Print Story Finally
Diary
By DesiredUsername (Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 03:35:19 AM EST) (all tags)
Also, two questions about what you humans call "the internet".


  • We finally finished the still. Money shots for those that can't get to port 8000:




  • I'd like to move to a webhost so I can get a real port number, but I have a non-traditional requirement: My wife doesn't want to break links that currently point to :8000. Are there any webhosts out there that will let you host on 80 and 8000 both, at least for some amount of time? B-i-L just went with webhostingbuzz.com and they do indeed seem to have a pretty sweet deal. But what of port numbers?

  • Also, what about domain registrars? I assume Register.com is the most expensive--what's better? GoDaddy?

  • Work suddenly took a turn for the busy. I was sitting there, minding my own 3D graphing business, when out of the blue...we have new data to insert! Oh and we also have MORE new data in a totally fresh format! PS: Here's a bug! And another one! And a third and fourth! Also, could you come to this meeting, kthx? So my stack is pushed down several layers and I'll have to spend a week popping to get back to what I'd like to be doing. MY LIFE IS A NIGHTMARE

  • I wasn't even thinking of the still project when I googled for E85 to see what it was. It's crazy. Like, you can basically put ethanol, even "only" 180 proof, right into a gas engine and it will run without modification. (Possibly not well or for long, but it will run.) Relatively minor modifications make it just as efficient (on a volume->distance metric) as gas. ObWTFWhyAren'tWeDoingThat.

< I stink | BBC White season: 'Rivers of Blood' >
Finally | 67 comments (67 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
E85 by LilFlightTest (2.00 / 0) #1 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 03:49:47 AM EST
dont put it in a car that isnt meant for it. newer cars can run either, the car knows what's in it and adjusts accordingly. you might only have a problem if it's half and half, and even then it'd probably just get crap gas mileage for that tank.
Send me to Austria!
Yes and no by DesiredUsername (2.00 / 0) #10 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 04:25:37 AM EST
It isn't "newer cars", it's Flexible Fuel Vehicles that can figure it out. But even some non-FFVs should (AFAICT) be fine, because they allow E10, which is just the "gasohol" that almost everyone uses. The real problem would be much older cars that still have fuel lines and such that ethanol would dissolve.

As for mileage, my understanding is that pure ethanol in a regular, non-FFV gas engine is somewhat worse per gallon but better per dollar, which is really what matters.

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[ Parent ]
Go Daddy is the cheap by Bob Abooey (2.00 / 0) #2 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 03:49:50 AM EST
My only gripe is their logging stuff is the suck unless you pony up for the deluxe logging stats feature which is like twice as much as the hosting, or something like that. If you just want it for basic home-use-screwing-around I think it's one of the better deals out there.

Warmest regards,
--Your best pal Bob

webhostingbuzz has some great features by DesiredUsername (2.00 / 0) #9 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 04:22:56 AM EST
and it's only $3/mo. But they don't support port 8000.

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[ Parent ]
Oh yeah by Bob Abooey (2.00 / 0) #3 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 03:51:22 AM EST
And mad props for having a better looking stove than that sasquatch bloke. I assume the misses picked it out?

Warmest regards,
--Your best pal Bob

I used to think DU was a gourmand by georgeha (4.00 / 1) #4 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 03:58:25 AM EST
but he has an electric stove. Great for safely distilling alcohol, not so great for simmering, slow boiling and other tricky cooking techniques.


[ Parent ]
I missed that by Bob Abooey (2.00 / 0) #5 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 04:01:54 AM EST
You're right. Gas is the only way to go wrt cooking.

Maybe they got the stove from the still-good-shed, you know, you can't be too picky wrt still-good-shed.

Warmest regards,
--Your best pal Bob

[ Parent ]
I am not a gourmand--I only eat tacos and pizza. by DesiredUsername (4.00 / 1) #13 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 04:38:41 AM EST
I'm also not a gourmet--I only cook tacos and pizza.

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[ Parent ]
Wrong, you sexist (nt) by DesiredUsername (2.00 / 0) #11 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 04:25:59 AM EST


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Ya know, by sasquatchan (2.00 / 0) #25 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:13:29 AM EST
I had to check, as best I can tell, there's no view of the range-top in any of our pictures. Lots of counter tops, and living room colors, which you did carp on, but not the range top. Nuhuh, no sir.

[ Parent ]
Waaaaaa??? by Bob Abooey (2.00 / 0) #41 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:41:50 AM EST
Well, that may be the case, but you can't deny that if you had posted a picture of your stove it would have been the wrong colour.

Warmest regards,
--Your best pal Bob

[ Parent ]
hahah by sasquatchan (2.00 / 0) #48 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:48:45 AM EST
well, granted. The Mrs would agree with you there.

There's 2-3 major expenditure projects in the works (ie semi-funded, no time line).

  • New couches for the living room (got the chair and a half, need new loveseat and couch) pretty much fully funded.
  • New counter tops. No funding, but could work it out. We'd probably do it ourselves in conjunction with
  • New stove/range top, with a second oven somewhere in the kitchen. Want a gas rangetop, and prolly 'lectric oven. There's some dual-fuel oven/rangetops, just not many, and pricey. Semi-funded. Have a friend we'd hire to run the gas line (about 8 feet) and install a new breaker for the new oven.


[ Parent ]
Sounds like fun by Bob Abooey (2.00 / 0) #50 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:59:49 AM EST
I'm looking forward to the photo-documentary.

Still, the first thing I'd do is slop some "right coloured" paint on the living room walls, but that's just me.

Warmest regards,
--Your best pal Bob

[ Parent ]
it's a very soothing color by sasquatchan (2.00 / 0) #53 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 06:06:30 AM EST
I tell ya. Though the Mrs picked it out, she's not entirely thrilled with it. I like it because it's white during the day, and a warm yellow at night with the lights on.

We painted the entire house when we moved in. Many walls were contractor beige (yuk) or a dark mouldy green. The hallways were, below the chair rail, solid pink, above the chair rail, hand-done sponge pink, over a white/beige base. That shit got painted over right quick.

[ Parent ]
I'm really hoping, by blixco (4.00 / 2) #6 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 04:14:56 AM EST
I mean, it's one of those "I really really want this" hopes, that we start moving swiftly toward E85 and biodiesel.  Gives our farmers something to do besides get subsidies...and no more subsidies means more $$ for whatever...plus we get off the dicks of our Saudi "friends" and their "friends" and the list of people we have to kill would get smaller.

I mean, why the hell not?  It would be good for everything!  There isn't a down side!
---------------------------------
Taken out of context I must seem so strange - Ani DiFranco

The subsidy $$$ by cam (4.00 / 2) #7 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 04:16:57 AM EST
are nearly equal to the Australian GDP. Despite them being an abomination, they will be hard to remove.

cam
Freedom, liberty, equity and an Australian Republic

[ Parent ]
True. by blixco (4.00 / 2) #12 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 04:30:54 AM EST
But we could at least start to ween them off.
---------------------------------
Taken out of context I must seem so strange - Ani DiFranco
[ Parent ]
IAWTP, it seems like a no-brainer by DesiredUsername (4.00 / 1) #22 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:07:10 AM EST
Ethanol production is apparently growing pretty big, so maybe we'll see it. No pumps in New England, ObDamnLiberalsScrewingTheAmericanFarmer, but since my a) older b) Toyotae won't use E85 anyway it doesn't matter.

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I noticed by blixco (2.00 / 0) #23 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:10:04 AM EST
that it was GM and Ford what had the greatest number of E85 vehicles.  While a lot of this is due to lower compression old-iron motors, they should be able to use it (and have started) as a successful ad campaign.  Might be just the thing to start turning the tide for them both.

Though I doubt it seriously.  But I hold out hope.  I'd hate to see a Chinese company buy the remains of General Motors.  No good reason, I'm just picky about which repressive regime I buy from.
---------------------------------
Taken out of context I must seem so strange - Ani DiFranco

[ Parent ]
I think that's how I came across E85 by DesiredUsername (4.00 / 1) #26 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:15:11 AM EST
I've been peripherally aware of it, but to the extent I noticed it at all I assumed the "85" was a marketing trick and that it was only 15% ethanol. But then the Tahoe dissin' started last week and someone pointed out that the Tahoe is a FFV, so really we should be praising it. And I'm all wha and then I turn to the internet and that brings us up to right now.

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Look at Mexico and Brazil by sasquatchan (4.00 / 2) #32 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:26:44 AM EST
two countries that I believe have a large number of ethanol fueled vehicles. Brazil because of their huge excess sugar cane crop (because of US import duties on sugar, to protect those idiots in Florida that are destroying the everglades) has plenty of free sugar, and for environmental reasons.

Mexico I think because of clean air issues (eg Mexico City).

[ Parent ]
Oh that's right by DesiredUsername (2.00 / 0) #34 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:30:03 AM EST
I guess Brazil is like totally converted to ethanol. OTOH...Brazil.

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[ Parent ]
cool project results by tps12 (2.00 / 0) #8 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 04:17:15 AM EST
And nice glassware. Any idea what kind of proof you ended up with? I was a little disappointed with my still's output after a single distillation, but I didn't have the kind of temperature control you did. Also,, I think you forgot the step where you use your great grandfather's recipe and age it in oak for twenty years.

No by DesiredUsername (2.00 / 0) #14 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 04:39:47 AM EST
I'm thinking of buying a hydrometer so I can check that, but I'd also need sufficient volume to test.

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Can't you check mass and density of the mead by georgeha (2.00 / 0) #17 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 04:58:05 AM EST
before and after distilling, and figure it out from there?


[ Parent ]
I can check the volume fairly well by DesiredUsername (2.00 / 0) #18 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 04:59:43 AM EST
the mass is harder--the most precise scale I have is a postal one. What's the density difference between ethanol and water, is it enough to add up to an ounce in under 50 ml?

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[ Parent ]
Digital kitchen scales by ad hoc (4.00 / 1) #29 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:21:36 AM EST
That would be sweet by DesiredUsername (4.00 / 1) #31 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:25:45 AM EST
Thanks for the tip, I had no idea kitchen scales were that cheap and accurate.

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Just pay cash and wear a disguise by georgeha (4.00 / 2) #35 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:30:55 AM EST
so the DEA doesn't think you're some sort of drug lord.


[ Parent ]
Scales by ad hoc (4.00 / 1) #43 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:46:05 AM EST
I have this one. I think it was $21 at Bed Bath & Beyond. Make sure you get one with a tare feature. I think all of them measure in oz/gm.
--
Close friendships and a private room can offer most of the things love does.
[ Parent ]
s/accurate/precise/ (nt) by tps12 (4.00 / 1) #67 Mon Apr 17, 2006 at 02:55:26 AM EST


[ Parent ]
really? by 256 (2.00 / 0) #61 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 12:02:52 PM EST
i always just ran a taste-test for determining alcohol content of my home-distilled beveragesfuels
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I don't think anyone's ever really died from smoking. --ni
[ Parent ]
Illegal and dangerous by DesiredUsername (2.00 / 0) #62 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 02:15:26 PM EST
Also, I hate the taste of alcohol.

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Pop quiz by Rogerborg (2.00 / 0) #15 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 04:47:59 AM EST
We're currently burning through the totality of hundreds of millions of years worth of stored organic fuels, and are already on the downslope.  Can we seriously replace that with a bunch of burn-it-as-it-grows hemp oil or whatever the Big Thing is this week?  Yes or no?

-
Metus amatores matrum compescit, non clementia.
Some of, yes by DesiredUsername (4.00 / 1) #16 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 04:51:19 AM EST
You (or I, anyway) already have ethanol in your (my) gas tank. It's already working. Just turn up the volume.

My understanding is that we aren't making enough ethanol to totally replace the gas we're using, but I don't see why there has to be One Big Solution. Hybrids + ethanol, for instance, are a pretty good combination that gets us maybe 50% of the way. Then if the US bombs the crap out of Europe, that'll cut back on world gas usage maybe 10%. It all adds up.

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[ Parent ]
Ethanol produces less power/cc than gasoline by wiredog (2.00 / 0) #19 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 04:59:51 AM EST
So you need to burn more of it to get the same result, in speed, towing capacity, etc. That, IIRC, is the source of the problem with running it in cars not designed for it. Again IIRC, if you put jets that are 50% larger in the carb you can use ethanol just fine. Not sure what you do with fuel injection cars.

Earth First!
(We can strip mine the rest later.)

Computers. by blixco (2.00 / 0) #20 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:03:25 AM EST
Though it might take larger injectors / high volume rail and a higher volume fuel pump, the computer can typically change the flow rate and timing for the fuel you're using.  That seems to be how GM and Ford are doing it.
---------------------------------
Taken out of context I must seem so strange - Ani DiFranco
[ Parent ]
Some less by DesiredUsername (2.00 / 0) #21 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:04:59 AM EST
but unless you were maxing out your power output, I doubt you'd notice. You would see a difference in mileage, but again if it's cheaper then that's really all you care about.

I guess there are replacement chips even for non-FFV cars to adjust the fuel injection if you needed to do that.

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Domain registrar by ad hoc (2.00 / 0) #24 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:10:35 AM EST
If you use MyDomain.com (a division of Dotster) you get free DNS management with it which can solve your :8000 issue.
--
Close friendships and a private room can offer most of the things love does.
I keep thinking this too by DesiredUsername (2.00 / 0) #27 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:15:40 AM EST
but how will DNS solve the :8000 issue?

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IIRC by ad hoc (2.00 / 0) #40 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:41:06 AM EST
You can use their "forwarding" features to forward domain.com:8080 to domain.com:80

but it's been a long time since I did that and I don't recall very clearly.

You could probably also use .htaccess in some way, but I'd have to look that up too.
--
Close friendships and a private room can offer most of the things love does.

[ Parent ]
.htaccess by gazbo (2.00 / 0) #42 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:45:45 AM EST
Highly doubtful - if Apache's not listening to that port at startup then there's nothing that can be done at the .htaccess level.

I recommend always assuming 7th normal form where items in a text column are not allowed to rhyme.

[ Parent ]
Good point. by ad hoc (2.00 / 0) #46 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:47:35 AM EST
I always forget that since I do have access to all that stuff.

OTOH, 8000 and 8080 are pretty common, so maybe he can get lucky.
--
Close friendships and a private room can offer most of the things love does.

[ Parent ]
If so, this would be perfect by DesiredUsername (2.00 / 0) #45 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:47:04 AM EST
I'll look into it. Kthx the Second.

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[ Parent ]
Read the car manual by sasquatchan (2.00 / 0) #28 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:16:44 AM EST
for whether your car takes it or not. My pimp mobile's manual explicitly says e85 is a nono. Something about corrode this or that and gunk in the engine. But it's an old car.

And as Cam pointed out, gov't subsidies barely bring the price down to compete with gasoline.

Ignoring the "green" impact of it, or bio-diesel, how are the plants grown ? 2nd law of thermo doesn't enter, since the sun is part of the energy, but fertilizer, transport, tractors, heat/juice for the distillation or whatnot are all petro fueled. If you can't break even (ignoring the  gov't $$ going in), what the reason ?

More than even by DesiredUsername (2.00 / 0) #30 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:24:08 AM EST
But why do you assume the farm itself is using petroleum?

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True, true by sasquatchan (2.00 / 0) #36 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:32:51 AM EST
once up and running (eg getting past the first harvest/distill round), can the farm be self-sustaining and produce a non-trivial excess that could meet local demands ?

I'll ignore transportation costs, fertilizer, pesticides/fungicide/weedkiller stuff (all petro based), and be interested in the answer. I don't really know, and am just midly pessimistic that it would come out ahead.

[ Parent ]
The energy in a gallon of ethanol by DesiredUsername (2.00 / 0) #39 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:41:00 AM EST
is roughly equivalent to that in a gallon of gas. And keep in mind that you only get to use a small fraction of the energy in a gallon of gas what with engine inefficiencies, etc, some of which ethanol can alleviate (something about burning slower and more evenly).

Now compare the costs: Is it really a bigger cost to maintain a farm than an oilfield? Especially if the former can simultaneously produce food (the discards from the still are still usable as feed corn) and the latter requires periodic wars?

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need to corner a gym friend by sasquatchan (2.00 / 0) #52 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 06:03:33 AM EST
who is an engineer on making ethanol plants.. Granted, he just knows how to take corn and make ethanol in high volumes. Unsure if he knows about the costs, subisdies, and where/how the corn is grown.

If it can be self-sustained, I'd be very interested.

I don't disagree with the "even if it isn't, if it'll cut our use by some percentage it's a good thing", but self-sustainiable I think would be a better goal.

By self-sustain, I mean, work with out large subsidies (right now, the corn grower gets the subsidies and guaranted crop prices, the ethanol plant gets tax credits/breaks, the car markers get tax breaks, etc), AND the farm/plant have severely reduced need for external inputs to grow the plants and make the fuel (or be able to sell enough product to more than cover the costs of buying external inputs)

[ Parent ]
For (soya) biodiesel, by ambrosen (2.00 / 0) #33 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:28:42 AM EST
there's an 83% energy yield, the same as petro diesel.

It's lower for non leguminous oil sources, though. Which is a problem for e.g. UK sourced oils.

[ Parent ]
yah, but biodiesel can be made from meat by lm (2.00 / 0) #47 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:47:47 AM EST
Just think of the health benefits if the UK started processing all its excess meat fat into biodiesel rather than deep-frying twinkies. Scotchlandia alone could probably cover half of the fuel needs of half of Her Majesty's Empire by recylicing its fryer grease.

OTOH, you can still covert the grease into biodiesel after using it to deep fry. So maybe there wouldn't be any health benefits.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
Another point is that is grown by commercial by cam (2.00 / 0) #37 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:34:49 AM EST
monoculture. Which has a whole raft of problems associated with it too.

cam
Freedom, liberty, equity and an Australian Republic

[ Parent ]
still temps by sasquatchan (2.00 / 0) #38 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:37:07 AM EST
(sorry for commenting so much in your diary)..

You said last time you had trouble maintaining a high enough temp in the water bath to get much distillate. And said something about getting boiling chips. (I recall in chem days we had a nice electric mantle to wrap the flask in to warm it, plus the sillicon chips, not out of an old x86 ;)

So how'd you address those problems ? And how'd the PVC hold up in the heat/steam ? And seepage from joints where glue dissolved in the alcohol or what not ? How big of a yield ? (Assuming the first picture was the starter, not the end product).

Would you improve on your design ? (eg, I thought you'd use a T connector at the first joint instead of a 90 elbow. That way, you could drop a thermometer into the column to monitor the steam temp coming up the column)

This is all addressed....oh by DesiredUsername (2.00 / 0) #44 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:46:13 AM EST
You probably can't get to the site.

PVC: Held up fine. The first batch especially was kind of smelly and yuck, but I think that was mainly some bits and pieces of the stopper that fell in. Still, I'm sure there was some contamination and I would highly recommend that you not drink this stuff, even if it were legal. Zero seepage, even from where the head thermometer is inserted (sealed with some clay).

Water bath: Replaced with vegetable oil. Worked beautifully because it not only transmitted the heat better but also kept it from fluctuating.

Boiling chip: A bit of cement.

Yield: Something like 30-40 ml, I think.

Improvements: Would a T connector let the steam escape? I think my first improvement would be to angle the pipe down after the head--I just couldn't find an elbow that was less than 90°. After that, some kind of thermostat setup. But if I were to actually do this again, I think I'd get serious.

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[ Parent ]
T-connector by sasquatchan (2.00 / 0) #49 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 05:53:29 AM EST
Usually the thermometer is stuck through a stopper that has a hole in it. The stopper than keeps everything in the column. Also, the horizontal piece would have a water jacket on it, and be connected a bit lower down the column, so if steam rose up to the stopper with the thermometer, you're running it too high (ie a good check/balance). You'd use the therm to sample the column temp, and maintain correct distill temps and have an idea of when the distillate started getting too much water in it.

Of course, that's all with glass, where you can see wtf is happening (eg watch the condensation ring rise up the column). Opaque PVC makes it a bit harder.

[ Parent ]
If current trends hold, the market will work by lm (4.00 / 1) #51 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 06:01:42 AM EST
While I think that the free market fails in a lot of ways, I think that alternative fuels is one place where the free market will work. Most alternatives to petrofuels become competitive with oil once the price of oil is somewhere between sixty and a hundred USD per barrel. For example, a new plant just came online that turns waste animal renderings (anything from feathers and bones to fats and hides) puts out biodiesel (ready to burn) at a hundred USD per barrel. It also solves another problem what to do with biological waste.

I think the biggest problem will be keeping the government out of the picture. Because if the current method of US government intervention continues, then subsidies will be given to the crops that are most profitable for farmers to grow rather than the best crops for producing biofuels. Short of a massive shake up in lobbying regulations, I only see more idiocy ahead on government intervention.

If the government is going to get involved, IMO, the best thing to do would be forced reclamation of waste. If I understand how the process works correctly, pretty much any organic waste can be made into biodiesel with less energy than one gets from burning the product. A government mandate to separate out organic form inorganic waste and subidies to sewage treatment might go a long way in the right direction.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
Many unanswered questions by ad hoc (4.00 / 1) #54 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 06:27:21 AM EST
Fertilizers, insecticides and herbicides are often petrochemicals. When and if ethanol becomes profitable on a large scale, I wonder what's going to happen with GM modified crops geared for fuel. Biofuels are not entirely harmless.
--
Close friendships and a private room can offer most of the things love does.
[ Parent ]
I concur by lm (2.00 / 0) #58 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 07:34:26 AM EST
Which is part of why I hope (but doubt) that the government advocates reclaming waste before growing crops for fuel. It's one of those things that just makes sense.

There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
Stills And Web hosting by Improbus (2.00 / 0) #55 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 06:30:11 AM EST
  1. Is it safe to use PVC when you are working with high temperature materials?  I think I would have used a glass condenser.
  2. Domain registrars.  I use GoDaddy for purchasing domains.  I use ZoneEdit.com (free) for DNS. I host my websites on my home web/ftp/mail server.




If you immediately know the candlelight is fire, the meal was cooked a long time ago. --- Oma Desala
Responses by DesiredUsername (2.00 / 0) #56 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 06:40:29 AM EST
  1. Well, I didn't die. The temperatures I was using are beyond the rating but, I have to believe, within the safety margin. I actually used CPVC if that makes any difference. My condenser is glass...
  2. Sounds good. ...Wait a minute--if I don't get a static IP from my webhost and manage DNS myself...how am I notified when the IP changes?


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[ Parent ]
I guess that doesn't work by DesiredUsername (2.00 / 0) #57 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 07:11:07 AM EST
You have to have the webhost manage DNS.

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[ Parent ]
Here Are Some Links For The Static IP Challenged by Improbus (2.00 / 0) #59 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 07:34:30 AM EST
DynDNS
No-IP
Dynamic DNS Providers



If you immediately know the candlelight is fire, the meal was cooked a long time ago. --- Oma Desala
[ Parent ]
Stills by Herring (2.00 / 0) #60 Thu Apr 06, 2006 at 09:18:51 AM EST
When younger, I made one. I improvised a leipzig (sp?) condenser using two different diameters of metal tube and some heat-shrink sleeving. Plus some plastic pipes for the cooling water. My aim was drink though, not fuel. Saying that, if you spat a mouthfull of the stuff onto a fire, the results were ... impressive.

For drinking you have to be a bit more careful. First runnings tend to be lighter stuff like methanol. Final output tends to be stuff like aldehydes. Neither of them very good for you.

christ, we're all old now - StackyMcRacky

What would the E85 be made from? by riceowlguy (2.00 / 0) #63 Fri Apr 07, 2006 at 08:33:25 AM EST
Corn?  95% of what goes into making corn is petroleum.  All the fertilizer comes from natural gas.  It's not going to help our overall non-renewable energy source consumption rates at all.

That makes no sense by DesiredUsername (2.00 / 0) #64 Fri Apr 07, 2006 at 08:41:06 AM EST
95% of what goes into making gas is petroleum too. You have to do work to make the fuel from raw ingredia, that's a given. The question is, is the fuel you make polluting or non-renewable.

If we use non-renewable sources to make more non-renewable fuel, we are using it up at twice the rate (more, actually) as if we use non-renewable soures to make renewable fuel. And that's ignoring the fact that you can use ethanol to power the tractors and other equipment to grow and process the corn (assuming you even use corn--as Im said waste products like wood chips are an even better place to start).

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[ Parent ]
Q: by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #65 Sat Apr 08, 2006 at 04:17:53 PM EST
How is it that your wife is aware of Port Numbers?

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

Nerd pillow talk by DesiredUsername (4.00 / 2) #66 Sat Apr 08, 2006 at 04:19:45 PM EST
You'd be amazed at how this increases the post-coital cuddling signal-to-noise ratio.

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