Do people ever try to persuade you of hopelessly wrong positions?

Yes, which is why I carry a pistol.   1 vote - 11 %
Yes, but only on the Internet.   1 vote - 11 %
Yes, but I quickly change the subject.   4 votes - 44 %
Yes, but I am a patient educator.   0 votes - 0 %
No, but all viewpoints have an underlying validity anyways.   1 vote - 11 %
No, and most of those things you listed as "facts" are bullshit only sheeple believe.   0 votes - 0 %
No, people know better than to engage the merciless blade of my ultra-cunning intellectual ninjitsu.   0 votes - 0 %
No, I never listen to what people say.   2 votes - 22 %
 
9 Total Votes
Peanuts are beans. by dev trash (2.00 / 0) #1 Sun Jun 05, 2011 at 02:10:40 PM EST
next you're gonna tell me that Tomatoes are fruits!

--
I DON'T CARE ABOUT YOUR BALLS! ->clock
Tomatoes are fruits by lm (2.00 / 0) #2 Sun Jun 05, 2011 at 02:35:53 PM EST
But all fruits are vegetables. Additionally, all grains are both fruits and vegetables.

There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
What sense of "vegetable" are you using? by ni (2.00 / 0) #6 Sun Jun 05, 2011 at 03:47:44 PM EST
No Tomatoes


"These days it seems like sometimes dreams of Italian hyper-gonadism are all a man's got to keep him going." -- CRwM
[ Parent ]
I mean almost any sense except for two by lm (2.00 / 0) #7 Sun Jun 05, 2011 at 04:25:18 PM EST
Or at least the only two uses of the word that immediately come to my mind that break my categoritization are the nutritionist's definition and the use of 'vegetable' to mean a person in a 'persistant vegetative state.'

And I can't say that I really understand the point of the nutritionists' definition. It seems inconsistent and counter-intuitive to me.  Aside from the issues of the grain/fruit dichotomy and the fruit/vegetable dichotomy, there is the problem of some root vegetables (potatoes, for example) outside of the fruit and vegetable category while others (such as carrots) do not.

I guess I should also allow there is a rather vague cultural sense of the word where most sweet plants are fruits and most non-sweet plants are vegetables. But I don't think that sense of the word is really relevant. It varies from culture to culture, and even from tradition to tradition within some cultures. Arguing over where the technical boundaries are is a bit like arguing over what accounts for good taste.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
Definitions by ni (4.00 / 1) #8 Sun Jun 05, 2011 at 04:54:18 PM EST
That's a lot of writing about definitions without actually answering my question.

Arguing over where the technical boundaries are is a bit like arguing over what accounts for good taste.

I don't think "vegetable" means much of anything, beyond a culinary sense where it encompasses a variety of foods sharing little in common (except perhaps that we eat them chiefly for their vitamin content). You say that you don't think there's any point to arguing over exactly what it means, which makes it sound like you probably agree with me. This is why the parent comment surprised me: I don't know any sense of vegetable in which these claims can be true (except perhaps legal ones, if they exist), but you seemed to feel it unambiguously true enough to point out.


"These days it seems like sometimes dreams of Italian hyper-gonadism are all a man's got to keep him going." -- CRwM

[ Parent ]
Fruits by tolomea (2.00 / 0) #10 Sun Jun 05, 2011 at 07:44:47 PM EST
I thought you needed to include definitions of fruit in the mix to suitably confuse people. Generally fruit and vegetables in the culinary sense are mutually exclusive, however some culinary vegetables are botanical fruits. If you are conflating these two meanings of the word fruit then tomatos will confuse you.

[ Parent ]
Thanks, but by ni (2.00 / 0) #12 Sun Jun 05, 2011 at 09:29:22 PM EST
I wasn't confused by what fruits are. I have a botany degree; I'm pretty clear on fruits. I was confused by lm being so certain about the definition of a term I'm pretty sure borders on meaningless.


"These days it seems like sometimes dreams of Italian hyper-gonadism are all a man's got to keep him going." -- CRwM
[ Parent ]
I am puzzled by your comments in this thread by lm (2.00 / 0) #48 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 03:14:44 PM EST
The only thing I can figure is that is that you're taking my remarks too seriously, as if they were something other than causal remarks made in a conversational thread.

Maybe I mijudge /dev/trash, but I suspect that he was trolling a bit. To which I replied somewhat playfuly, capitalizing on various uses of the terms in question that are pretty close to being univocal, albeit usually constrained to limited technical domains (botany, biology, metaphysics, etc.).


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
ni does that pretty regularly by infinitera (4.00 / 1) #49 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 03:57:09 PM EST
He's no fun.

[…] a professional layabout. Which I aspire to be, but am not yet. — CheeseburgerBrown

[ Parent ]
Well, it's not like I never do that by lm (2.00 / 0) #53 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 05:07:13 PM EST
Or even like I don't do that on a regular basis.

There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
You do it on a *regular* basis‽ by ambrosen (4.00 / 4) #55 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 05:38:11 PM EST
I was using the timestamps of your comments of acutest obtuse pedantism as an entropy source for my key generating program. What now?

[ Parent ]
Timestamps should be okay by lm (2.00 / 0) #61 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 09:30:16 PM EST
Just don't try to use ordinal position. You'll get cracked fo' sho'.

There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
Charmed! /nt by ni (4.00 / 1) #60 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 09:23:30 PM EST



"These days it seems like sometimes dreams of Italian hyper-gonadism are all a man's got to keep him going." -- CRwM
[ Parent ]
If 9 Out of 10 Omnivorous Five Year Boys... by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 1) #30 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 10:00:23 AM EST
Spelling Point: by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #34 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 10:22:33 AM EST
Technically, the correct plural form is "tomatiosi." Look it up. Then, when the book says otherwise, throw out the book because it's probably wrong.


Science-fiction wallah, storytelling gorilla, man wearing a hat: Cheeseburger Brown.
[ Parent ]
magnetic field by garlic (2.00 / 0) #3 Sun Jun 05, 2011 at 03:19:51 PM EST
it appears to have shifted in the past, but I don't know how long it took.


It was extremely quick by ucblockhead (2.00 / 0) #9 Sun Jun 05, 2011 at 05:43:39 PM EST
In geologic terms, "extremely quick" is hundreds of years.
---
[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
[ Parent ]
Actually by notafurry (2.00 / 0) #13 Sun Jun 05, 2011 at 10:37:36 PM EST
Studies at University of Oregon show an estimated rate as high as 6 degrees of latitude per day. Which, if sustained, would give a 180 degree shift (or considerably more than would be required to "flip" the pole) in 30 days.

My ex's new husband is a geologist. Conversations with him on this topic have been fascinating and a little disturbing - he seems very cheerful about the impact of the event if it were to occur any time soon. Then again, he is married to my ex...

[ Parent ]
What!? by ucblockhead (4.00 / 1) #14 Sun Jun 05, 2011 at 11:18:22 PM EST
Are you saying I'm stupid!?!?
---
[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
[ Parent ]
Yes. by notafurry (4.00 / 3) #15 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 12:03:28 AM EST
I'm glad we came to this understanding.

[ Parent ]
So, You Let "Big Geology" Get To You... by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #33 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 10:21:26 AM EST
Damn those handsome devils and their deadly deadly pick-axes!


Science-fiction wallah, storytelling gorilla, man wearing a hat: Cheeseburger Brown.
[ Parent ]
Elvis is dead? by wiredog (4.00 / 1) #4 Sun Jun 05, 2011 at 03:25:20 PM EST
But I saw him just last week, in Tonopah. A UFO from Area 51 dropped him off there.

Earth First!
(We can strip mine the rest later.)

Doctor Who Lives at Area 51 by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #28 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 09:58:15 AM EST
He sleeps in the Ark of the Covenant and drinks his tea from flying saucers.


Science-fiction wallah, storytelling gorilla, man wearing a hat: Cheeseburger Brown.
[ Parent ]
Bigot by Herring (4.00 / 2) #5 Sun Jun 05, 2011 at 03:42:42 PM EST
Don't you know that "stupid" is now an equally valid point of view and it deserves to be listened to.

You can't inspire people with facts
- Small Gods

I Love Stupid People by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 2) #27 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 09:57:24 AM EST
I do. I know some great ones. They're quality.

And, to be frank, it's the really classically stupid ones that are seldom a problem. They tend, on the whole, to be aware of their own limitations.

The dangerous breed is the slightly bright because their bright is too slight to recognize its relative dimness. Those are the ones that foam and fight and pull hair and go mental if they feel like they've done the world's most common thing by being a bit wrong-headed on a topic.


Science-fiction wallah, storytelling gorilla, man wearing a hat: Cheeseburger Brown.
[ Parent ]
It's the media I blame by Herring (2.00 / 0) #31 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 10:13:55 AM EST
Experienced scientists with actual evidence and studies are put up against shouty morons in the name of "balance". Often they don't bother with the scientists at all because shouty morons make better TV.

Also the media are bad at pulling people up on claims. A lot of people in the UK heard and repeated the UKIP crap about 75% (or some such high figure) of UK legislation coming from Europe. When someone looked into it, it turned out to be from a partial quote from a German regional politician whose job was implementing EU directives in his region. But like the "departing Clinton staff trash Whitehouse" story, we never get to hear the retractions - because they're boring.

You can't inspire people with facts
- Small Gods

[ Parent ]
I Unblame The Media by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 1) #35 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 10:28:31 AM EST
The chief reason why I unblame the media is because it's boring. Everyone is always blaming the media. It's the default go-to target for explaining why a very abstract thing called "people in general" is misaligned in terms of its opinions relative to the speaker.

(Which doesn't mean it isn't so...just that's too familiar and doesn't really move the plot ahead so if nothing else it's weak in a dramaturgical sense.)

Also, I unblame the media because blaming the media is a way of unblaming ourselves.


Science-fiction wallah, storytelling gorilla, man wearing a hat: Cheeseburger Brown.
[ Parent ]
But if it's not the media .... by Herring (2.00 / 0) #36 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 10:35:22 AM EST
it must be the people that's the problem. It's us <dramatic chord>.

What do we do?

You can't inspire people with facts
- Small Gods

[ Parent ]
Organize a committee of course by notafurry (4.00 / 1) #39 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 11:26:40 AM EST
I'll make the tea.

[ Parent ]
Organize? by Herring (2.00 / 0) #40 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 11:28:39 AM EST
Can't do that. Best get in some management consultants. We'll have this problem licked in no time.

You can't inspire people with facts
- Small Gods

[ Parent ]
Think whatever you want. by muchagecko (4.00 / 1) #11 Sun Jun 05, 2011 at 08:58:06 PM EST
Comparing opinions can be fun.


A purpose gives you a reason to wake up every morning.
So a purpose is like a box of powdered donut holes?
Exactly
My Name is Earl

Well, Fun Is Fun by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 2) #23 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 09:51:07 AM EST
It can't be denied that fun is fun, but a lot of people get upset when the fun doesn't go the way they'd expected.

To be sure, hats off to the debators! Make no mistake: I enjoy a good rollick in the gnosis with duelling doxia.

It's the sucks I can't stand. It's the ones that frown and pout and gather all their toys and go home, because they've been slighted by someone pointing out that their ducks aren't such an unassailable row as they'd believed.


Science-fiction wallah, storytelling gorilla, man wearing a hat: Cheeseburger Brown.
[ Parent ]
I have the solution ! by Phage (4.00 / 1) #16 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 03:44:59 AM EST
Whilst looking up Ionize on Wikipedia by anonimouse (4.00 / 1) #17 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 04:29:00 AM EST
I came across the Holstein-Herring method, which I presume involves giving a certain Husi member a beer and seeing what his opinion is...


Girls come and go but a mortgage is for 25 years -- JtL
Shurely shome mishtake by Phage (4.00 / 1) #18 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 06:47:48 AM EST
That would be Ionise ?
And Holstein-Herring I thought referred to the London cow tipping championships.

[ Parent ]
Either's fine in the UK by ambrosen (4.00 / 1) #19 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 07:38:18 AM EST
Or at least -ize is used by Oxford dictionaries, even if -ise is nearly universal amongst the general public. One to bear in mind if anyone comes at you brandishing dictionary definitions as if they were cast in stone.

[ Parent ]
Anyone by Phage (4.00 / 4) #20 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 07:45:35 AM EST
Strong enough to wield an OED made of stone is definitely someone to respect !

[ Parent ]
Hence, The Famous Last Words: by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 2) #26 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 09:54:36 AM EST
Illuminati == Eggheads keeping the Common Man down by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #21 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 07:53:31 AM EST
Otherwise, a fairly consistent piece. Polish it up and re-submit.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

Public vs. Secret Eggheads by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 1) #25 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 09:53:05 AM EST
Public eggheads in a war against the common man aren't called "Illuminati" they're called "climatologists."


Science-fiction wallah, storytelling gorilla, man wearing a hat: Cheeseburger Brown.
[ Parent ]
Have you considered the Stonecutters? by ammoniacal (4.00 / 1) #29 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 09:58:56 AM EST
ASK 1 TO B 1

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
Shh... by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 1) #32 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 10:19:23 AM EST
Dammit by Gedvondur (4.00 / 2) #22 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 09:49:38 AM EST
Super disappointed in this one:

"The Coriolis effect is orders of magnitude too weak to influence the direction of a sink's drainage."

I WANT TO BELIEVE.

"Adrenaline dumbs pain" - xth
My Step-Father... by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 1) #24 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 09:52:01 AM EST
...is a PhD and he still can't grok the truth of it. He's known his "fact" so for long it's grown in.


Science-fiction wallah, storytelling gorilla, man wearing a hat: Cheeseburger Brown.
[ Parent ]
amazing. by gzt (2.00 / 0) #41 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 11:30:54 AM EST
does he ever watch the tub or the sink? it drains anticlockwise only about half the time...

[ Parent ]
I am tempted by Herring (2.00 / 0) #42 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 11:33:14 AM EST
to buy a house exactly on the equator and modify the plugholes to add a subtle screw profile so that, in the sinks north of the equator the water would go one way and in those south of the equator, the other way.

And that's my dream.

You can't inspire people with facts
- Small Gods

[ Parent ]
Nice idea. by ambrosen (2.00 / 0) #43 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 12:11:42 PM EST
But which way would you make the plugholes drain? The wrong way or the right way?

[ Parent ]
Have Heard Tell of Such by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #44 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 01:13:02 PM EST
I've heard tell of schemes not too dissimilar down in Ecuador, where tour operators have rigged contraptions that "demonstrate" the Coriolis Effect in action. This has been offered to me as proof of the matter by people suckered into such traps while on holiday.


Science-fiction wallah, storytelling gorilla, man wearing a hat: Cheeseburger Brown.
[ Parent ]
Confirmation Bias by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #45 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 01:14:19 PM EST
...is a very strong force for warping what we witness.


Science-fiction wallah, storytelling gorilla, man wearing a hat: Cheeseburger Brown.
[ Parent ]
you are wrong to think by sasquatchan (2.00 / 0) #37 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 10:44:59 AM EST
a boat floats on water and you're supposed to be a skipper.. ;)


Well by duxup (2.00 / 0) #38 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 11:04:55 AM EST
I agree, so that makes you right. 
____
But by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 1) #46 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 01:14:55 PM EST
I know by duxup (2.00 / 0) #47 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 02:23:16 PM EST
I'm old enough now to wonder if I do anything for the right reasons, or even what the right reasons are.
____
[ Parent ]
mostly by garlic (4.00 / 2) #50 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 04:19:31 PM EST
we're selfish meat robots that justify our actions post action, and trick ourselves into thinking we had thought about it ahead of time.


[ Parent ]
Amen by duxup (4.00 / 1) #52 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 04:41:53 PM EST
*looks at tummy*

LOOK AT THIS!  

A LOGICAL / RATIONAL HUMAN WOULDN'T DO THIS! 
____
[ Parent ]
LOL by dmg (2.00 / 0) #51 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 04:36:02 PM EST
The fact is that they were not controlled demolitions disguised as attacks

That's certainly a valid opinion. However, I reserve the right to remain skeptical.
--
dmg - HuSi's most dimwitted overprivileged user.

Face It by CheeseburgerBrown (4.00 / 1) #54 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 05:32:50 PM EST
My post wouldn't have been at all interesting if I hadn't included a couple of facts that would surely be points of dispute. It is, as you say, a matter of opinion and not knowledge.

Never the less, it's amazing how the set of people who vocally disagree with me on this subject are heavily biased toward sloppy thinkers.


Science-fiction wallah, storytelling gorilla, man wearing a hat: Cheeseburger Brown.
[ Parent ]
Some people obsess about stuff by Herring (2.00 / 0) #56 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 06:42:29 PM EST
Like websites that had one mildly amusing joke over a decade ago.

You can't inspire people with facts
- Small Gods

[ Parent ]
You dunno what you're talking about so shut it! by ambrosen (2.00 / 0) #57 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 06:51:08 PM EST
It's slightly under a decade ago actually.

[ Parent ]
I have twice attempted to post by ambrosen (2.00 / 0) #58 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 06:53:45 PM EST
a cogent and interesting explanation of why I did not fit this category when I rejected your Facebook post on the WHO press release about mobiles and cancer, but both times closed the tab by accident. Bah! Ten year old mice that double middle-click suck, yo.

Mice Are For Pussies by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #63 Tue Jun 07, 2011 at 10:37:55 AM EST
I'm sure you don't fit this category, ambrosen. I think if you really put your mind to it, though, you too could work up the egocentric and paranoid blinkerism necessary to start a long and profitably irritating career as a fuckwit. Anything is possible if you believe in it enough.*

_______
* Except infinite belief


Science-fiction wallah, storytelling gorilla, man wearing a hat: Cheeseburger Brown.
[ Parent ]
I thought you were suggesting infinite belief by ambrosen (2.00 / 0) #64 Tue Jun 07, 2011 at 10:56:10 AM EST
Anyway, the only reason I wanted to revisit that was because I thought there were subtle, interesting points to be made, not because wah! wah! wah! everyone's wrong.

[ Parent ]
Infinite Disbelief Is More Flexible by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #65 Tue Jun 07, 2011 at 04:31:33 PM EST
I would assume it would be for the former and not the latter, ambrosen. You've seen me shoot my mouth off too many times to assume it'd worth any bother to go the wah! route.


Science-fiction wallah, storytelling gorilla, man wearing a hat: Cheeseburger Brown.
[ Parent ]
Are you sure about that? by lm (2.00 / 0) #59 Mon Jun 06, 2011 at 09:22:48 PM EST
``please rest assured as a reader here on HuSi that the `you' in the text isn't actually you. It's somebody else altogether.''

I think I probably exemplify the excoriated behavior.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
I Might Be Wrong by CheeseburgerBrown (2.00 / 0) #62 Tue Jun 07, 2011 at 10:35:26 AM EST
It's more of an inclusive "not-you" than an exclusive "not-you" with regard to the filtering of individuals from the "you." That is to say it's an opt-in generalization, or, if you like, a class action identity.


Science-fiction wallah, storytelling gorilla, man wearing a hat: Cheeseburger Brown.
[ Parent ]