Ballet?

Good   2 votes - 40 %
Bad   3 votes - 60 %
 
5 Total Votes
suck.com? by ucblockhead (4.00 / 1) #1 Tue Apr 10, 2012 at 03:35:18 PM EST
Wow, that brings back memories!

I'm impressed that they've refused to sell the domain for so long.
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[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman

The 1990s revival is in full swing! by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #2 Tue Apr 10, 2012 at 03:51:41 PM EST
I passed a stall in trendy Camden Market the other day proudly advertising vintage Nineties clothing.
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It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?
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i just found out that my firm considers suck.com by nathan (4.00 / 1) #7 Wed Apr 11, 2012 at 10:51:23 AM EST
"Unacceptable Use."

LOL, better not try to surf to f*ckedcompany

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Perhaps by ucblockhead (4.00 / 1) #10 Wed Apr 11, 2012 at 09:03:15 PM EST
Cynicism is considered dangerous to the company.
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[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
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We're lawyers by nathan (4.00 / 2) #11 Wed Apr 11, 2012 at 10:10:27 PM EST

No one wants Pollyanna for a lawyer. Unless you work in civil rights, insufficient cynicism is grounds for getting disbarred.



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Fascinating economics links as always... by Metatone (4.00 / 4) #3 Wed Apr 11, 2012 at 05:01:20 AM EST
The Gig Economy echoes research I was doing nearly 10 years ago now. Interesting to see that I was reading the signs correctly. It should make many economists stop and think, but I don't think they are any more ready now than they were then to grapple with the notion of involuntary under-employment. It causes too many complications.

Incentive bubble is a great essay. It has many points in common with Roger Martin's "Fixing the Game." I think it's a bit weaker on remedies all around though. He dismisses public blunt instruments (taxes, regulation) too lightly. Engineering for complexity in other fields teaches us that one route to safety is blunt - safety margin, reinforcement and an exchange of some efficiency for some robustness/resilience. Instead he expresses preference for private blunt instruments (changed managerial oversight and pension fund assessment) but not only are those still blunt instruments, but there are few ways to encourage them. At least in principle, tax and regulation policy can be changed directly through the democratic process. Changing the ways private actors do their oversight is much more "action at a distance..."

Tyler Cowen frustrates me. He's like Malcolm Gladwell. Very smart, always spotting new and interesting observations. And then somehow he doesn't follow up. He posits all these changes in technology and then doesn't seem to think they'll affect energy usage patterns or location decisions. I think he presents good reasons to expect a short term manufacturing resurgence in the USA, but his long term analysis seems to rest on fracking not being (to use his term) low hanging fruit, which is a big assumption and alternative energy sources (nuclear, wind, solar) not being industrially viable - which in the long term seems odd.

Don't get me started on his persistent misreading of income stats, but if manufacturing productivity is going to rise then it will push society even more toward 1% (instead of his mooted 10%) at which point I think there will be big upheavals in the structure of economies around the world. The dynamic export sectors of Thailand and even Germany are socially sustainable while people think they can get in on the action - as that kind of "social mobility" recedes, lots of things change politically.



inner acropolis vs. inner citidel by lm (4.00 / 1) #4 Wed Apr 11, 2012 at 07:16:42 AM EST
I think both words are problematic for most of us in this day and age. Neither gets used much and when they do get used, they tend to get used in a strict, narrow, and technical sense that is unlikely to capture the fullness of the Greek.

Part of this is that few modern cities are built defensively. I take your idea to mean that the reference is to defensible high place at the city's core that functions as a city center for worship and other activities during times of peace. There simply isn't anything comparable in the experience of most people in the industrialized world. We do have city centers still. But, generally speaking, they're the last place to go in times of strife.

Probably the closest thing these days is a sports stadium.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
Therefore by Scrymarch (4.00 / 2) #5 Wed Apr 11, 2012 at 10:02:40 AM EST
... the mind which is free of passions is a Wembley ...


Iambic Web Certified

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Replaced by gated HOAs. by ammoniacal (4.00 / 1) #6 Wed Apr 11, 2012 at 10:20:36 AM EST

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

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Superdome, the new acropolis <no taste> by wumpus (4.00 / 2) #8 Wed Apr 11, 2012 at 01:59:32 PM EST


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I briefly thought about making that comparison by lm (4.00 / 2) #9 Wed Apr 11, 2012 at 06:48:43 PM EST
Post-Katrina Superdome and the fictionalized Wembley Stadium in 28 Weeks Later were the two locations I had in mind when I wrote that.

There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
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