Print Story Ask Husi: Bike repair stand
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By ChiefHoser (Thu Mar 02, 2006 at 05:28:09 AM EST) bikes, repair, winter, rust (all tags)
Advice from people who use bike repair stands and other stuff.


I am looking into building my own bike repair stand ala http://www.parktool.com/products/category.asp?cat=23. I am too cheap to buy one, and I figure I can build a serviceable one for quite cheap. The issue is that I have never used one before so I don't know which features are the most important and which features are useless.

I figure that it should have an adjustable height, as well as adjustable lateral position (ie. moving the bike away from and towards the centre support stand). I was also wondering about the hanging tool tray, is this something useful or would it just get in the way all of the time.

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In other news, my bike is so far holding up pretty good in the incredibly salty conditions of Halifax. I've only spotted minor rust spots on the chain, and none so far on the components. The front forks are showing a few spots, but only where the paint was previously chipped so it was expected. I look forward to having a beater winter bike so that I can replace the crappy components on this bike with good parts this summer and giving the bike a complete overhaul (which, on a side note, is the reason for a repair stand).

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Ask Husi: Bike repair stand | 13 comments (13 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
Check out Ultimate stands. by miker2 (2.00 / 0) #1 Thu Mar 02, 2006 at 05:48:54 AM EST
Ultimate makes primarily music and A/V supports but have started making bike repair stands and storage.  Their pricing seems to be better than Park and I've heard great things about them.

Later this spring I'll be looking to get one, I just have to figure out where I'll put it once I get it.

As far as building one, just make sure it's damn stable.  Trashing the frame because of a shaky stand would be teh suck.


Ah, sociopathy. How warm, how comforting, thy sweet embrace. - MNS
stability by ChiefHoser (2.00 / 0) #3 Thu Mar 02, 2006 at 06:13:04 AM EST
This is going to be the key part of whatever I build. I plan on making it very stable, and it should be too hard to make it so either.
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Chiefhoser
[ Parent ]
It depends on what, exactly, you'll be doing by ad hoc (2.00 / 0) #2 Thu Mar 02, 2006 at 05:59:46 AM EST
But here's an interesting idea. This wouldn't be good for major wrenching, but would be find for cleaning, adjusting, and small repairs.

There is at least one blogging commuter in Halifax who could probably help you out.

I've never found a whole lot of use of the tool trays other than to hold screws and whatnot. They're never big enough to hold long tools like wrenches and things. Besides, there's usually another table nearby where I do work after I've removed whatever from the bike.
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Would you rather battle Klingons or trolls?

pvc by ChiefHoser (2.00 / 0) #5 Thu Mar 02, 2006 at 06:16:07 AM EST
I thought of pvc as the tubing material, but I am planning on making a floor stand and I am worried that the increased length of tubing will make the entire stand 'wobbly'. Cheap metal piping is the way I (so far) plan to go.

As to the tray, I don't have a good table or bench to put stuff, which is why the tray might be cool, but I don't know if a long enough tray for wrenches will be strong enough to hold any weight.
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Chiefhoser

[ Parent ]
Trays by ad hoc (2.00 / 0) #8 Thu Mar 02, 2006 at 06:28:03 AM EST
The only issue you'll have with the tray is if it's too big or too unwieldy. You won't have any stability issues. Think of a dentist tray.

I also don't think PVC would by any wobblier than a lightweight metal stand. The tubing is much bulkier, though and may not scale up from a benchtop well.

Be careful with the clamp. You're looking for clamp, not a vice. You can do damage if it's too strong, esp. if you have alumin[i]um or carbon. In fact, I don't think I'd clamp carbon at all.

but then, an inexpensive repair stand doesn't cost that much, so I'm not sure it's really cost effective to build one.

Check Road Bike Review or MTB Review
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Would you rather battle Klingons or trolls?

[ Parent ]
Re by ChiefHoser (2.00 / 0) #11 Thu Mar 02, 2006 at 07:13:10 AM EST
For my current bike, the clamp isn't too much of a problem, but that may become a problem when I upgrade my bike. Cushioning of some kind may help a bit, along with simple care when tightening.

As to price, the cheapest stand I have seen here in town is on the order of 120CDN and after a really quick scan of pipe prices, I figure I can build one for 30-50CDN easily (not including my time, but that is okay as it should be fun to build).
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Chiefhoser

[ Parent ]
My advice by nebbish (2.00 / 0) #4 Thu Mar 02, 2006 at 06:15:22 AM EST
It's good to have something strong and sturdy enough for wrenching, and a good clamp. Unless you can do everything you're going to feel you've short changed yourself (especially when you're down the bike shop being told about the usual two-week wait and extortionate fee).

(Please note that I've never used a stand or clamp myself so don't really know what I'm talking about)

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It's political correctness gone mad!

Clamp by ChiefHoser (2.00 / 0) #6 Thu Mar 02, 2006 at 06:18:06 AM EST
The clamp, in my mind, might be the toughest part to obtain. I do want a strong one, but I may have to buy one from a manufacturer. I was hoping to be able to get most of the stuff down at the local hardware/building supplies store, but a suitable clamp-type device may be non-existant. I, however, have not checked as of yet.
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Chiefhoser
[ Parent ]
Yeah by nebbish (2.00 / 0) #7 Thu Mar 02, 2006 at 06:27:35 AM EST
It will probably cost money. I just need to get a normal clamp and workbench so I can get the chaindrive thingy off the back wheel, it's the bain of my life. No room though :-(

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It's political correctness gone mad!

[ Parent ]
Height and rotation are my must haves. by ambrosen (2.00 / 0) #9 Thu Mar 02, 2006 at 06:39:45 AM EST
That is, being able to tilt the bike 'uphill' and 'downhill', and being able to get the bit you want at chest height.

I can't see why you'd want to move the bike towards and away from you. Are you planning on working sitting down?

Also, my real bugbear with my bike stand is that I really need to get something that would hold my handlebars/forks in a straight ahead position while I'm working on it. They really do conspire to turn round and whack you in the head otherwise.

Handlebars by ChiefHoser (2.00 / 0) #10 Thu Mar 02, 2006 at 07:10:51 AM EST
That is a good point, I had always wondered if that'd be a problem. I might just have to rig something up to keep them in a single position.

Rotation is a good idea, I will have to implement that.
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Chiefhoser

[ Parent ]
well, you could solve this problem by 256 (2.00 / 0) #12 Thu Mar 02, 2006 at 08:05:25 AM EST
by building a trueing station right into the stand.

you know you want to.
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I don't think anyone's ever really died from smoking. --ni

[ Parent ]
Solution: by zantispam (2.00 / 0) #13 Thu Mar 02, 2006 at 08:58:04 AM EST
Toe clip strap.


Also, poke holes in yer meat with like a fork. -- blixco
[ Parent ]
Ask Husi: Bike repair stand | 13 comments (13 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback