Print Story Some Things That Bother Me
Ranting
By CheeseburgerBrown (Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 06:34:36 AM EST) scrabble, olympics, birth, racism, microsoft (all tags)
Follows is a brief overview of some of the things that are bothering me this week.


Scrabble Whiners

I seldom play Scrabble anymore and it's all the fault of Scrabble Whiners. Anyone might be a Scrabble Whiner. There's no reliable way to know in advance. I have ceased to be surprised when people I considered honourable, stalwart and true sit down in front of a Scrabble board and start whining like hungry sea-lions.

What do they whine about? Here's the top three:
#1. "My letters are terrible."

#2. "I know it's a stupid word but I have no choice."

#3. "I'm sorry I'm taking so long to make my turn."
And here are the corresponding awful truths these players are trying not to face:
#1. "Your letters are fine, stupid. Think harder!"

#2. "It is a stupid word. You probably should've spent more time on your turn."

#3. "You're making us all wait because you're stupid."
The rub, of course, is that these awful truths are voiced not by the other players but by the whiner themselves, a running interior monologue of intellectual shame whose bleating tends to surface in inverse proportion to score.

The whiner labours under the false impression that speaking some of their excuses aloud will absolve them from judgement in the event that other players make the cardinal mistake of evaluating another human being's cerebral worth and linguistic acumen on the basis of their Scrabble placings. This is a surprisingly common phobia.

I just want the whiners of the world to understand that they've ruined the game of Scrabble for me. I have no interest in sitting down at a table to hear people complain about their letter lot, bemoan the lack of opportunities on the board, lament their own cursed brains which only appear clever when nobody else is looking. I get tired of saying, "It's okay -- don't worry about it. Let's just play the game."

A piece of advice for nervous players? Just shut up. Nobody cares how low your self-esteem is.


The Olympics

I don't understand the small-talk obsession with the Olympics. Suddenly the weather isn't interesting enough for you? Jesus Murphy Brown!

Sometimes I run into people and they ask, "Are you following the Olympics?" and when I say, "No," they start to tell me all about the games, apparently labouring under the misapprehension that I am somehow not following the Olympics involuntarily and that I am therefore positively thirsty for whatever details I can get. Maybe they think my television is on the fritz (along with my borked radio, my misdelivered newspaper subscription and the fact that every computer I touch displays characters only in Sanskrit, leaving me piteously deprived of sporting news of any kind).

Newsflash: the Olympics are everywhere. If somebody tells you they're not following the games, it's on purpose.

Some Einsteins like to respond to this by asking why. They want to know whether it's the performance-enhancing drugs or the judging scandals or the endless commercialism or the devastating effect the games can have on certain sectors of the host country's economy that's turned me off.

My answer: "You misunderstand me. I said I don't care."

If I did care I'd have an opinion about those things, but since I don't care...well, I don't care. I'm not interested. My apathy is ripe and fulsome. It isn't feigned as a cover for my disgust with some element of the event -- it's a genuine lack of fascination on every level. As far as the Olympics are concerned I cannot fathom the strength to give even a single flying fuck.

My wife: "You do care, because when I put the Olympics on television you ask me to change the channel."

Me: "I would also ask you to change the channel if you tuned into static."

Old Oak: "Vhat did you think of the Svedish hockey last night, ja?"

Me: "I hear the price of tea in China is up a third of a cent."

Old Oak: "Really? Did Slozos write to you about that, ja?"

Me: "No."


Birth Inquiries

We should've lied about Baby Two's due date. The telephone rings forty times a day as people who we swore we would contact when labour began in earnest call to ask whether or not labour has begun in earnest. Those with particularly low self-esteem often supply us with their own excuses about why we might not have bothered to call them the way we'd promised, for such-and-such fanciful or unlikely or just plain retarded reason.

"No baby yet," I report.

"How are you guys doing?"

"Fine."

"Yeah, but how are you doing?"

"We're okay."

"How's Littlestar?"

"She's very pregnant and she wants the baby to come out."

"But how's she feeling?"

"Fine."

"But how is she really feeling?"

"Like she's very pregnant and she wants the baby to come out."

"Have you tried [$COMMON_LABOUR-INITIATION_REMEDY]?"

"Yes."

"That worked for us."

"I'm glad."

"You should try it."

"Thank you."

"I'm sure the baby will come any day now."

"Me too."

"You'll call me when anything happens, right?"

"Right."

"Even if it's in the middle of the night, okay?"

"Okay."

"Are you guys doing okay?"

"We're super."

"Try not to worry too much."

"Gotcha."

"Maybe the baby will come tomorrow."

"Yeah, maybe. Well, it's been nice chatting..."

"I should probably talk to Littlestar personally. Can you put her on? Is she well enough to come to the phone? How's she doing?"

Between the two of us Littlestar and I have spent a ridiculous amount of hours over the last week having that exact conversation or variations thereon dozens of times a day, often within minutes of each other. And that's not even counting the e-mails and instant messages.

If we express irritation we're told it's "only because people care" which, I submit, is a stupid thing to say since we seldom accuse our friends of expressing interest in our well-being out of a sense of spite. We're not confused about their motivations.

For the record we're at Due Date +4. That means we've still got 10 days left before the midwives will considering induction. There's no reason to panic. Littlestar's cervix is thinning and dilating slowly but surely -- the kid'll pop any day now.

We'll call you.


Self-Fulfilling Prophecies

So a fan writes to me a few weeks ago with a lot of enthusiastic things to say about something or other I'd typed. His missive was punctuated by statements about how he expected no response from me since it was likely that I am constantly deluged by similar letters. No less than three times he explained his anterior sense of understanding at the fact that I will not write back to him.

Now, the truth is that there have been occasions when I've had too much mail to deal with (notably during the height of The Darth Side's popularity and the concluding weeks of Simon of Space), but most of the time I do respond to the trickle of fan-mail that accumulates in my in-box. But this particular fellow chose to write to me when I was very, very busy with work and so I decided to follow his multiply-reinforced suggestion and not take the time to respond.

Today he writes back to tell me I'm a jackass. He didn't actually say "jackass" -- he said I was "inconsiderate" of the time and effort he had put into his letter. He said that when people put that kind of devotion into a message it's only appropriate to reply, even if it's only a few lines of acknowledgement.

Maybe he's right. Maybe the writer of these letters is owed something from me beyond the hundreds of thousands of words of stories he's already consumed for free.

...But, personally, I don't think so.

I think he's just a fuck head. He lacks even the modicum of class demonstrated by the insane neo-Christian missionary who contacted me in order to ask that I help him craft sermons that tied together George Lucas' "Force" with Yahweh's "Christ", who thanked me for my time even after I didn't write back. He wrote, "Working road-crew on the path of other people's salvation is not for everybody."

Too true.

Thus, here is my belated acknowledgement for Mark from Iowa, who took the time to write two long and heartfelt letters to me, one lavishing me with praise and the other lavishing me with vitriol: Up yours, buddy!

Lesson to the wise: if you want somebody to respond to your message don't belabour the point of how you know and understand that they won't. It has the potential to be a self-fulfilling prophecy.


Internet Explorer

What is wrong with the people who make Microsoft Internet Explorer? Do they suffer from some terrible neuronal wasting disease which causes them to fail to grasp the idea of standards compliance?

I've been tweaking my new XHTML pages for better display under various Windows operating systems and the process is frustrating in the extreme. (Like Rodney King asked, "Why can't we all just be more like Firefox?") If I had a million dollars I would pay to have all of the developers on the Explorer team flown to a big conference where somebody would explain the Web to them. We'd serve cookies.


Racism

It's been explained to me that all Muslim people are "idiots." The upshot of this pronouncement is that it really makes complex socio-geopolitical issues much easier to boil down to something comprehensively binary.

Thank goodness we keep old people in the cellar to share these insights with us.

I was lost in shades of grey but now I know what's what. I have been a fool to ignore the American religion. I have been needlessly over-complicating what is really a straight-forward situation: all Muslims are idiots. That's why they behave so badly. It's so obvious now!

The best part of this theory is how it can be effortless substantiated by making allusions to the inherently different ways of thinking that people brought up under tyranny have, and how this irretrievably dwarfs their ability to hold correct opinions or feel civilized emotions. Now, you might figure you're a crafty one -- you might say, "Yes, but what about all the Muslims living in Canada -- scholars, entrepreneurs, artists, scientists?"

Simple answer: They're not real Muslims. They've taken on our culture, and thereby spared themselves from congenital idiocy.

Amazing!

I keep meaning to ask what the fuck is the problem with black people. I mean, if nationally-sponsored terrorism, theocracy and covert nuclear weapons programmes can all be explained as simple idiocy, there must be a sweet and comprehensible reason why black people persist in being poor and shooting one another or chopping each other up with machetes even when they're not Muslims. Maybe it's a diet thing.

I have so much yet to learn.


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Some Things That Bother Me | 130 comments (130 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
How's the new job working out? by wiredog (2.00 / 0) #1 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 06:40:09 AM EST


Earth First!
(We can strip mine the rest later.)

See Hole. by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #2 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 06:42:09 AM EST
The web frees us from the tyranny of midwives by georgeha (4.00 / 3) #3 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 06:46:25 AM EST
I'm sure there are any number of web pages devoted to do-it-yourself Ceasarians. Next time someone asks about B2, tell them you're still printing out the instructions, and ask if they have any spare ether.

I think you need closure about the pairs figure skating ripoff in SLC. I agree, that French judge robbed the Canadians, but you need to let go so that you can enjoy what's left of Torino.


Should Worst Come to Worst... by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #15 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:17:21 AM EST
Castor oil isn't sure-fire by calla (2.00 / 0) #31 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:52:23 AM EST
It didn't get my first baby moving at all. Nasty stuff.

Only consistent labor inducer for my kids was the full moon. Both kids were born during full moons.


[ Parent ]
Nothing Is "Sure Fire" by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 1) #33 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 08:04:12 AM EST
And the full moon has come and gone, just a few days ago.

I'm not worried. The child will come out.


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
of course. by calla (2.00 / 0) #44 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 09:01:48 AM EST
I couldn't help but read that as

"I'm not worried. The child will come out."


[ Parent ]
Birth Inquiries management by thunderbee (4.00 / 2) #4 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 06:47:15 AM EST
I'm right there with you.
It's as if something should be wrong. When you anise that everything is OK, you must be concealing some awful secret. And we were having twins, so we had twice the "it can't be going that well"...

As for the announcement, I setup a mailing list (my small low-end cell phone can send e-mails, and even attach crappy low-res pictures), and we turned the phone off. Guaranteed calm at home, and everyone got the same e-mail at the same time.
Oh and we simply didn't give any date to anyone :)
It worked beautifully for us.

s/anise/answer/ by thunderbee (2.00 / 0) #5 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 06:47:58 AM EST
How did that happen...

[ Parent ]
Concealed Secrets by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #8 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 06:49:41 AM EST
I know this one -- Littlestar just got off the phone with somebody who when Littlestar told them she was "feeling fine" they pestered her to give a "real" answer.

The midwives said we should've fudged the expected date by a week, and now I believe them.


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
That conversation? by ammoniacal (4.00 / 1) #6 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 06:48:03 AM EST
I suspect that's what it's like being a woman, every day. And it makes sense to them.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

Oh good grief.. by littlestar (4.00 / 6) #11 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:08:51 AM EST
Are you seriously that retarded? Yes, all woman are the same... we ALL love to shop, we ALL love to watch soap operas, we ALL love to do our hair for hours. Maybe just the woman you spend time with. I am fairly teh sick of being told that I think/like/am like the stereotype that television says woman are. (Do you only like to talk about football? drink beer? watch sports? are your kids smarter then you? are you always trying to get away with some kid like prank that you keep from your wife?) I personally, have nothing in common with the people on "Everyone Loves Raymond" - none of them. sigh It's irritating being lumped with some sort of stupid, flighty, self-consumed humans (of which of course there are both woman AND men).
*twinkle*twinkle*


[ Parent ]
ATTENTION CHEESEBURGER INFIDEL: by ammoniacal (4.00 / 1) #19 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:21:38 AM EST
Please to be logging off your wife's account.

are you always trying to get away with some kid like prank that you keep from your wife?
Actually, yes, most of the time.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
As If. by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 5) #21 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:23:58 AM EST
This is begging by sasquatchan (2.00 / 0) #38 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 08:32:17 AM EST
for a hormonal woman comment ;) Alas, that's Mr. Ammonical's shtick, as already demonstrated..

[ Parent ]
Everybody Loves Raymond by 606 (2.00 / 0) #41 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 08:44:27 AM EST
Is the worst show on TV.

Luckily I get loads of laughs by immatating that pathetic gutteral back-of-the-throat delivery of his.

-----
imagine dancing banana here

[ Parent ]
He's reliving the past. by calla (4.00 / 1) #48 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 09:19:07 AM EST
He's had women in his life that were into the crap you listed.

Like a broken record, he gets stuck in his anti-women rants. Luckily for me, the occurrences are becoming less and less frequent.


[ Parent ]
Ah-HA! by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 1) #66 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 11:04:40 AM EST
truth. by calla (4.00 / 1) #68 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 11:41:20 AM EST
We all make our own truths, some of us better than others.


[ Parent ]
That's A Lie! by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 1) #84 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 02:01:29 PM EST
We all make our own truths, some of us better than others.

That's too profound for me to parse with any certainty. These truths we construct -- are they subjective truths, like rationalized perpsectives on one's place in the world -- or are they objective truths like the kind God likes?

In either case, how is the efficacy of the truth determined? If some truth-constructs are better than others, what is our basis for evaluation? Water-resistance? Buoyancy? Death-toll?

I need answers, damn it! Answers!


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
42 by ShadowNode (4.00 / 1) #85 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 02:22:10 PM EST
There you go, one answer.

[ Parent ]
That Is A Notoriously Unsatisfying Answer. by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #89 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 03:05:40 PM EST
You didn't ask for a satisfying answer by ShadowNode (2.00 / 0) #93 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 04:22:55 PM EST
Shennanigans are fun, I hear they make babies come out and help you win at Olympic Scrabble.

[ Parent ]
Truth - you ready? by calla (2.00 / 0) #92 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 03:11:17 PM EST
This is a vibrational universe.

We are vibrational beings.

Our thoughts and feelings are also vibrations.

Vibrations are like magnets - like attracts like.

Our thoughts and feelings attract like vibrations.

We create our reality/truth whether we realize it or not.


[ Parent ]
Celestine Prophecy? by iGrrrl (2.00 / 0) #94 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 06:40:59 PM EST
Or Free Zone Scientology?

"Beautiful wine, talking of scattered everythings"
(and thanks to Scrymarch)

[ Parent ]
Neither? by calla (2.00 / 0) #95 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:24:52 PM EST
It's not quack religious crap. This is science.


[ Parent ]
Not biting by iGrrrl (2.00 / 0) #110 Tue Feb 21, 2006 at 07:38:04 AM EST
It seems to me you confuse objectivity, which is essential to science, with certainty, which is more appropriate to religion. Scientific objectivity is not at all the same as certainty. To pursue it you must give up the desire/search for certainty.

William Benzon (speaking to one of the artists on the Art With Brain in Mind list)

"Beautiful wine, talking of scattered everythings"
(and thanks to Scrymarch)

[ Parent ]
Where do you read certainty? by calla (2.00 / 0) #111 Tue Feb 21, 2006 at 07:55:03 AM EST
I've used the word truth - but that was the theme. Maybe you pulled the wrong quote?

On a different subject - as a scientist do you really believe that most research is done with scientific objectivity? I have worked with many scientists, and objective they are not. The studies are always performed with a goal in mind.


[ Parent ]
okay, so I'll nibble by iGrrrl (4.00 / 3) #112 Tue Feb 21, 2006 at 08:17:02 AM EST
The point of the quote was the second half.  The idea of Truth requires certainty, which is something I've pretty much given up.

I have a problem with pronouncing something as universally true.  Scientists mostly speak the language of doubt, basing statements (in their scholarly writing) on observations, with appropriate caveats.  The easiest example of appropriate scientific reporting is the example of the Fair Witness from Heinlein's Stranger in a Strange Land.  When asked what color a house is, the Witness answers, "It's white on this side."

I'm on the Nothing is True side of things, though I tend to believe things as needed for daily function (cars are big metal things that can kill me), and as useful for hypothesis generation.  You're welcome to believe that it's all vibrations, and that will be true for you.  Given that I have a different frame of reference, cultural baggage, &c, you can believe it's true for me, too, but I don't have to share that belief.

Science is a method, and people practice it.  Some people do it with more objectivity than others.  As a method, though, it tends to self-correct the information over the long haul.  The quality of the information often rests upon the resolution of the measuring tools.  So, until you demonstrate your belief can be corroborated by consistent results using controlled experiments with observations that can be replicated by independent groups, it would be inappropriate, IMO, to call it science.

"Beautiful wine, talking of scattered everythings"
(and thanks to Scrymarch)

[ Parent ]
Bless Your Heart. by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #113 Tue Feb 21, 2006 at 08:38:53 AM EST
Lengthy reply and all by calla (2.00 / 0) #115 Tue Feb 21, 2006 at 10:46:18 AM EST
but it only explains your beliefs or truths, and doesn't effect my earlier statement - by your own definition.

Cute fictional reference.

Your experience with scientists is far different from mine. I have yet to see self-correcting studies come from the pharmaceutical scientists I've worked with. With them, it's all about manipulating data to support their paychecks.


[ Parent ]
I work with academics by iGrrrl (2.00 / 0) #116 Tue Feb 21, 2006 at 02:27:58 PM EST
Which is a different animal in terms of rewards and punishments.  They're rewarded for getting it right.  As you said, the pharma scientists have an agenda, which is the company's agenda, which is profit.

but it only explains your beliefs or truths, and doesn't effect my earlier statement - by your own definition.

Right.  You can call it science all you want, if you define science differently than most of the rest of the world, including the people who actually do it.  You can call it TRUTH, and I can shrug and say, "It's true for you, and it's not science by any definition I recognize."

"Beautiful wine, talking of scattered everythings"
(and thanks to Scrymarch)

[ Parent ]
Didn't you say you'd given up certainty? by calla (2.00 / 0) #117 Tue Feb 21, 2006 at 10:05:50 PM EST
Except when it comes to science - your definition of that is concrete and definitive?

Not all scientists are alike. Would you like to bet that not all scientists have the same views on what is and isn't science?

Can we say that scientific definitions vary?

Can you truly say that you know what the world's scientists believe. That's assuming a lot for someone who claims to have given up certainty.

p.s. I failed to mention it before, but I have worked with academic scientists - I've done illustrations for studies that were extremely manipulated to prove a theory. I didn't stay with the projects, so I can't say if time balanced out their subjective conclusions.


[ Parent ]
Science And Belief Are Discrete Concepts by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #118 Wed Feb 22, 2006 at 03:56:16 AM EST
Can we say that scientific definitions vary?

Not really. Scientists may differ but science is constant in that it is a systematic exploration of physical phenomena through application of the scientific method. If every scientist in the world suddenly went crazy and decided that faking results and making up imaginary conclusions was a righteous way to be that wouldn't change science itself -- it would just make them unsuccessful adherents to the method.

Except when it comes to science - your definition of that is concrete and definitive?

Epistemelogical (sp?) certainty (like Plato's truth-in-itself or the Ultimate Form of Truth) being unknowable (or unverifiable in an objective sense) is a lot different from reaching conclusions about the semantic truths of ideas. Treating the two as one is either naive or disingenuous.

Not all scientists are alike. Would you like to bet that not all scientists have the same views on what is and isn't science?

Maybe, but you'd have a very hard time finding any group of scientists respected within their fields to agree together that Universal Vibration is scientific in nature, or even based on science in a meaningful way.

I respect your right/desire/need to find metaphors to help you relate to the universe and the way you operate as a being. Personally I wouldn't pit one metaphor against another...

But when you compare a metaphor like Universal Vibration to an actual systematic way of deconstructing and understanding the processes of the world you're mixing oil and water.

I read through several websites and skimmed through one thick PDF. It reminds me a lot of the mystical insights my old roommate the Black Serb would have when he'sd sort of quasi-understood some element of a scientific idea. It's a very old formula: mix grains of truth with pleasing analogies, and the result is a potentially inspirational bath of ideas known for centuries as "mumbo-jumbo."

Like I've commented elsewhere in this diary (chatting with Man), I am the last one to rain on anyone's parade for the kind of mumbo-jumbo they might consume to help put their spiritual life in perspective. That's cool. If it helps people live well, it's excellent.

But it isn't real. Even when reality is unknowable, you can still detect the smell of old-fashioned snake-oil. When two dudes come up with a new spiritual movement (founded 2005) and initiate their newfound enlightenment by selling dumbed-down versions of it on audio-books at exorbitant prices, a critical person should be suspicious.

Granted, versions of Universal Vibration have been around for a long while. Great tracks of the text read like Yoda talking about The Force. It shares some similarities with that whole yin-yang eating scheme where you only eat stuff that rhymes with your chakras or whatever. Harmony and disharmony, resonation and cancelling out of energies -- all classic metaphors.

The beauty of modern movements is that they can quote a except from a paper on String Theory none of the readers are qualified to parse and then claim that it demonstrates that these vibrations are literal. This gives "scientific" validity.

But bullshit smells like bullshit. Any relation to the eternal truths of the human condition is largely poetic coincidence.

Believe in bullshit. We all do, in one form or another. But let's call a spade a spade.

Science differs from belief. That doesn't mean scientists don't have beliefs (often stupid ones), and it doesn't mean belief is irrelevant. But there's not the same thing. They're not even in the same country. The conclusions of one can be systematically examined, while the conclusions of the other avoid systematic examination.

If doesn't matter how many scientists fuck up being a scientist. It doesn't even matter if their conclusions are correct. What matters is that there is an established impartial method for deconstructing their results and comparing them to other results. If they've borked the science, we'll all be able to see.

I didn't stay with the projects, so I can't say if time balanced out their subjective conclusions.

Well of course you didn't! What kind of time-scales do you think these things work on? The self-correction isn't instantaneous. Some bad science hangs out there for decades before it's reanalyzed. But reanalyzed it is.

Individual scientists come and go but their studies -- whether the conclusions they draw are correct or incorrect -- add to a pool of data that is greater than any one live, or even one civilization.

Religion, on the other hand, is a fart in the wind. It changes flavour depending on what you've eaten, and dissipates before you can even really get a fix on it. This is acceptable, because the "human truths" central to spiritual belief are constant because they're instinctive (or a byproduct of some other instinctive process). That's a lucky bonus -- it means you can dress up spirituality in whatever cloth you have handy.

The fallacy is thinking the cloth itself is important.

Okay, I'm sure I've rambled and offended your beliefs enough now. I have to go downstairs and make sure my wife isn't having the baby without me.

Kisses!


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
Science is a method of finding by calla (2.00 / 0) #119 Wed Feb 22, 2006 at 05:05:44 AM EST
knowledge about the universe around us.

It's simple, but there's a lot of complexity that can fit within that definition. A lot of variation. There's much debate over what fits within the scientific definition within the scientific community and the world in general.

The comment above that started this thread is merely a scientific theory. It is one I like. Because you don't like it doesn't mean it wasn't derived from scientific methods.

Show me your scientific studies or polls that say that the scientific theory I've presented isn't accepted by any group of scientists respected within their fields. Is your data from a scientific study or is it just your belief?

You researched the internet and now you've become an expert. This is totally acceptable scientific method?

Religion is belief, faith, and community. The theory I presented may be part of some mumbo jumbo religion that I don't know about. There are religions in this world about pasta. Was the chef who created pasta religious about his pasta?

Honestly, I don't care about your opinion on this matter. I was interested in the debate I had with iGrrl. She works in the scientific community - as I have. No disrespect.


[ Parent ]
I Don't Know If Its Truth But I Know What I Likes by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #120 Wed Feb 22, 2006 at 06:19:04 AM EST
Science is a method of finding knowledge about the universe around us.

Right -- but not any method for finding knowledge, but a specific one. Whatever you thought you were arguing with iGrrrl, when you call non-science science you're gonna get called on that malarky.

Show me your scientific studies or polls that say that the scientific theory I've presented isn't accepted by any group of scientists respected within their fields.

I'm not planning on funding that study. If a literate amateur with a basic education in science can see the bogus logic with a quick gloss of the material then it would seem to be a waste of resources. Occasionally the obvious needs to be proven to ground it in data -- other times it would just be kinda funny.

You researched the internet and now you've become an expert. This is totally acceptable scientific method?

I didn't "research the Internet" -- I read the free materials made available by the authors of the theory. I didn't claim to be an expert, nor a scientist.

The comment above that started this thread is merely a scientific theory. It is one I like. Because you don't like it doesn't mean it wasn't derived from scientific methods.

It is not a scientific theory. That's not a matter of whether one "likes" the content. If a crowd of juggling artists told me their show was in fact a traditional Chinese puppet-show, my opinion on whether or not they juggled well doesn't enter it. No puppets, you understand. It's a dead giveaway.

Don't ask me to list all the things that make it clear this theory is the money-making venture of two self-appointed gurus rather than a legitimate piece of inquiry into the physical universe. It would be embarassing for everyone involved.

Honestly, I don't care about your opinion on this matter. I was interested in the debate I had with iGrrl. She works in the scientific community - as I have. No disrespect.

The fact that you're willing to be fleeced by such obvious charlatans speaks more than employment history ever could.

On the other hand, I am very glad tot know you'll take all of this arguing positively. I hope you do. As I said in the other thread, I think it's very brave to put your beliefs on display for possible criticism and it takes guts to defend your point of view.

I believe such frankness deserved candour in kind, which is why I haven't beat around the bush.


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
String theory/universal vibration by calla (4.00 / 1) #121 Wed Feb 22, 2006 at 07:21:54 AM EST
is a scientific theory. Although still debated. Your belief that it isn't scientific doesn't change that.

One constant in science is that the scientific community moves slowly. Even Einstein's contemporaries didn't agree with his ground-breaking theories. I know for a fact that a percentage of the scientific community agrees with universal vibration theory. Scientists are working on ways of figuring it out now. Scientists figuring out our universe - using scientific methods to gain better understanding of universal vibration.

I'll admit - I learned of this theory from Wayne Dyer, PhD. Some think he's a charlatan. Universal Vibration is not something he made up. Whether you doubt his credibility or not, the theory is not his.

As for being fleeced - I have had nothing negative in my experience believing what I have learned from Mr. Dyer. I have only positive experiences. I watch his free broadcasts on PBS and buy his books. Would you consider that being fleeced? Do you believe you are fleecing those that buy your books?

Your sincerity is questionable, but hell, I love debate.


[ Parent ]
"Nature" Misses The Boat by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #130 Mon Feb 27, 2006 at 03:37:13 AM EST
Universal vibration is a scientific theory. Although still debated. Your belief that it isn't scientific doesn't change that.

My belief that it isn't a scientific theory is based largely (though not exclusively) on the fact that the only people who seem to be willing to talk about it are quack-like. Please do point me toward a critique of Universal Vibration from a researcher who is not profiting from the theory. I've been searching in my spare moments for the better part of a week. I don't know what I'm doing wrong, but I can't seem to find a scientific debate on the subject anywhere! Please help.

Also, in your comment you "slashed" String Theory and Universal Vibration together, as if they were bodies of thought similar enough to be considered as a package. That's...odd. Most coherent theories can rise or fall on their own merits -- they don't have to attach themselves to other popular theories for support. That's an emotional mode of persuasion, not a scientific one.

As for being fleeced - I have had nothing negative in my experience believing what I have learned from Mr. Dyer.

Who ever said being fleeced felt bad? Human beings open themselves up for all kinds of regular fleecings, as I mentioned earlier in the thread. Why so negative on the fleecing? As I argued, it's normal and healthy.


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
sure, scientific definitions may very. by garlic (2.00 / 0) #122 Wed Feb 22, 2006 at 06:16:59 PM EST
So do crackpots.


[ Parent ]
so does spelling? n/t by calla (2.00 / 0) #126 Wed Feb 22, 2006 at 07:45:36 PM EST



[ Parent ]
Magnets. by ambrosen (2.00 / 0) #100 Tue Feb 21, 2006 at 01:32:30 AM EST
I suggest you revise that one.

[ Parent ]
pulled together, bozo. by calla (2.00 / 0) #105 Tue Feb 21, 2006 at 06:44:44 AM EST
I already said like attracts like.


[ Parent ]
Not stoned enough for this conversation. by ambrosen (2.00 / 0) #106 Tue Feb 21, 2006 at 06:47:23 AM EST
Nor do I ever intend to be so.

I never metaphysics I could wrangle with myself. I always left it to other people to struggle them out for me.

[ Parent ]
There's a reason you started it. by calla (2.00 / 0) #108 Tue Feb 21, 2006 at 06:57:42 AM EST
There are over one hundred comments in this diary, yet you chose to reply to the metaphysical one.

Do you wonder why?


[ Parent ]
I just pointed out that +ve attracts -ve, by ambrosen (2.00 / 0) #109 Tue Feb 21, 2006 at 07:20:27 AM EST
not vice versa.

[ Parent ]
doh. by garlic (2.00 / 0) #124 Wed Feb 22, 2006 at 06:28:59 PM EST
didn't see you spell this out. If it helps, electrons also act this way (pushing away from each other).


[ Parent ]
actually, by garlic (2.00 / 0) #123 Wed Feb 22, 2006 at 06:27:35 PM EST
that's not how magnets work. like actually pushes away like.


[ Parent ]
Read the thread n/t by calla (2.00 / 0) #127 Wed Feb 22, 2006 at 11:32:08 PM EST



[ Parent ]
I'm Was Born Ready. by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 1) #101 Tue Feb 21, 2006 at 03:27:46 AM EST
I appreciate your answering honestly despite the obvious potential for becoming a target of mockery.

That was brave.


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
truth is easy. by calla (2.00 / 0) #107 Tue Feb 21, 2006 at 06:51:39 AM EST
I've never experienced anything different than what I expressed in the previous comment.

When you are truly feeling good/positive, only good/positive things happen.

I dare you to try it.


[ Parent ]
Well, There's 'The Truth' and 'The Truth' by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #114 Tue Feb 21, 2006 at 08:44:58 AM EST
True truth has always failed to prove its relevance to me.

I dare you to try it.

You're daring me? Psshaw. I'm on a good karma streak thirty-one years long. I'm not changing a damn thing, lest I muck it up.

I've never experienced anything different than what I expressed in the previous comment.

You've lost me there. I was born yesterday, sucking broadband. I need links to wade through such references. I don't have much RAM this week.


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
awesome! by garlic (2.00 / 0) #125 Wed Feb 22, 2006 at 06:29:59 PM EST
Only sad people get hit by trucks, and only happy people win the lottery!


[ Parent ]
complexities of string theory by calla (2.00 / 0) #128 Wed Feb 22, 2006 at 11:36:17 PM EST
a little hard for you to grasp? Here's a site that explains the basics.


[ Parent ]
how bout this by garlic (2.00 / 0) #129 Thu Feb 23, 2006 at 03:45:00 AM EST
The science part of string theory doesn't have anything to do with making people happy, or keeping people happy.


[ Parent ]
lets go shopping! by LilFlightTest (2.00 / 0) #79 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 12:04:17 PM EST
we can get our hair and nails done on the way!!

i avoid being that woman. dear gord.
Send me to Austria!

[ Parent ]
Senseless Gashes by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 3) #18 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:20:23 AM EST
I suspect that's what it's like being a woman, every day.

Well, stupid women, I guess.

There is less social pressure on women than men to appear intelligent, so I suspect some borderline chicks might adopt similar camouflage, too.

But flightiness and shallowness I don't accept as instrinsic to gender, unless I've terribly misread you.


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
hahah by sasquatchan (4.00 / 4) #7 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 06:48:29 AM EST
Me: "I hear the price of tea in China is up a third of a cent."

Old Oak: "Really? Did Slozos write to you about that, ja?"

ziiiing..

I can't tell who is trolling who there.. hahahah.

WHOM! by debacle (4.00 / 1) #14 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:15:36 AM EST
who is trolling WHOM

IF YOU HAVE TWO FIRLES THOROWNF MONEY ART SUOCIDE GIRLS STRIPPER HPW CAN YPUS :OSE?!?!?!?(elcevisides).

[ Parent ]
Extend Your Pinky While You Drink High Tea. by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 2) #20 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:23:01 AM EST
Everybody knows only dumb people try to talk like they're smart and like everybody else is dumb just because they don't know some stupid inconsistent rules that nobody cares about anyways because they're pretentious and snobs, at least that's what my point is.


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
Tickle Your Balls Whilst You Drink Cheap Beer by debacle (2.00 / 0) #39 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 08:36:39 AM EST
Your point fails it, as the rules (known here as The Basic Conventions of the English Language) are clearly consistent and relevant, and only the pretentiously colloqual claim otherwise.

IF YOU HAVE TWO FIRLES THOROWNF MONEY ART SUOCIDE GIRLS STRIPPER HPW CAN YPUS :OSE?!?!?!?(elcevisides).

[ Parent ]
shouldn't that be by 256 (4.00 / 2) #26 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:41:05 AM EST
"whom is trolling whom"?
---
I don't think anyone's ever really died from smoking. --ni
[ Parent ]
No by debacle (4.00 / 1) #37 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 08:31:51 AM EST
Who is a subject, while whom is an object.

IF YOU HAVE TWO FIRLES THOROWNF MONEY ART SUOCIDE GIRLS STRIPPER HPW CAN YPUS :OSE?!?!?!?(elcevisides).

[ Parent ]
thank you by 256 (4.00 / 1) #40 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 08:39:21 AM EST
for your earnest response to a grammatical quandry which has been troubling me for quite some time.

i was afraid you might think i was simply trolling you.
---
I don't think anyone's ever really died from smoking. --ni

[ Parent ]
HIBT? by debacle (4.00 / 2) #42 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 08:46:14 AM EST
Sincerity is lost on the internet, where Dark Lord Sarcasm reigns supreme.

IF YOU HAVE TWO FIRLES THOROWNF MONEY ART SUOCIDE GIRLS STRIPPER HPW CAN YPUS :OSE?!?!?!?(elcevisides).

[ Parent ]
The baby is obviously... by jayhawk88 (4.00 / 1) #9 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:00:43 AM EST
Waiting until February 21st. Lots of amazing, intellectual people born on February 21st.

Editor, please correct the parent by georgeha (4.00 / 1) #10 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:06:43 AM EST
he meant the 23rd.


[ Parent ]
26th, You Clod! by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #13 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:15:07 AM EST
My brother and I have the same birthday -- is it too much to ask for my son to toe the line?


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
Only if you name him the same as you by georgeha (2.00 / 0) #17 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:19:41 AM EST
Whilest my dad and I have different bdays, we have the same first and last name, and same middle initial, make for a few ROFLDOFLs when running credit reports.

I'm sure same name and same bday will really frustrate the credit companies.


[ Parent ]
The Unborn Child Is Named. by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #22 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:25:58 AM EST
And his name is neither "Matthew" nor "Cheeseburger."

His first name is already on my website's site-map, for those who care enough to poke around. I've prepared a template for the kid's homepage in advance.

By the bye: should we be calling you "Junior" from now on?


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
Nope, the middle name is different by georgeha (2.00 / 0) #30 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:49:46 AM EST
hence no Junior.

I didn't want to cyberstalk you and find out your hidden home page.


[ Parent ]
HAHAHAHA!!! I WEEEEEEEEN!!! by ammoniacal (4.00 / 1) #50 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 09:39:31 AM EST
Sebastian Shaw, eh?

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
We Shaw Not. by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 3) #51 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 10:08:46 AM EST
How could I possibly condone a name that references a man who was digitally replaced by Hayden Christenson? That would make me no better than a dog-eating corpse-raping Muhammedean.

...And you know what they're like.


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
Yeah, they're idiots. by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #61 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 10:54:43 AM EST
Except for the ones who've taken on our culture, of course.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
We In Canada Feel Particularly Deprived... by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 1) #63 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 10:59:16 AM EST
i approve by LilFlightTest (2.00 / 0) #78 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 12:03:42 PM EST
its what i was going to call my first son. you stole it.
Send me to Austria!
[ Parent ]
So the truth comes out by jayhawk88 (2.00 / 0) #28 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:47:07 AM EST
You're not so much waiting for the baby, as you are preventing his escape until the desired date.

[ Parent ]
Yeah, That's It. by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 3) #29 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:49:10 AM EST
I'm like that little Dutch boy except my wife isn't a lesbian.

(Get it? Get it? Huh huh b'huh huh heh huh. I'm fucking Beavis!)


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
but but but by joh3n (4.00 / 5) #12 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:13:03 AM EST
Has she tried watching curling on the olympics while squatting and eating kimchi all the while also listening to mozart, thinking about waterfalls, juggling two hams and reading "The O'Reilly Factor for Kids"?

If not, she really isn't trying to have this baby yet.  For shame.

----

I would like to be the proverbial fly on the wall. by toxicfur (4.00 / 2) #16 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:17:48 AM EST
when you make these suggestions to a 9-months-pregnant Mrs. j3. On second thought, maybe not. I would likely end up as a smudge on that proverbial wall.
--
damn it, lif eis actually really *far4 too good at tghe momnent, shboyukbnt;t whilen. --Dr Thrustgood
[ Parent ]
two points regrading scrabble by 256 (4.00 / 1) #23 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:30:14 AM EST
You seem to make offhand reference to some sort of letter placing game played with more than two players. This is NOT scrabble, but rather some twisted pretender of which mother hasbro is simply too pitying to litigate back to the swamp from whence it spawned.

also, when playing scrabble, especially against new opponents, and especially in the early rounds of the game, i consider an apology about turn length entirely reasonable. the information being imparted here is that i have good enough letters and the board position is good enough that there is a large potential point payoff to my spending a little more time with my letters, but that though i may spend five minutes on this turn, one should not assume that all of my future turns will be likewise.

also, you have forgotten to censure the most unforgivable of the scrabble whiner, who can somehow find it within themselves to utter:

"that's not a real word"

as though they were somehow a greater authority on the validity of the word "aa" than the scrabble dictionary. perhaps these people imagine the agreed upon test is that the word in question should first appear in the chosen word list, and secondly be presented to both players such that they may sniff its metaphorical cork and deem it worthy of the board.

fuck em.
---
I don't think anyone's ever really died from smoking. --ni

"Scrabble" by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 1) #25 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:41:03 AM EST
the information being imparted here is that i have good enough letters and the board position is good enough that there is a large potential point payoff to my spending a little more time with my letters, but that though i may spend five minutes on this turn, one should not assume that all of my future turns will be likewise.

Were that my experience I would be more forgiving. I lose face as the comments are repeated, sometimes becoming so familiar that they can trail off into an elipsis without impairing the information value. "I'm sorry, it's just that..."

The only times it is appropriate to apologize or otherwise blither in Scrabble or Scrabble-like games are the following:

- You've just knocked over the board, or thrown up on it.

- You're dyslexic and/or speak poor English and you keep insisting that your particular and unique spellings are valid, or at least should be valid "you know, considering..." I consider nothing!

- You don't know what a proper noun is and you keep putting down invalid words on that basis.

- You leave the game without explanation and do not return for several days, and when you do return you smell.

- You cannot stop yourself from gnawing on the letters, or you have accidentally swallowed one of the letters.

- You hit people for no reason when they are trying to think of a word.

- You have soiled yourself and require a few minutes to clean up before play can resume.

- You're experiencing a medical emergency.

- Every word you put down in a synonym for a sex act or a private part of the body. In this case, an apology may be warranted if you're playing with nuns or other sensitive people.

- You fingers shake so much because you're off H that every time you put down a letter you disturb the entire board, and then retch loudly in the corner.

- You set things on fire a lot.


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
Hmm... by Gully Foyle (2.00 / 0) #34 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 08:16:58 AM EST
I get the feeling that playing scrabble against you would tend to exacerbate any lack of self confidence in an opponent. I imagine that a man of your vocabulary doesn't fuck around...

[ Parent ]
Littlestar Always Wins. by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #35 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 08:20:07 AM EST
you forgot some by 606 (4.00 / 2) #43 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 09:00:46 AM EST
  • When you get all E's.
  • You looked at my letters.
  • I did not.
  • Yes you did.
  • No I did not!
  • Would you please stop sawing the table?
  • What? I am not.
  • You are so!
  • Am not.
  • Why do you always have to saw everything in this house?
  • Why are you always shaking your eyes.
  • I... I don't shake 'em.
  • Yes you do. You're always shaking your eyes here, shaking your eyes there... why don't you go join some shib-uh Shake-a-rock-a-roll band?! Hey, don't shake your eyes at me lady, that's what they say!
  • Atomic bombs.
Someone'd better get that reference.

-----
imagine dancing banana here
[ Parent ]
props by 256 (4.00 / 1) #57 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 10:36:47 AM EST
national film board styles.

watched that one just a few weeks ago while on a dinner date with a lovely lady from work down at the futuristic nfb viewing pods round richmond and john.
---
I don't think anyone's ever really died from smoking. --ni

[ Parent ]
It's Time For "Sawing for Teens"! by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 1) #58 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 10:37:12 AM EST
Hey, I see by looking right that you've stuffed our collective hole with an "ATTN Toronto Infidels" post -- does that mean you'll be gracing us with your presence?

(You could meet my boy! I, myself, am looking forward to the priv.)

"The Big Snit" is awesome. I love Conkie. (That's his name, isn't it? I can't remember his given name. I wonder if he's related to Heather Conkie of Report Canada fame?)


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
Richard Condie by 606 (4.00 / 1) #96 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:27:07 PM EST
I'm a big fan of his work, though I don't know what he's been doing lately. The Big Snit and The Cat Came Back are both wonderful films. His last film was La Salla which was a pretty psychedelic 3d flick in a "I don't know how to use Maya so let's play with the scale tool" sort of vein. Dunno what happened after that. Seems he disappeared from the face of the Earth.

Yes, I am indeed heading to the T-dot on the weekend of April 29, and I would love to visit you and your wife, offspinglets, pets, and assorted hang-abouts. I'm not sure if I'll be able to make it up to the Schoolhouse, though. I don't really want to rent a car. We will have to work out ride sharing type arrangements. I really don't know the details as of yet.

I'm excited!

-----
imagine dancing banana here

[ Parent ]
We'll Drive To You. by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 1) #102 Tue Feb 21, 2006 at 03:29:31 AM EST
If all goes well I should have a car by then -- an even older and even more mismatched-part Volvo than the one I get to borrow now!


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
I suspect, by ambrosen (2.00 / 0) #69 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 11:41:42 AM EST
that say, about 2 items into that list, you ran out of things to say. As it stands, the list seems a touch eclectic.

[ Parent ]
Greater authority than the Scrabble dictionary. by Driusan (2.00 / 0) #49 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 09:26:57 AM EST
I, like everyone else, am a greater authority on the validity of the word than the Scrabble dictionary or any other dictionary, damnit. Languages evolve, words evolve, dictionaries only try to capture what words are used at the time of publication for other reference.

Zen is a word even though it isn't in the scrabble dictionary.
Cunt is a word even though it isn't in the scrabble dictionary.
and god damnit ror should have been a word.

I propose the following changes to Scrabble to make it more linguistically valid:

  1. Scrabble shall become a 3 person game.
  2. Challenges shall be determined democratically.


--
Vive le Montréal libre.
[ Parent ]
lolwhat by 256 (2.00 / 0) #53 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 10:16:12 AM EST
the question has nothing to do with linguistics. rather it is a question of a formal system with a large but limited predefined list of token arrangements.

i prefer to keep it that way.
---
I don't think anyone's ever really died from smoking. --ni

[ Parent ]
Whether something is a "real" word by Driusan (2.00 / 0) #55 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 10:30:32 AM EST
is a question of linguistics.

and I vote lolwhat is a real word.

--
Vive le Montréal libre.

[ Parent ]
Cunt is one of the words by ambrosen (4.00 / 1) #71 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 11:44:44 AM EST
that is permissible, but not published in the Scrabble dictionary.

[ Parent ]
One of many. by Driusan (4.00 / 1) #86 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 02:32:50 PM EST
This is what a real man's Scrabble game should look like:

Vroom!

--
Vive le Montréal libre.

[ Parent ]
Ex, Ax, Jo by ambrosen (4.00 / 1) #99 Tue Feb 21, 2006 at 01:31:35 AM EST
These are the only three two letter words with high scoring letters in. Until Qi, Az and Xi get permitted with the new dictionary.

[ Parent ]
You're clearly mistaken. by Driusan (2.00 / 0) #103 Tue Feb 21, 2006 at 05:40:13 AM EST
There's oj, yo, and vd.

--
Vive le Montréal libre.
[ Parent ]
Not according to Hasbro. by ambrosen (2.00 / 0) #104 Tue Feb 21, 2006 at 06:31:27 AM EST


[ Parent ]
Things that annoy me: by Breaker (4.00 / 1) #24 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:33:53 AM EST
People who play Scrabble too quickly, and patronise others who have a different style.

In snooker terms, Alex "Hurricane" Higgins used to demolish the table in minutes, whereas Steve "Interesting" Davies used to play the more measured, calculating game.  Both great players in their own right, but very differing styles of play.


You're Not A Real Word. by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #27 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:43:30 AM EST
People who play Scrabble too quickly, and patronise others who have a different style.

You've missed the point, my dear Breaker.

I didn't rail against people who play Scrabble slowly -- I railed against people who bitch about it.


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
Question: by FlightTest (2.00 / 0) #83 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 01:52:59 PM EST
Have you considered that the scrabble players you railed against exist mainly due to the scrabble players breaker railed against?



[ Parent ]
Answer: by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 1) #91 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 03:08:22 PM EST
Have you considered that the scrabble players you railed against exist mainly due to the scrabble players breaker railed against?

Causality is too confusing. Forget causality.

I say Scrabble is often a game of patience, and those who moan or jibber ought to be struck dumb by God.

I have a cold and I'm cranky.


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
Then clearly by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #98 Tue Feb 21, 2006 at 01:23:18 AM EST
We're on the same side.

When do we move in?


[ Parent ]
Heh by Bob Abooey (4.00 / 3) #32 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 07:58:29 AM EST
I actually wrote an email to the author of some book, the name and author escape me, and was surprised when she wrote me back and thanked me for the kind words. That sparked something in me along the lines that I was going to, from that point forward, send a thank you email to every author (the ones who make their emails available) that I enjoy, well, the ones who are alive anyways, which are few as it turns out, in an effort to flood the world with positive crap, as opposed to the negative stuff. You know, cause people will complain when they don't like something but how often do they un-complain when the opposite is true.

Well, long story short, I forgot all about it and never emailed anyone ever again and just look at the sad state the world is in as a direct result.

Warmest regards,
--Your best pal Bob

I emailed a band I saw on Friday by 606 (2.00 / 0) #45 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 09:02:34 AM EST
and they emailed me back and thanked me for the kind words.

Of course they weren't exactly famous but they were pretty cool.

-----
imagine dancing banana here

[ Parent ]
I Usually Do Write Back. by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #54 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 10:23:09 AM EST
Firstly, on an emotional level, I usually reply because despite pockets of misanthropy I do think of myself as basically friendly, and so I like chatting with strangers.

Secondly, on a crasser level, I reply because I file their e-mail addresses away so that I can later bother them about buying a book, and if I get a personal mail in there somewhere the promotional e-mail feels less spammy to the recipient.

I usually feel bad if I don't reply. Just not this time.


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
hey by Man (2.00 / 0) #62 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 10:56:50 AM EST
You wrote me back. I'm saving the email forever for when you're famous.

[ Parent ]
Stuff by Man (4.00 / 1) #36 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 08:25:49 AM EST
Personally, I only think muslims are idiots only in the sense that all people who prefer fairy tales to logic are.

Speaking of which...have you tried prayer? I hear that works...

You don't need to reply to this if you've got more important things to do.

Too bad you're not in the US...you could just rant about how American TV has ruined Olympic coverage.

The prime reason Internet Explorer sucks is because it had no competition. IE 7.0 should improve matters.

I hate scrabble.

Religiosity == Idiocy by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 1) #56 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 10:34:17 AM EST
Personally, I only think muslims are idiots only in the sense that all people who prefer fairy tales to logic are.

I think that's disingenuous. You know full well there are intelligent people who believe in fairy tales -- you know, like those famous religious scientists people trot out to show how faith and scepticism are not mutually exclusive (which, of course, they are). Such arguments fail to sufficiently consider the human mind's ability to hold simultaneous contradictory thoughts, a richness in consciousness lost on adherents of either extreme.

(...At least, this is the fairy tale I chose to entertain belief in for the purposes of getting on with the bulk of humanity, whom I would otherwise be obliged to classify as the peers of gophers, which may even be true but keeping it too high in mind can lead one to behaving like a prick.)

I could only accept the proposition that religiosity equals idiocy if I believed that the search for truth was inbued in every human being without discrimination. Seeing as how this is clearly not the case, I am forced to accept that the intellect may be used for purposes other than critically processing the universe.

Speaking of which...have you tried prayer? I hear that works...

It might work on the mother, if her belief were earnest enough. A worthy application of fairy tales if ever there was one.


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
Well, yeah by Man (2.00 / 0) #65 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 11:02:55 AM EST
It's a trollish comment. It's mostly just that those who yell most loudly about the religious wingnuttery of religion B tend to be religious wingnuts of religion A.

Philosophically speaking I'm willing to admit that there are certain flavors of religiousity that at least point them in the spaces between facts rather than directly contradicting them. I prefer that as the those sorts tend not intrude in my space.

[ Parent ]
Don't Mind Me, I'm Crafting A New Faith. by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #67 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 11:09:51 AM EST
I've been crystallizing my counter thoughts to the American Religion (Western Supremacy/Materialism/Binary Morality/Victorian Progress/Star Trek) as the founding of a Canadian Religion.

This religion, drawn from the essence of the Canadian national condition, is one in which all kinds of black and white are exchanged for shades of grey, even when the black or white option are clearly true. This is also known as the Infinite Variety of Perspective Theory, or Everybody's Always Wrong About Everything (TM).

In contrast to the aggressiveness and righteousness of Orthodox Americana, adherents of the Canadian religion are certain that everyone involved in any situation has an equal chance of being completely wrong. With this understanding comes the peace of absurdity.

To this end, I must imagine ways to legitimize non-sceptical thought. You can't have a religion without it.


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
that sounds like academic relativism by MillMan (4.00 / 1) #87 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 02:57:35 PM EST
ob "looks good in theory." I spend some of my free time trying to figure out how to get rid of all the extremely driven sociopaths who populate most boardrooms and political offices. Unfortunately the best thing I've come up with is akin to eugenics and well, that didn't turn out so great last time.

I never really considered face-to-face contact a possible thing. -CRwM

[ Parent ]
In Theory, Communism Works. IN THEORY. by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 2) #88 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 03:04:07 PM EST
The thing about academic relativism is that is fails to secure itself in the hearts and minds of the common people the way a good religion should, like, say Scientology or Mormonism or Neoconservativism or Star Trek.

Also, I do not believe academic relativism has a mascot. Religions need mascots. Graven idols, if you will. Despite what the rules may say they're pretty much mandatory in one form or another.

And songs. Religions need songs. Academic relativists make notoriously poor singers, I've heard, especially when they're being pedantic near the speed of light.


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
+1 Scrabble, -1 Sea lions... by atreides (4.00 / 1) #46 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 09:03:03 AM EST
Jeebus, I hate those fucking barking seals. How many times I wished for a club...

Sorry. Flashbacks of Monterey... Nothing to see here.

Have you seen The Passion yet? Here's a spoiler for you: Jesus dies.
"...compassion is more than a 16 point word in scrabble." - MostlyHarmless


Littlestar's Cousins... by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #52 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 10:11:55 AM EST
...are moving to Newfoundland&Labrador. Want us to ask them to club a few while for ya?

For those of you not in the know, Newfoundland&Labrador is the seal cruelty and cod harassment capital of Canader, a beautiful treeless wasteland of historic abandoned homes and people who can sing even when they're drunk, even if you don't want them to.

Please specify your dead seal colour of choice:
a) brown
b) grey
c) white
d) camouflage


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
Brown! A thousand times BROWN!!! by atreides (4.00 / 1) #59 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 10:43:34 AM EST
Need WorsTereshire sauce...

Have you seen The Passion yet? Here's a spoiler for you: Jesus dies.
"...compassion is more than a 16 point word in scrabble." - MostlyHarmless


[ Parent ]
Racist. by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 1) #64 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 11:02:09 AM EST
Classist. by atreides (4.00 / 1) #72 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 11:44:49 AM EST
No, not you... Me. I'm classist. I only dislike people based on their lack of social standing, thankyouverymuch.

Have you seen The Passion yet? Here's a spoiler for you: Jesus dies.
"...compassion is more than a 16 point word in scrabble." - MostlyHarmless


[ Parent ]
Scrabble: by komet (4.00 / 4) #47 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 09:10:14 AM EST
OMG N00B. You haven't lived until you've played a game of pentalingual Scrabble, where nobody at the table speaks more than three of the five permitted languages. The continual arguing is the fun part of Scrabble, putting down the letters is just a pretext for having protracted multilingual shouting matches. Oh, and you have to drink shots according to the number of points.

--
<ni> komet: You are functionally illiterate as regards trashy erotica.
Eh? by ambrosen (2.00 / 0) #70 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 11:43:04 AM EST
You drink 107 shots if you get INQUIRED going down from the centre square (happened in the last game I played)?

[ Parent ]
Almost by komet (2.00 / 0) #74 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 11:50:32 AM EST
Usually it's something like a shot for any long word, multiplied by 2 or 3 if you have a double or triple square.

Another interesting feature is that you can validly connect several words in German. It's not uncommon in German scrabble to get 16 or 17 letter words on the board.

--
<ni> komet: You are functionally illiterate as regards trashy erotica.

[ Parent ]
That's pretty good going. by ambrosen (4.00 / 1) #75 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 11:53:10 AM EST
You are on a standard 15×15 board, aren't you?

[ Parent ]
it's 15x15? by komet (2.00 / 0) #76 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 12:00:01 PM EST
Shit, I thought it was 17x17. Anyway, I clearly recall words spanning the width of the board. Only ever German ones, though.

--
<ni> komet: You are functionally illiterate as regards trashy erotica.
[ Parent ]
Hey, there. by blixco (4.00 / 1) #60 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 10:44:24 AM EST
Is there a form of banal and non-threatening conversation that would not result in a beating?

Good to hear from you.  I hope your new baby hits the deck soon, and the job settles in, and the people who adore your work yet happen to be assholes stop writing, and I hope for the love of all that is, that you are right about muslims.

In re: black people, it's not a skin thing, it's a socioeconomic thing.  When modern brutality outpaces the ability of poor countries to defend, those who can afford the machete armies will inevitably become greedy for the sort of blood we now know is shed every day in parts of Africa.
---------------------------------
I am ten ninjas. Ten ninjas with root access. - mrgoat

"Some People Are Just Born Crazies" by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 1) #82 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 01:43:01 PM EST
re: black people, it's not a skin thing, it's a socioeconomic thing.

That can't be the whole story -- kids all over the West don't strive to dress, talk and/or sing like white poor people. Or even Hispanic ones, who are reputed to be quite musical (what with their limber pelvises and Equatorial propensity for shiftlessness and lust).

No, the cellar wisdom has taught me that there must be something deeper behind it, yeah. It's in the genes, which both bless and damn. Wonderful athletes, poor politicians. Superb dancers, subpar philosophers. It's like a yinyang thing where the West is always the yangiest.

For the record, the cellar philosopher admits the role of socioeconomic context into his theories, for it is the blighted mind of the downtrodden man which becomes incapable of higher thought, ripe for combing into a fiercer shape by any pimp or imam who should wander by. The tyranny of "Arabian" theocracies has bred a citizen for whom violent radical acts are in the blood, beyond redemption, a decentralized army of egocentricists and mediaeval murderers. And, once begin down the dark path, forever will it dominate your destiny. So, once you're tainted you're pretty much fuxx0red.

These are the people "taking over" Europe right now. And, if we're not careful, they will soon be "taking over" in Holy America, too. They already have a foothold in soft-hearted Canada, which, if you recall from previous sermons, has already been established to be doomed since it is already "irretrievably European."

In the spirit of full doublethink it must also be kept in mind that any theory about the behavior of a civilization, culture or subculture which relies "socioeconomic excuses" is obviously the hook-line-and-sinker swallowed propaganda of the LIBERAL MEDIA, a spacestation powerful enough to destroy an entire planet...


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
Damn you Cheeseburger Brown! by ambrosen (2.00 / 0) #73 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 11:48:31 AM EST
You preëmpted my doing a nice little online Scrabble server and announcing it for HuSite use. I was thinking of doing it for an AJAX learning project, and also because I really want to play Scrabble with several people who I don't see face to face too often.

Anyway, it'd all be hush-hush, what with Hasbro's copyright lawyers watching.

okay... by LilFlightTest (2.00 / 0) #77 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 12:00:48 PM EST
i'll be waiting for the phone to ring...
Send me to Austria!
So... by DullTrev (4.00 / 2) #80 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 01:10:59 PM EST

Had the baby yet?

I only dare to ask that as there is a vast ocean between us. No, I don't mean metaphorically.

Randomness: How you feel about the Olympics is how I feel about almost every single conversation a colleague tries to start with me. I don't care about The Apprentice, I don't care about Big Brother (the tv show, not the personification of the government in the iconic novel 1984), I don't even care that she got engaged. I mean, I'm glad for her in a kind of generalised goodwill to all mankind way, but in specific, I don't care.

The only thing I did care about was when she told me she was pregnant. And then only because it means I'll get at least 6 months without her conversation.

I'm a shrivelled, hollow excuse for a human being.


--
DFJ?
Spare Me TV Chat, SVP by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 1) #81 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 01:31:36 PM EST
I'm a shrivelled, hollow excuse for a human being.

Maybe, but you're hilarious.

About TV chat: I know just what you mean. No matter what I do, I just can't seem to get the knack of watching popular television shows. Somehow I always fail it when it comes to chatting about the latest death-porn cop drama, reality-based debasement or rumour of somebody's tits on a stolen mobile.

I'm also out of touch with pop music and video games. I'm square, I reckon.


I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]
It's hip to be a square by DullTrev (2.00 / 0) #90 Mon Feb 20, 2006 at 03:07:45 PM EST

I consider myself not to be "down" with the "kids", or otherwise not "hip". I believe this is a consequence of having more intelligence than a piece of lawn furniture.


--
DFJ?
[ Parent ]
Never play scrabble with me by nebbish (4.00 / 1) #97 Tue Feb 21, 2006 at 12:39:17 AM EST
I say those three things during every game. I also suck really badly. The one time I won I crowed about it for weeks. I can even remember when it was - November 2004.

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It's political correctness gone mad!

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