Shakespeare is iconic because

He's objectively a great writer   4 votes - 80 %
He came along at a fortuitous time   5 votes - 100 %
He had critics championing him   2 votes - 40 %
He's been re-written and re-interpreted   2 votes - 40 %
Critics changed their standards to make him great   2 votes - 40 %
WIPO   0 votes - 0 %
 
5 Total Votes
Empire of Time by wiredog (4.00 / 1) #1 Wed Oct 18, 2017 at 07:40:53 AM EST
“they can take doomed people without affecting the timeline.”
Millenium used that trope well.

Earth First!
(We can strip mine the rest later.)

squirrels by sasquatchan (4.00 / 1) #2 Wed Oct 18, 2017 at 10:06:30 AM EST
are the right, proper and correct protein for Brunswick stew. 

Around here, you could easily get your bag limit (6), but you'll need more than that for a pie or stew.

Irregular prose by ucblockhead (4.00 / 2) #3 Wed Oct 18, 2017 at 01:58:31 PM EST
I suspect that the changes in language and accent means that moderns just can't see this like Shakespeare's contemporaries would.  While Elizabethan English isn't a huge stretch, it still takes effort and practice to learn its rhythms.  We don't understand it like native speakers would.  And of course the accent it is read in now is not at all like the accent is was originally staged with.
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[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
Possibly by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #4 Wed Oct 18, 2017 at 08:06:14 PM EST
Shakespeare's near contemporaries complained about him adding extra syllables that don't fit the meter. IIRC there was something similar with Basho in Japan, he also broke the regularity of the meter which contemporaries complained about but moderns accept.

If you're use modern pronunciation it gets even more irregular of course, but some actors maintain old pronunciation when it helps. E.g. Richard III sometimes says "I am de-ter-min-ed to prove a villain" which still adds an extra syllable but doesn't break the pattern of stresses.

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It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?

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Running faster by lm (4.00 / 1) #5 Thu Oct 19, 2017 at 06:59:38 AM EST
Do you do speed work at all (sprint intervals, hill repeats, etc.)?

If not, that's how you get faster. Do speed work once per week.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
Likewise by Scrymarch (4.00 / 1) #6 Thu Oct 19, 2017 at 07:48:01 AM EST
I found running plateaus at a certain point, until you do more running or other exercise in a week.

I've been finding Jay Johnson's core work and mobile stretching a useful complement that doesn't take too much time.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJo7_MiRLkU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5-2gUAOnrco

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Mobility work is always great by lm (4.00 / 1) #7 Thu Oct 19, 2017 at 09:45:45 PM EST
Not enough programs take it seriously.

But when it comes to speed, I've found three things invaluable in increasing my pace.

  1. Dedicated speed work, the aforementioned hill repeats, etc.
  2. Swimming. Doing laps does wonders for cardio capcity.
  3. Walk/run methodology such as the Galloway method.
The last of these only applies to long distance running.

But the older I get the more that mobility work helps me in daily life when I'm not running. It's almost unbelievable how much less sore I am when I do mobility work regularly.

Likewaise, proper core work. It helps prevent injury more so than it helps getting faster.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
Good ideas by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #8 Fri Oct 20, 2017 at 02:12:24 AM EST
I'll definitely try some interval stuff.
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It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?
[ Parent ]
I should try more swimming by Scrymarch (4.00 / 1) #9 Fri Oct 20, 2017 at 10:18:30 AM EST
I should have said I've never had much seriousness or success in training for speed.

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I'm lucky by lm (4.00 / 2) #10 Sat Oct 21, 2017 at 06:56:50 AM EST
There's a USAT (USA Triathlon) certified coach that does weekly group lessons for triathletes at a local pool. Every 7 week session he changes the focus up a bit. Sometimes we work heavily on form and technique. Other times on endurance. Other times on speed. It's helped my cardio out tremendously. And it's a municipal pool so the price is insanely cheap compared to the quality of the coaching.

But even before I started that this past year, I noticed almost right away that when I started swimming laps regularly, it got a whole lot easier to maintain a quicker pace over distance when I run.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
other notes by gzt (4.00 / 1) #11 Sat Oct 21, 2017 at 01:15:00 PM EST
  • most of one's running (80+%) should be done at a slow pace so for the most part speeding up in an everyday run is neither desirable nor helpful
  • another thing that helps with aerobic development is to have one long run per week, perhaps about twice as long as your typical daily run, done at a nice slow pace


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+1 long run by Scrymarch (4.00 / 1) #12 Sun Oct 22, 2017 at 02:40:08 AM EST
I also find this useful from a mental health / don't be an arsehole perspective.

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