Print Story Smells like... victory
Diary
By TheophileEscargot (Fri Mar 31, 2006 at 09:38:45 PM EST) Watching, Reading, Me, MLP, OBLF (all tags)
Watching. Reading. Movie colour ratings so far. TMI. Web. OBLF. Poll.


What I'm Watching
Saw Cuban missile crisis movie Thirteen Days Pretty good, quite tense, pitched at a reasonable level where you didn't need a lot of knowledge. Seemed fairly informative to me, though I know very little about it and I'm told some people have complained about a lack of historical accuracy. Got a bit too cheesy with the music especially. Rating #9A90AB.

Also saw high-concept real-time thriller Phone Booth, where a guy is trapped in a phone booth by a maniac sniper. Not bad: Colin Farrell melts down effectively under pressure. Forest Whitaker is a bit wasted as his character doesn't really get developed or do much. Pretty good for the most part, but falls apart towards the end with excessive sentimentality and the saccharine nature of the central characters. Would have been much more effective if he had at least cheated on his wife, or done something worse, but I felt vaguely cheated after waiting for a shocking revelation that never came. Also at bit weakened by the unrelenting supportiveness of both wife and would-be-girlfriend: again would have been better if they'd had something to get angry about.. I give it #B0A860

Movie colour ratings so far
Thirteen Days: #9A90AB
Phone Booth: #B0A860
Stealth: #C80520
The Dukes of Hazzard: #281008
Bubba Ho-Tep: #B0C098
V for Vendetta: #BDA8B0
2046: #14D0B0
The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance: #CBA4C0
Tim Burton's Corpse Bride: #A0A89B
Secrets and Lies: #90A0D0
A Night at the Opera: #A8809B
Bringing Up Baby: #9070A0
About a Boy: #906870

Key: Red=Entertainment,Green=Originality,Blue=Intelligence.

TMI department
Dammit, the athlete's foot is back. Thought I'd got rid of it last year. Must have been hiding dormant in the cold of winter, since I don't go to gyms or swimming pools, there's not really anywhere I could pick up a new infection from.

Strangely, when I went to Boots it turned out they had a 3 for the price of 2 deal on athlete's foot treatments. Not sure why they do that. I would have thought either need to treat it or you don't. Maybe there are people around who think "Ooh, 3 for 2: I should contract it."

Web
Should the US press abandon Objectivity?

Different angle on the 3rd world PC: instead of making it small and cheap; making it big, robust and aimed at communities not individuals. Jaagruti press release; Register article.

Operation Become Less Fat
CW: 12st 6
SW: 14st 4
Loss: 26 pounds
Weeks: 17
Loss per week: 1.5 pounds

Two milestones this week. On the 5BX plan I reached the maximum recommended level for my age (Chart 4, Level C-). In theory, I'm now entitled to settle back to doing it three times a week to maintain my existing level of fitness. In practice I think my form's a bit bad, so I'll keep doing it daily for a bit. Not sure whether to stick at this, try to progress further, or maybe do the permitted running alternative to the last exercise. I could then increase the duration to longer than the 11 minutes.

Even better, my BMI is now 24.966, which finally takes me past the magic 25 barrier, out of the Overweight category and into the Normal category. Technically speaking I am no longer fat, though it's probably fortunate that the World Health Organization has no official Chubby category.

To celebrate my great achievements in the field of health, bought a packet of cigarettes.

Saturday 25 Mar 2006
Breakfast: 1 tea. Heinz Lamb and Vegetable Big Soup (234 kcal, 11.2g protein). 2 slices toast, tiny piece cheese.
Supper: 254g swordfish steak (279kcal, 46g protein), 300g potatoes, carrots, leeks. M&S "Count on Us" Chocolate Overload (174kcal,5.5g protein)
Second supper: 2 small ham and tomato sandwiches
Booze: 1 beer, 1 whisky
Exercise: 5BX Chart 4 Level D, Dumb-bells: light 5.5kg 3x10, heavy 13.5kg 3x10

Sunday 26 Mar 2006
Breakfast: 2 coffee, 2 boiled eggs, 3 slices bread, tomato, slice ham.
Lunch: 2 chicken burgers (300kcal, 16.2g protein), 200g potatoes, tin sweetcorn (127kcal,4g protein), M&S "count on us" choc coffee dessert (155)
Supper: Beef broth (170kcal) 2 slices toast
Snacks: 1 hot choc, 1 slice ham
Booze: 2.5 whisky
Exercise: 5BX Chart 4 Level D,

Monday 27 Mar 2006
Breakfast: 2 coffee.
Brunch: small egg, sausage, bacon sandwich
Supper: 2 Tesco beef grillsteaks (354kcal,22g protein), 350g potatoes (7g protein) with little butter, baked beans, egg (70kcal,6g protein). M&S "Count on Us" strawberry trifle (170kcal,4g)
Second supper: two very small slices toast, tin sardines (158kcal,19.2g protein)
Booze: 1 beer, 1 whisky
Exercise: 5BX Chart 4 Level D. 1.75 miles walking. Dumb-bells: light 5.5kg 3x10, heavy 13.5kg 3x10

Tuesday 28 Mar 2006
Breakfast: 2 coffee.
Brunch: Smoked salmon and cream cheese bagel
Lunch: Chicken pasty
Supper: 150g pasta, Campbell's meatballs, 35g cheese. WW Double Chocolate Brownies (146kcal,4.3g protein)
Snacks: 1 orange, 1 M&S "Count on us" crisps (90kcal)
Booze: 1 beer, 1 whisky
Exercise: 5BX Chart 4 Level D+. 3.5 miles walking.

Wednesday 29 Mar 2006
Breakfast: 2 coffee, Frosties and semi-skimmed milk.
Brunch: Small BLT roll
Supper: M&S "Count on Us" braised steak/carrots/onion (360kcal,50.8g), 120g bread (319kcal,9.6g). Milky Bar (68kcal).
Booze: 2 whisky
Snacks: orange
Exercise: 5BX Chart 4 Level D+. 3.5 miles walking. Dumb-bells: light 5.5kg 3x10, heavy 13.5kg 3x10

Thursday 30 Mar 2006
Breakfast: 2 coffee, 120g bread (319kcal,9.6g), 3 slices pastrami (58kcal, 10g protein), tomato
Brunch: Small crayfish sandwich
Lunch: Potato wedges with cheese, bacon
Supper: 160g bread (479kcal 13g), beef stew (336kcal,32g), 4 small tomatoes, milky way
Booze: 2.5 beers, 1 whisky
Snacks: Tangerine, Golden Lights crisps (94kcal)
Exercise: 5BX Chart 4 Level D+. 3.5 miles walking.

Friday 31 Mar 2006
Breakfast: 2 coffee. 40g toast (106kcal,3g), 3 slices pastrami (58kcal, 10g protein)
Lunch: small egg, sausage, bacon sandwich
Supper: 400g potatoes, 2 beef grillsteaks, carrots, broccoli. Cadbury's creme egg.
Booze: 1 beer, 1 whisky
Snacks: Golden Lights crisps (94kcal)
Exercise: 5BX Chart 4 Level C-. 3.5 miles walking. Dumb-bells: light 5.5kg 3x10, heavy 15kg 3x10

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Smells like... victory | 14 comments (14 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
Cigarettes by ambrosen (4.00 / 1) #1 Sat Apr 01, 2006 at 01:59:24 AM EST
I was going to say something patronising about buying fags, but that bit was just trollbait.

As for developing country computers, the share a mobile model seems to work very well, so it could transfer to computers. Seeing as so many people I meet will sit in front of a computer & speculate endlessly about questions google could answer in 30 seconds, I can't see them being used to full potential.

the problem is that the press never was objective. by ObviousTroll (4.00 / 3) #2 Sat Apr 01, 2006 at 04:06:37 AM EST
Whether it's a right wing venue like Fox or a left wing venue like the NY Times every news source has always had a bias. But when they pretend to be objective or "fair and balanced" they distort and deceive.


The doctor said it was the worst case of cookie-blindness he'd ever seen.
How could you tell if your press were objective? by Dr H0ffm4n (2.00 / 0) #11 Mon Apr 03, 2006 at 01:33:13 AM EST


[ Parent ]
Well, first off by ObviousTroll (2.00 / 0) #12 Mon Apr 03, 2006 at 04:33:29 AM EST
I really believe that "objectivity" is like "perfection" - a worthwhile but unattainable goal.

What I've learned to do is to read multiple sources with obviously different view points and, when things are dissonant, try to get access to the original materials.

In the above story, for example, the New York Times implies something that is absolutely unsubstantiated - none of the judges thinks Bush broke the law. The right-wing article was a more accurate reflection of the actual judges testimony. I know this because after seeing how different the articles were I found a site that posted pieces of the transcripts.

But even with that the right wing paper omitted what I thought was the most interesting thing in the transcripts: Senator Diane Feinstein tried repeatedly to get the judges to say that Bush broke FISA and the closest they would come to saying that was when one judge said "Well, if FISA were constitutional then I guess Bush would be bound by it's restrictions." Other times she asked the question, he answered by saying that Congress didn't have the authority to override the President's constitutional powers.

The implication, of course, is that this FISA judge didn't think the FISA law was constititutional.

The doctor said it was the worst case of cookie-blindness he'd ever seen.

[ Parent ]
washpost by sasquatchan (4.00 / 2) #3 Sat Apr 01, 2006 at 04:41:32 AM EST
had an article a few months ago about why balanced press is bad.. For many articles, they had to find a counter-viewpoint for balance.. And often, for stuff that's fairly mainstream and/or accepted, it's only the wackos that will give counter points.

The article was mostly an accounting of the wackos, and why we're giving them any press at all. (I want to Godwin this, but they beat me too it, as I think the big thrust was holocaust deniers and why give those nutjobs any press)

Do me a favor. by ObviousTroll (4.00 / 2) #4 Sat Apr 01, 2006 at 04:51:41 AM EST
Please compare these two stories about the same event:

Judges Speak Out on Spy Program

and

FISA judges say Bush within Law

Which one is objective?


The doctor said it was the worst case of cookie-blindness he'd ever seen.

[ Parent ]
different balances by sasquatchan (2.00 / 0) #13 Mon Apr 03, 2006 at 07:50:52 AM EST
trying to find a correct metaphor/example.

Global Warming might be an easy target, since it's big in the news now. If there is going to be a report about a scientific paper on global warming, the news writer would also have to interview a scientist that does not believe the theory of global warming.

Now change that to something net.kook worthy, say contrails. If there's a news article saying how contrails are harmless exhaust/fuel/water vapor, they'd also have to find a net.kook to say "no, it's a government mind control program," and give creedence and press to that kook.

I think that's very much different from the examples you site. I just don't know how to contextualize the difference.

[ Parent ]
I think we're saying different things. by ObviousTroll (2.00 / 0) #14 Mon Apr 03, 2006 at 04:45:46 PM EST
I'm not disagreeing with you - you think that false objectivity is pointless and I agree. But that's different from a report claiming "objectivity" to try and mask the very real biases she brings to a story.

The doctor said it was the worst case of cookie-blindness he'd ever seen.
[ Parent ]
Congratulations on hitting a normal weight! by lm (4.00 / 2) #5 Sat Apr 01, 2006 at 05:19:26 AM EST
That is no small accomplishment.

I've got half a stone to go to reach my target weight. The thing is, I've stopped trying to reach it. Between injuring my knee (making exercise problematic for months) and several successive illnesses (making watching what I eat problematic) I pretty much fell off the wagon. Your diary motivated me to step on the scale, though, and I'm down a third of a stone from my starting weight. One third more and I'll be in the normal range rather than overweight. Two thirds more and I'll be at my target.

I'm guessing that Lent is the magic reason my weight has gone down. Lent and the night classes that I've been taking. Walking through campus twice a week burns a few more calories. I really should get back with exercising regularly.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
On weight loss by ObviousTroll (4.00 / 3) #6 Sat Apr 01, 2006 at 07:49:34 AM EST
Speaking from past experience - keeping the weight off will be harder than losing it; simply because it's going to get harder and harder to keep the discipline.

I would suggest that you find a new fitness goal - not necessarily a weight target but maybe something with a secondary connection - to run a half marathon, lift ## pounds, beat the snot out of your sparring instructor, something like that.

I lost 95 pounds, kept it off for a couple of years and then started fighting a losing rear guard action.

I'm a carboholic. I know I'm a carboholic. Shut up and pass me that donut.

The doctor said it was the worst case of cookie-blindness he'd ever seen.

Maintenance is definitely harder by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #8 Sat Apr 01, 2006 at 10:35:10 PM EST
Fortunately I'm still a stone or so heavier than I was in college, so I've got a bit longer before I reach that stage.
--
It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?
[ Parent ]
How often do you switch shoes? by ammoniacal (4.00 / 2) #7 Sat Apr 01, 2006 at 09:56:56 AM EST
Let your shoes dry out, alternate the wearing of them.

That fungus is everywhere, you're not picking it up from any *specific* place.
What changes is how you keep the environment for them. Keep their living space hostile, and your immune system can keep them beat down.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

I might try that by TheophileEscargot (4.00 / 1) #9 Sat Apr 01, 2006 at 10:36:05 PM EST
I have grotesquely wide feet, which makes shoe-buying rather tedious, so I don't alternate as much as I should.
--
It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?
[ Parent ]
A celebratory fag by nebbish (2.00 / 0) #10 Mon Apr 03, 2006 at 12:27:09 AM EST
Good show.

--------
It's political correctness gone mad!

Smells like... victory | 14 comments (14 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback