UKIP?

Yes   2 votes - 66 %
No I prefer the cosy cartel of centre left paedophile protectors and expense fraudsters.   1 vote - 33 %
 
3 Total Votes
It was illuminating to say the least. by Breaker (4.00 / 1) #1 Fri Oct 10, 2014 at 12:41:04 PM EST
Not least the media reaction to it all.  I particularly loved the smear campaigns from the Graun and the Torygraph et al were swiftly rebuffed in the comments section.

Roll on May![1]

[1] The month in 2015, not the Cabinet Minister.


Unfortunately by gmd (4.00 / 2) #10 Fri Oct 10, 2014 at 04:43:15 PM EST
 Due to joining the resistance, I'm unable to enjoy the media circus surrounding this happy day.




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gmd - HuSi's second most dimwitted overprivileged user.
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an interesting and informative take, by the mariner (4.00 / 3) #2 Fri Oct 10, 2014 at 12:45:06 PM EST
but i have to admit that reading about UK politics, to me, is a bit like watching a cricket match, except with english players instead of indian ones.

could you contextualize the importance of "the people'a army's" gains in this election for someone who isn't well-versed in the unique political culture of the UK?

Bad news for established parties by anonimouse (4.00 / 2) #3 Fri Oct 10, 2014 at 03:36:49 PM EST
 The election result in Clacton wasn't much of a surprise. As far as the. Conservatives go the Rochester result in a few weeks time will be morerelates an relevant as this will see whether a less popular MP can get in simply by being a Ukip candidate instead of Conservative. If he does then expect a few more MPs to leave the Tory ship.

The Manchester result was a big surprise though and shows that Ukip can potentially win seats from both parties. It also shows that the voters are not that thrilled by Ed Milliband and there is a possibility of a leadership change.

Girls come and go but a mortgage is for 25 years -- JtL
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interesting, by the mariner (2.00 / 0) #4 Fri Oct 10, 2014 at 04:08:09 PM EST
so in your opinion as an englishman, do these results increase or decrease your confidence in the continued dominance of UK politics by lizards disguised as human beings?

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I'd like to hopeful by gmd (4.00 / 1) #6 Fri Oct 10, 2014 at 04:28:03 PM EST
 But if I'm being realistic, UKIP will have been lizard infested from day 1. The acid test is whether they support the ongoing Palestinian genocide or not. Lizard dominated parties are generally in favour,

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gmd - HuSi's second most dimwitted overprivileged user.
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just to clarify, by the mariner (2.00 / 0) #7 Fri Oct 10, 2014 at 04:34:57 PM EST
i'm a bit confused by what appears to be a grammatical error in your first sentence. are you for or against continued domination of UK politics by lizards?

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No grammatical error at all. by gmd (4.00 / 1) #9 Fri Oct 10, 2014 at 04:40:49 PM EST
Just standard conversational English.

for the record I'm not against the lizard per-se, just against their hidden machinations. If a shapeshifter does not initiate force against me I'm happy to let them get on with their lower forth dimensional life.


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gmd - HuSi's second most dimwitted overprivileged user.
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an appropriately guarded response. by the mariner (4.00 / 1) #11 Fri Oct 10, 2014 at 04:43:17 PM EST


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My grammatical breakdown by anonimouse (2.00 / 0) #17 Sat Oct 11, 2014 at 03:52:52 AM EST
...was caused by answering on a tablet in bed. 

Girls come and go but a mortgage is for 25 years -- JtL
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Not sure what you're saying here by Breaker (2.00 / 0) #8 Fri Oct 10, 2014 at 04:40:19 PM EST
Are lizards lizards pro or anti Palestinian?

Also, was Enoch Powell a lizard?


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you're not understanding the lizard perspective by the mariner (4.00 / 1) #12 Fri Oct 10, 2014 at 04:48:15 PM EST
lizards are from the fourth dimension. your physical universe looks to a lizard like a sheet of paper looks to you. accordingly, all humans, palestinian or otherwise, appear to be little more than thin slices of meat, bologna, say, to a lizard.

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It's true we are like cattle to them. by gmd (2.00 / 0) #13 Fri Oct 10, 2014 at 04:52:43 PM EST
 They farm us for energy.

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gmd - HuSi's second most dimwitted overprivileged user.
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exactly. by the mariner (4.00 / 1) #14 Fri Oct 10, 2014 at 04:55:42 PM EST
to a lizard, the important thing is the density of human suffering. to say that lizards are pro- or anti-palestinian is to miss the point, which is that the current situation vis-a-vis israel-palestine offers an excellent value proposition.

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Uk politics is very tribal. by gmd (4.00 / 2) #5 Fri Oct 10, 2014 at 04:23:47 PM EST
The class system has informed the way people vote for a long time, almost regardless of whatever actual policy any particular party enacted. For the most part though, the two mainstream centre left parties, labour and conservative, represented the interests of their voters at least to some degree.

The rot started in 1973 when the British public were tricked by the paedophile murderer Ted Heath into joining the then EEC, a precursor to the EU (a Soviet style in democratic supra-national entity riddled with corruption and waste, with a neo-Marxist ideology). Having been informed it was a trading bloc, many British people were dismayed at the loss of sovereignty and huge expenses as the EU mutated into a country, with a parliament, a national anthem and open borders between states.

It was the Blair/Brown years where the current political earthquake has it's origins. The neo-Marxists in the Labour Party (the so called party of the working class) mounted a systemic attack on the very people who put them in office.

Meanwhile the Conservative party (traditionally considered the more right wing, and nationalistic of Britians two main Socialist parties) were busy destroying their own support base.

So you have a huge number of disaffected voters from both left and right, who have woken up to the fact that the parties who supposedly represent them actually despise them and their views, seeing through the rhetoric that casts UKIP as 'racist' and deciding that they cannot possibly be any worse than the current bunch of criminal scumbags in power, and thus voting for Britain's equivalent of the Swiss SVP.

the voters are starting to use their brains for a change instead of voting along tribal lines.

interesting times indeed.



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gmd - HuSi's second most dimwitted overprivileged user.
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There is also by Breaker (4.00 / 1) #15 Fri Oct 10, 2014 at 05:26:59 PM EST
Severe misconduct in public office from both of the main established parties, be it the awful failure of Staffordshire Hospital and yet Labour trying to claim ownership of the "NHS is safe in our hands" soundbite when it clearly wasn't - they were in charge when the NHS was busy killing your granny.

Or perjuring themselves to the courts.

Recently popular but now hugely deflated, the 3rd party that usually receives the protest vote from those that can be arsed to rock up to the voting booth and not spoil their ballot paper - the Lib Dems.

In case you think I'm being partisan, they're "all in it together".  All in in jail together.

But let's not forget the utter bastardry of Rotherham.

Even when caught out they do not resign.  This is what 13 years of political and social vandalism the New Labour under Tony Blair brought us.  But hey, "lessons will be learned". 

Just not the ones us taxpayers want hammered into our political class.

Peter Oborne, a rightish wing journalist wrote a great book about our new politicians.  He lays into every political party, however.

There's complicity from the media; how many of you have read of Elm House scandals?  Anna Raccoon was actually at the school at the time and has a different take on the events there.  Incidentally if you have a strong constitution I'd advise spending some time on that site.  No mention of lizards but plenty to worry about.  Anna writes well and has some first hand experience of Elm House, as does John Ward.

How's that Chilcott enquiry going, Boris?  Five years in and still no final report?

In short, all political parties that have been in office in the last 20-30 years or so have been utter shitbags, paedo's, crooks, warmongers and whatever else they've got away with.

Media complicity and an unenquiring public have shielded them so far, but there are blogs out there now that do read the reports, that do do the analysis and every now and then something breaks through into the mass subconscience and we realise that the political class we have over here in UKia are no longer interested in public service, but personal enrichment at best.

You get the occasional good egg in Parliament- Frank Field, Douglas Carswell, Kate Hoey...  But they are few in the 650 MPs that rule us.

The trouble is that with t'internets, the coverups and bits that are quietly airbrushed from the media that informs public opinion are becoming harder to conceal.

Ask your friends - did you know that Germany has had days of civil unrest?  That one was quietly reported by main news outlets over here and I have yet to see any serious TV coverage.

So, enter UKIP.  A cleaner skin in a filthy world.  Is it any wonder that people are thinking "well, they can't be worse than the rest of them, and the smear campaigns run by pocketed media interests are mostly lies anyway?"

And dmg is right; interesting times indeed.


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Exactly. by gmd (2.00 / 0) #16 Fri Oct 10, 2014 at 06:43:01 PM EST
I've said it before, but I'll say it again: British establishment is rotten to the core. 






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gmd - HuSi's second most dimwitted overprivileged user.
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UK Politics by jimgon (2.00 / 0) #18 Sat Oct 11, 2014 at 08:49:49 AM EST
 They really aren't that much different than American politics. Don't focus on the party names, but on their philosophies.  




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Technician - "We can't even get decent physical health care. Mental health is like witchcraft here."
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