.00 / 0) #126 Tue May 30, 2006 at 12:51:38 AM EST
I wouldn't have written anything if the initial phase wasn't anonymous. I'm not sure why not though.

[ Parent ]
IAWTP by Kellnerin (4.00 / 4) #77 Mon May 15, 2006 at 05:47:38 AM EST
I hope theantix has a good challenge for us next time. Or if not tix, I guess it falls to CRwM. He would be good, too.

Anyway, now I can properly thank gazbo for ungarbling my story, 'cause "20th-Century House" was mine. For this heroic deed I reckon at least half my votes should go to him instead, whether he entered or not.

--
"later" meant either "when you walk around the corner" or "oatmeal."

[ Parent ]
Ed's Dead. by blixco (4.00 / 3) #78 Mon May 15, 2006 at 05:55:29 AM EST
I'm interested mostly in everyone thinking that it had a moral.  That last line means: to a small girl, her father's killer being killed doesn't equal a father.  She's obviously at peace once the killer has been killed, since she then sleeps.

Hrm.  I may have to take that story apart in a diary.  I was surprised at the critiques.  Good stuff, though, all around.
---------------------------------
Taken out of context I must seem so strange - Ani DiFranco

[ Parent ]
post-mortem by Kellnerin (4.00 / 3) #80 Mon May 15, 2006 at 06:00:41 AM EST
do one. My own entry's been tumbling around inside my head for the past week as well, and I may have to spew a bunch of those thoughts into a New Diary Entry form, and wouldn't want to be the only one.

--
"later" meant either "when you walk around the corner" or "oatmeal."
[ Parent ]
I'll Post-Mortem Mine as Well. by Christopher Robin was Murdered (4.00 / 2) #83 Mon May 15, 2006 at 06:10:12 AM EST
So don't worry about being alone with the self-analysis. I'm curious to see what everybody says about their stories.

[ Parent ]
As I admitted elsewhere... by ana (4.00 / 3) #81 Mon May 15, 2006 at 06:04:58 AM EST
I wrote You're not Ed Hulver.

Can you introspect out loud? --CRwM

[ Parent ]
Mine was "2:03" by toxicfur (4.00 / 2) #84 Mon May 15, 2006 at 06:15:25 AM EST
I threw it together in an hour or so during the Sunday writing chat. I kind of like the character, so I'm thinking of actually trying to create something real out of it. I get a bit overwhelmed when I try to figure out what the hell's going on in the story, though.
--
I've got more than one membership to more than one club, and I owe my life to the people that I love. - Ani DiFranco
[ Parent ]
Me by ucblockhead (4.00 / 2) #85 Mon May 15, 2006 at 06:21:34 AM EST
I wrote "How The Little One's Died"...apparently the least popular story. :-(
---
[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
[ Parent ]
That's joint least popular! by TPD (4.00 / 1) #87 Mon May 15, 2006 at 06:35:31 AM EST
please don't rob me of my shared moment of non glory!

why sit, when you can sit and swivel with The Ab-SwivellerTM
[ Parent ]
I did the one with the craptastic ending by cam (4.00 / 2) #88 Mon May 15, 2006 at 06:59:23 AM EST
Ed Lives. I am glad my drawing attention to its lack of votes got it off the 0% marker :)

cam
Freedom, liberty, equity and an Australian Republic

[ Parent ]
zit story<=randomxs (nt) by randomxs (4.00 / 2) #79 Mon May 15, 2006 at 06:00:12 AM EST


"When a person can no longer laugh at himself, it is time for others to laugh at him." - Thomas Szasz
Don't make me read them all again by hulver (2.00 / 0) #89 Mon May 15, 2006 at 07:10:24 AM EST
Which one was that?
--
Cheese is not a hat. - clock
[ Parent ]
The Mirrored Menagerie Of Adventurous Pixilates by randomxs (2.00 / 0) #90 Mon May 15, 2006 at 07:12:20 AM EST


"When a person can no longer laugh at himself, it is time for others to laugh at him." - Thomas Szasz
[ Parent ]
Ta! by hulver (4.00 / 1) #91 Mon May 15, 2006 at 07:14:11 AM EST

--
Cheese is not a hat. - clock
[ Parent ]
posting post-mortem and post toasties: Zit Story by randomxs (4.00 / 1) #86 Mon May 15, 2006 at 06:35:06 AM EST
I edited mine about three times after writing it. I figured it would not get any votes at all and almost didn't submit, but that is just how I am and I never know. I thought many of the entries were excellent and it was fun

The plot occurred to me almost immediately upon reading the guidelines.

I was in an altered state of consciousnes.

The alignment of the stars was outta whack.

I checked tea leaves and used yarrow sticks with I Ching.

Fed my datura plant.

Leveled my desk because I THOUGHT it was eskewed.

Stood on my head because I was sure blood had drained from it.

Wore my Tin Foil Aluminum Hat for several days and even slept in it.

I read Nostradamus and saw the prediction of the Writing Contest in the book.

Shaved WarKat.

Shaved her....um nevermind.

Gave money to Indians on the bridge going to Juarez.

Talked to a number of Pixilates and interviewed one of their gang members.


"When a person can no longer laugh at himself, it is time for others to laugh at him." - Thomas Szasz

I Admire a Writer Who Does His Research. n/t by Christopher Robin was Murdered (4.00 / 1) #93 Mon May 15, 2006 at 07:44:33 AM EST


[ Parent ]
I wrote a shot in the dark by georgeha (4.00 / 4) #92 Mon May 15, 2006 at 07:27:02 AM EST
I don't like the title, but I can sure understand foot pain and insanity.


Great film! Peter Sellers was boffo! by Ignore Amos (2.00 / 0) #109 Mon May 15, 2006 at 03:29:36 PM EST


[ Parent ]
Thank for your work! by gadinghot (2.00 / 0) #127 Wed Oct 11, 2006 at 10:55:46 AM EST
Hello! Found lots of entertaining posts at this website. Read most of the archive. Thank for your work!

VOTE, dammit. RIGHT NOW! | 127 comments (127 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback