?

Drop the penny   7 votes - 87 %
Keep the penny   1 vote - 12 %
-   1 vote - 12 %
Putin is competent   5 votes - 62 %
Putin is incompetent   1 vote - 12 %
-   1 vote - 12 %
Marx and Hayek can be reconciled   1 vote - 12 %
Marx and Hayek cannot be reconciled   4 votes - 50 %
 
8 Total Votes
You can't abolish the 1p coin by komet (4.00 / 1) #1 Sat Jan 19, 2008 at 03:30:37 AM EST
without also getting rid of either the 2p or the 5p, otherwise you haven't really changed the step size.

In my view, it would make better sense to get rid of the 1p and 5p coins for a step size of 1/50 £. But you just know the politicians would be silly and abolish the 1p and 2p.

And if the 2p is abolished, those fairground coin-pushers, and therefore society as a whole, will cease to exist.

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<ni> komet: You are functionally illiterate as regards trashy erotica.

I would have said abolish 2ps too by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #2 Sat Jan 19, 2008 at 04:21:41 AM EST
But the coin-pusher thing is a powerful argument.

They did have £1 versions of them, but you'd have to be pretty rich to play.

There must be a Flash version of those online somewhere...
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It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?

[ Parent ]
They' ve been advocating abolishing the US penny by georgeha (4.00 / 2) #3 Sat Jan 19, 2008 at 05:07:10 AM EST
for decades, we still have it. If I'm thinking, I bring 5 with me when shopping for exact change, otherwise they pile up until I get enough to roll a few dollars worth.


I do the same thing by houser2112 (4.00 / 1) #23 Tue Jan 22, 2008 at 02:29:25 AM EST
although you really only need 4.

[ Parent ]
Why was the Euro made so small? by herbert (4.00 / 1) #4 Sat Jan 19, 2008 at 05:44:50 AM EST
When they invented the Euro, I was thinking pounds were getting a bit small.  And then they made Euros even less than a pound.

If they'd made Euros worth about 5 or 8 times what they actually did, then even with some inflation you would probably have had a couple of decades before they got annoyingly small again.

I think they wanted it to be by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #6 Sat Jan 19, 2008 at 06:21:44 AM EST
Slightly more valuable than the dollar.
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It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?
[ Parent ]
Pah, too subtle. by herbert (4.00 / 1) #13 Sat Jan 19, 2008 at 09:18:48 AM EST
They should have made it a real showoff currency by setting it at about 50 dollars, and having millis instead of cents.


[ Parent ]
The Gods Must Be Crazy by superdiva (4.00 / 1) #5 Sat Jan 19, 2008 at 05:52:21 AM EST
Hm. I watched that film in a freshman film class. I liked the film or, actually, the unconventional film techniques. The comedy was obvious, but I appreciated the larger point it made about our perceptions of "civilized".

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I'm not so sure that it has aged well by lm (4.00 / 1) #8 Sat Jan 19, 2008 at 07:48:46 AM EST
When it was released back in the eighties, it was a notable film in many respects. The more interesting techniques have long since been widely adopted and make what used to be exceptional into something that seems more commonplace. Unless you understand that this or that convention or technique was not popular until it was used in this film, you miss out on a lot of what made it such a great movie.

Actually, I had the same experience when re-watching Bladerunner with my wife the other day. So many things that were hugely innovative back then have become so part and parcel of the sci-fi film industry that they are more notable when they're lacking.

But in both cases, they do still have fairly powerful themes that are regrettably lacking in most other films.


There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
heh, which version of Blade Runner? by superdiva (4.00 / 1) #12 Sat Jan 19, 2008 at 09:14:21 AM EST
I'm assuming that you've watched the recently release Final Cut.  I watched the Director's Cut version, but I doubt the artistic changes by Ridley Scott will be that much different.

Interestingly enough, I like Blade Runner because it's the closest movie version of Neuromancer I can watch even though Blade Runner is adapted from Do Androids.....

Rumor has it there's a Neuromancer movie coming out in 2009.  Fingers crossed.

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Psych-E.org on RSS Feed

[ Parent ]
That poor book. by Christopher Robin was Murdered (4.00 / 2) #16 Sat Jan 19, 2008 at 11:09:13 AM EST
If IMDB's info is solid, the rat-tailed Anakin (Hayden Christensen) will be Case and the director is the dude behind Torque (a dumbed down Fast and Furious on motorbikes instead of cars) and not one, but two Britney Spears videos.

I wouldn't say suckage is a foregone conclusion . . .

[ Parent ]
Oh, fuck me with chainsaw... by superdiva (4.00 / 1) #18 Sat Jan 19, 2008 at 12:08:03 PM EST
Hayden Christensen?

Let's hope something drastic happens during filming, like, a stunt accident or something.

_________________________________________________
Psych-E.org on RSS Feed

[ Parent ]
The one we watched was ``the final cut'' by lm (4.00 / 1) #20 Sat Jan 19, 2008 at 06:33:53 PM EST
Most of the differences were insubstantial to everyone except the Bladerunner cultists.

There is no more degenerate kind of state than that in which the richest are supposed to be the best.
Cicero, The Republic
[ Parent ]
Relative purchasing power by Vulch (4.00 / 1) #7 Sat Jan 19, 2008 at 06:40:06 AM EST

According to that conversions site, a fiver today buys just under 8 shillings worth at the time the ten bob note was withdrawn.

I agree by ambrosen (2.00 / 0) #11 Sat Jan 19, 2008 at 08:58:41 AM EST
I think we'll have a £5 coin before we lose the penny. It's psychological.

And as the most valuable currency unit in the world (as of 1st Jan), I'd assume that the pound will lose its hundredth pretty much after everything else. The last currencies I've used which have no hundredth have been worth much less than a pound. I can't remember if the one pfennig lasted to the end of the deutschmark, but it's only the ore and the centime that I recall having been available as a minimum denomination of 5.

[ Parent ]
They'll need to do a redesign by Vulch (4.00 / 1) #15 Sat Jan 19, 2008 at 10:16:54 AM EST

The Mint started issuing five pound coins when it got too expensive to make crowns (five shillings, 25p) for special occasions. They're big though, an inch and a half across (the crown dates back nearly 500 years, so a lot older than metric measurements!) and weighing an ounce. You wouldn't want a hundred quids worth in your pocket for long.

I suspect we'll not see widespread use of five pound coins though, Gordon will decide the various criteria have been met and we'll get to use whatever the design they come up with for the five euro coin.

[ Parent ]
Well yes, by ambrosen (4.00 / 1) #19 Sat Jan 19, 2008 at 04:24:40 PM EST
the commemorative £2 coins were different to the ones now in circulation, too.

[ Parent ]
You sure they weren't colourised? by ammoniacal (4.00 / 1) #9 Sat Jan 19, 2008 at 08:24:29 AM EST
It was pretty expensive back then, especially in time of war.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

They had a mini "Making-of" documentary by TheophileEscargot (4.00 / 1) #10 Sat Jan 19, 2008 at 08:31:54 AM EST
Where they talked about colour, mentioning that most of the US footage from the last couple of years of the war was in colour.
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It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?
[ Parent ]
I'm not familiar with the tech timeline for film. by ammoniacal (4.00 / 1) #14 Sat Jan 19, 2008 at 09:20:18 AM EST
I suspect they had created a newer, cheaper technique for making color film at that point.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
Color film in World War II by Christopher Robin was Murdered (4.00 / 2) #17 Sat Jan 19, 2008 at 11:36:49 AM EST
My understanding is that it wasn't a price issue so much as a curious quirk of frame size that kept so much of the visual record in black and white.

Color film was cheap and available by 1935, but it was mostly sold in 16mm format with the amateur filmmaker in mind. Professionals and army photographers usually preferred shooting in a larger format to get a bigger visual frame. It wasn't a technical limitation as much as a aesthetic choice: Most felt the larger frame was more important than the color.

That said, color film was made throughout the war. John Ford's film unit shot extensive color film of the immediate aftermath of the Pearl Harbor attack. Multiple documentaries were made in color: John Ford's The Battle of Midway (1942), Darryl Zanuck's At the Front in North Africa (1943), William Wyler's The Memphis Belle (1944), and To the Shores of Iwo Jima (1945).

But this recent spate of "unknown" color films comes mostly from non-official photographers, soldiers that (against standing orders, actually) filmed the conflict with their personal 16mm cameras. This is why it was "lost" for so long - individual soldiers and civilians had it in their private collections because they took the images for their own personal record. 

[ Parent ]
I blame Adam Smith by Scrymarch (4.00 / 2) #21 Sat Jan 19, 2008 at 07:13:35 PM EST
The Invisible Hand must have seemed like a bloody clever metaphor at the time, but it's biting (or perhaps punching?) him in the arse now. It's all like, why does Rover have to shut down, and the answer isn't that they make expensive shit that no-one really likes, but that the Invisible Hand has pushed it into bankruptcy. The response of "stupid hand, if I run into him down the pub I'll teach him a thing or to" is almost inevitable.

As for endogenous vs exogenous variables, go for it, I'm not feeling stupid enough today. One starting point might be that occasional American bit of economic folk wisdom, "What this country needs is another war, WWII was great for the economy".

The Political Science Department of the University of Woolloomooloo

Actually by Scrymarch (4.00 / 1) #22 Sat Jan 19, 2008 at 07:27:17 PM EST
Not sure if that's an example of endogenous vs exogenous at all. This is why you should post about it :)

The Political Science Department of the University of Woolloomooloo

[ Parent ]
It's not actually a ve by garlic (4.00 / 1) #24 Tue Jan 22, 2008 at 05:42:38 AM EST
I was hopeing the rest of the title would turn out to be 'neral disease'. I was disapointed.


Sorry to disappoint you [nt] by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #25 Tue Jan 22, 2008 at 08:25:18 AM EST

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It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?
[ Parent ]