Operation Become More Stoic?

Good idea   0 votes - 0 %
Bad idea   1 vote - 100 %
 
1 Total Votes
Computer by hulver (4.00 / 2) #1 Sun Feb 22, 2009 at 12:17:25 AM EST
Take a screenshot (or photo) of the error message. Take it back to them.

They can't deny it's a problem if you've got a photo of it.
--
Cheese is not a hat. - clock

Aha, good idea! [nt] by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #2 Sun Feb 22, 2009 at 12:42:14 AM EST

--
It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?
[ Parent ]
heh by ucblockhead (4.00 / 1) #3 Sun Feb 22, 2009 at 06:04:22 AM EST
When I was having troubles getting "Diablo II" to run because if their stupid DRM, I actually used my camcorder to make a movie of me putting the CD in the drive and then showed the screen as it popped up the "CD not found" message. Not that that helped...
---
[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
[ Parent ]
Visas by ucblockhead (4.00 / 1) #4 Sun Feb 22, 2009 at 06:09:07 AM EST
My mother has similar issues with US immigration. She's a beadworker, and sponsors artists from Peru and other central/south American countries to display their work for a week during shows in museums in Santa Fe. The rules are arcane and difficult and it is often hard for the artists, who are usually dirt-poor women from villages in the back country, to meet them. (For instance, proving they have a bank account in their home country.)
---
[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
Public Borrowing by jimgon (4.00 / 1) #5 Sun Feb 22, 2009 at 06:11:30 AM EST
What I've found interesting lately are the reports that the Fed will be buying more Federal bonds, especially those being released as part of the economic stimulus.  In essence the Fed is starting the printing presses to flood us with more cheap dollars.  The banking system isn't lending, and regardless of how much people think Americans are saving and paying down debt that's a bit off.  People aren't borrowing, but since people were using borrowing to compensate for a lack of income we aren't really building assets.  So even with an interest rate of zero there's no lending, and there's no true build-up of capital.  The Fed needs to increase inflation and it's left with one option, strarting the printing press, but doing so in a way that most people won't recognize.  Even the conservatives are accepting the thinly vieled illusion of fiscal responsibility.  The Federal Government is borrowing money from the Federal Bank, but we're supposed to beleive it won't fuel inflation. 




---------------
Technician - "We can't even get decent physical health care. Mental health is like witchcraft here."
"Quantitative Easing" by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #6 Sun Feb 22, 2009 at 06:22:01 AM EST
They really need to think up a snappier term for it, since everyone's just calling it "printing money". The Bank of England is strongly considering it... not sure the US is quite doing it yet.

It's theoretically a good way to fight deflation, but it's never really been proven to work. Japan tried it, without much effect either way: didn't seem to do any significant harm or good.

I had quite an ironic argument with Breaker over it a while ago, where I was cautiously optimistic about it and he was dead against it. Since he's massive net debtor (i.e. new homeowner) he benefits from inflation and will be harmed by deflation. As a saver, I will be harmed by inflation, and benefit from deflation.

So really I should be the one screaming out against it. Deflation for the win!
--
It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?

[ Parent ]
IIRC by Breaker (4.00 / 1) #10 Mon Feb 23, 2009 at 05:23:27 AM EST
I made the point that I'd rather take the hit and see the country back on its feet sooner than count the interest on my savings.

I still stand by that; QE is going to fuck us over for years.


[ Parent ]
You're not facing a short-term hit though by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #11 Mon Feb 23, 2009 at 05:50:33 AM EST
Suppose they avoid QE and we have, say, 50% deflation across the board.

So, prices in the shops are halved, my salary's halved, your salary's halved, my rent's halved, the price of your house is halved...

But your outstanding mortgage stays the same, and your monthly mortgage payments stay the same.

Basically you either declare bankruptcy and lose the house, or you spend years digging yourself out of negative equity...
--
It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?

[ Parent ]
Underwater mortgage by jimgon (2.00 / 0) #15 Sun Mar 01, 2009 at 08:02:30 AM EST
And that precisely the problem we're starting to face in the states.   Rational people will start to look at the return on investement on paying down a mortgage without supporting real estate value and deciding it doesn't make sense.  I've started the thought process myself, but I haven't determined what the break point is where maintaining the mortgage isn't going to be worth it.  The inventory of excess homes in the US isn't really expected to clear out for another ten years (regardless of what the politicians say).




---------------
Technician - "We can't even get decent physical health care. Mental health is like witchcraft here."
[ Parent ]
I thought by Scrymarch (2.00 / 0) #13 Thu Feb 26, 2009 at 02:33:28 PM EST
Helicopter drop was pretty snappy.

The Political Science Department of the University of Woolloomooloo

[ Parent ]
Inflation by jimgon (2.00 / 0) #14 Sun Mar 01, 2009 at 07:57:27 AM EST
As a solid debter I'm waiting with baited breath for the inflationary cycle.  The government has two choices increase inflation or get banks to write down debt.  The current economic cycle isn't going be broken until there's some sort of equalibrium created.  There is of course bankruptcy, but under the Bush bankruptcy deform of a few years ago it doesn't help.   That and the zombie banks need to be broken up or taken into receivership and refloated.




---------------
Technician - "We can't even get decent physical health care. Mental health is like witchcraft here."
[ Parent ]
Looking forward to Rodchenko and Popova by nebbish (4.00 / 1) #7 Mon Feb 23, 2009 at 01:18:29 AM EST
I'm saving it for a dull weekend because I know I'll love it. Went to Altermodern on Saturday - a mixed bag, like you say. I liked Charles Avery's drawings of his fantasy ecosystem.

Glad I took out my Tate membership, it's really worth it.

--------
It's political correctness gone mad!

Tate membership's pretty good by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #8 Mon Feb 23, 2009 at 01:38:53 AM EST
Not sure whether to renew my Royal Academy membership though. Needed it last year, but there's not as much content as the Tate.

Make sure you check out the Member's Room balcony at Tate Modern if you haven't already...
--
It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?

[ Parent ]
I went a couple of weeks ago by nebbish (4.00 / 1) #9 Mon Feb 23, 2009 at 01:47:26 AM EST
Taking two friends as I thought you could take two guests, turns it you can only take one though so I still haven't tried it.

--------
It's political correctness gone mad!

[ Parent ]
On the subject of your subject line by iGrrrl (2.00 / 0) #12 Tue Feb 24, 2009 at 08:25:05 AM EST

 I knew a woman who was a homebrew judge. She specialized in judging stouts, which she soundly disliked as a beer. She said it made her more objective as to "true to style."


"Beautiful wine, talking of scattered everythings"
(and thanks to Scrymarch)