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By Herring (Thu Dec 14, 2006 at 11:31:48 PM EST) cheese (all tags)
But not much stuff


I am heartened by the number of people who like cheese.

I have nothing to say about the BAE thing. Except fuuuuuuuuuuuck.

And the police interviewing the Prime Minister. That's a thing.

Nothing about Cricket today.

The management have, surprisingly, seen the wisdom of not rolling out a new release of the system late next week. I'm not on call, but some poor bastard is.

I have very little to say today.

< Another Semester Done | BBC White season: 'Rivers of Blood' >
Things | 31 comments (31 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
BAE by nebbish (4.00 / 3) #1 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 12:11:26 AM EST
Obviously the PM was concerned there were still people around who thought he had an ounce of integrity.

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It's political correctness gone mad!

Fuck knows who by Herring (4.00 / 2) #3 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 12:26:25 AM EST
And on the same day when he's been the only ever PM ever to be questioned by the police while in office (as the subject of an investigation that is).

After all the other shit, it looks like he might just be going down for the crappy honours thing. Reminds me of Al Capone getting done for tax evasion.

christ, we're all old now - StackyMcRacky

[ Parent ]
Term limits are good for saving politicians by cam (2.00 / 0) #11 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 02:13:04 AM EST
from themselves. Au doesnt have term limits, but NSW has ICAC - the Independent Commission Against Corruption, which has retired two Premiers (Greiner & Carr) by being on their tail for corruption.

cam
Freedom, liberty, equity and an Australian Republic

[ Parent ]
Term limits by yicky yacky (4.00 / 2) #13 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 03:11:57 AM EST

also allow leaders and parties to avoid taking a long-term view of things.


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Vacuity abhors a vacuum.
[ Parent ]
Or vice versa by Vulch (2.00 / 0) #18 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 03:43:14 AM EST

The term limit can encourage them to take a long term view because they don't have to worry about the next election.

[ Parent ]
Parliamentary leaders hang around about by cam (2.00 / 0) #26 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 05:59:09 AM EST
10 years on average - outside of exceptions like Menzies and Whitlam. Two term limits of eight years (or three term limits at three years a pop) are just under the average of 10 years - and it usually in the third term or after eight years that the corruption from the previous eight is inescapable. I think it works for the executive in both parliamentary and presidential systems. Carr got chased out after ten years by ICAC and Greiner after two. Howard has things bobbing up now pretty constantly.

For the legislative I think they should have a generational term limit of 25 years. But eight years or two terms is good for the executive - especially in this day and age of an over-strong executive.

cam
Freedom, liberty, equity and an Australian Republic

[ Parent ]
By Greiner two by cam (2.00 / 0) #27 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 06:00:11 AM EST
I meant two terms, he was in power for six years as Premier.

cam
Freedom, liberty, equity and an Australian Republic

[ Parent ]
so you're really arguing for by martingale (4.00 / 1) #29 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 02:16:46 PM EST
stronger anti-corruption units, rather than term limits? It sort of seems inefficient to throw people out on a technicality though, kind of like charging Al Capone with tax evasion.

I'd like to see what it's like to have two heads of state, or three or four (and I'm not talking about three ceremonial ones and one éminence grise). One of the nice things with the EU is that the rules are so egalitarian between states that it's hard to get agreement on major issues. Freedom by lack of progress, so to speak :)
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$E(X_t|F_s) = X_s,\quad t > s$

[ Parent ]
No I am arguing for term limits by cam (4.00 / 1) #30 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 04:34:42 PM EST
but ICAC changed the political culture in NSW. I would like to see all states and the feds have ICAC (which is an independent body outside of ministerial control).

Term limits are a good thing IMO.

cam
Freedom, liberty, equity and an Australian Republic

[ Parent ]
Pragmatic view by jump the ladder (4.00 / 1) #20 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 04:02:45 AM EST
Lots of jobs at stake, old history, Saudi Arabia is too powerful to fuck off.

Bribing to get an arms deal in the Middle East, who'd have though, eh...

[ Parent ]
Yes, but by Herring (2.00 / 0) #21 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 04:20:48 AM EST
Why waste 2 years of police time on the investigation first?

The rationale "if we don't sell arms to these bastards, someone else will" could also be applied to, say, crack cocaine. Except that crack doesn't kill nearly so many people.

It's a shame that the only real manufacturing in this country is weapons (and, probably, crack cocaine).

christ, we're all old now - StackyMcRacky

[ Parent ]
If we don't sell them the Typhoon by jump the ladder (2.00 / 0) #22 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 04:45:48 AM EST
Then the French will sell them the Rafale argument clinches it for me.

[ Parent ]
Good argument by Herring (4.00 / 1) #23 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 04:56:47 AM EST
If we don't sell arms to the Taliban, Columbian drug cartels, Al Qaeda and Daily Express readers then someone else will.

christ, we're all old now - StackyMcRacky
[ Parent ]
True by nebbish (2.00 / 0) #28 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 06:58:53 AM EST
Rule of law though. I get nervous when politicians override it.

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It's political correctness gone mad!

[ Parent ]
To Be Honest by jump the ladder (4.00 / 1) #31 Sun Dec 17, 2006 at 06:27:44 AM EST
This decision is this least of Tony's scams and dishonesty. He's totally discredited everywhere now.

[ Parent ]
WIPO by anonimouse (2.00 / 0) #2 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 12:15:34 AM EST
Dervla Kirwan
or maybe one of the All Saints.


Girls come and go but a mortgage is for 25 years -- JtL
For you I pick by Herring (4.00 / 1) #7 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 12:51:13 AM EST
Janet Street Porter.

Remember this is a voice for narration. I am surprised you wouldn't go for Frostrup or possibly Charlotte Green.

christ, we're all old now - StackyMcRacky

[ Parent ]
Nooooooooooo! by anonimouse (2.00 / 0) #8 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 12:54:10 AM EST
Dooooomed.

If I want someone who sounds like a fishwife I'll have Charlotte Church


Girls come and go but a mortgage is for 25 years -- JtL
[ Parent ]
I'm sure you'd love to have Charlotte Church (n/t) by Cloaked User (4.00 / 1) #17 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 03:21:07 AM EST



--
This is not a psychotic episode. It is a cleansing moment of clarity.
[ Parent ]
Toksvig by yicky yacky (4.00 / 1) #12 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 03:09:29 AM EST

would suit him quite well, I think.


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Vacuity abhors a vacuum.
[ Parent ]
Leslie Phillips [n/t] by Herring (4.00 / 1) #16 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 03:19:57 AM EST


christ, we're all old now - StackyMcRacky
[ Parent ]
s/Phillips/Grantham [n/t] by Herring (4.00 / 2) #19 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 03:56:58 AM EST


christ, we're all old now - StackyMcRacky
[ Parent ]
Frostrup by anonimouse (2.00 / 0) #15 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 03:19:00 AM EST
Sounds a bit harsh, I prefer a sound that melts in the ears.

Girls come and go but a mortgage is for 25 years -- JtL
[ Parent ]
Richard Dean Anderson by gazbo (4.00 / 1) #4 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 12:30:08 AM EST
Not for any clever reason.  He just makes me feel all funny and confused.

I recommend always assuming 7th normal form where items in a text column are not allowed to rhyme.

After I wrote the poll by Herring (2.00 / 0) #6 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 12:38:48 AM EST
I did think of some good extra options. I am too fucking idle to edit though.

Frank Kelly (Father Jack)


christ, we're all old now - StackyMcRacky

[ Parent ]
WIPO by TurboThy (4.00 / 1) #5 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 12:32:17 AM EST
David Attenborough or Stephen Hawkings.
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Sommerhus til salg, første række til Kattegat.
WIPO by ambrosen (4.00 / 1) #9 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 01:24:42 AM EST
Adrian Chiles. For the Brumminess.

Or Jonathan Meade because he's my favourite documentary maker. Well, I like Jon Ronson, but he's got a weedy voice.

OMPI by martingale (4.00 / 3) #10 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 01:34:20 AM EST
Dalek
--
$E(X_t|F_s) = X_s,\quad t > s$
people who like cheese. by wiredog (4.00 / 1) #14 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 03:14:25 AM EST
That reminds me, I've got to swing by the local gourmet grocery store tomorrow to pick up some cheese to take to Utah for Dad, over Christmas. He likes cheese and the small town he lives in has a very limited selection. Gonna get some cheshire, stilton, a two year aged gouda (wonderful stuff) and other stuff.

Earth First!
(We can strip mine the rest later.)

Get something smelly by ad hoc (2.00 / 0) #24 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 05:33:36 AM EST
Odd by Herring (2.00 / 0) #25 Fri Dec 15, 2006 at 05:40:15 AM EST
We've just had the MD and the "executive board" come round and serve us tea and biccies. Dressed in santa costumes (as opposed to satan costumes). Then they sang a verse of "we wish you a merry christmas".

I'd still prefer a large pay rise.

christ, we're all old now - StackyMcRacky

Things | 31 comments (31 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback