Interesting?

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Whoa. by blixco (4.00 / 1) #1 Fri Sep 07, 2007 at 10:00:43 AM EST
I totally didn't think that one was you.

In fact, I missed a few.  I thought for sure that Kellnerin wrote "Telling This With a Sigh."  I'm pretty sure I don't know anyone's style.

Mine was self-revealing, I'm pretty sure.  It reads like a diary entry.
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"You bring the weasel, I'll bring the whiskey." - kellnerin

This time... by ana (4.00 / 1) #2 Fri Sep 07, 2007 at 10:03:49 AM EST
I got nearly all of them. I missed scrymarch (I always forget about him) and TPD.

One beta-suggestion was to diminish the small lesbian content (an ana-story giveaway) by changing the gender of either the main character (which I was stuck with) or the spouse (who's hardly there in the present version, so I did that).

Power up your flaming yo-yos already! --StackyMcRacky

[ Parent ]
I knew by blixco (4.00 / 1) #3 Fri Sep 07, 2007 at 10:06:51 AM EST
that "Directions" was from a Bostonian, but I didn't  know who.

I think your story was really very good.  I love the language in it, the dictionary your story used.  I think, yeah, you could find quite the series of stories in that universe.  Very good stuff.
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"You bring the weasel, I'll bring the whiskey." - kellnerin

[ Parent ]
Rather amusing... by ana (4.00 / 1) #4 Fri Sep 07, 2007 at 10:13:54 AM EST
Directions, at least part of it, is written very much in the style of a real-life directions file I sent to Kellnerin a week or two prior to the story's appearance here. And, it turns out, the roads all lead to more or less where K used to live (I don't know if it's exactly right, but within half a mile certainly).

Power up your flaming yo-yos already! --StackyMcRacky

[ Parent ]
yeah well by Kellnerin (4.00 / 1) #6 Fri Sep 07, 2007 at 04:26:28 PM EST
As I said, it's hard to make up directions from whole cloth. I did used to live in a town that had some funky sorts of intersections that would make for at least some minor interest in the series of directions. I actually didn't think I really got your style in my piece ... I think yours was more distinctive (though maybe that's because it's a style other than my own, familiar one), and would have made a better entry than mine, but I could hardly have submitted it.

As for yours, I think you did pretty well with your edits. I remember the very first stab at it as being a bit more confusing, actually, even though (or perhaps because) it was more detailed. And as usual, the story's strength is in the character (characters? How do you refer to two versions of the same self?) and how her/their idiosyncratic outlook on the view. "Ah, future self of mine. I see you need a new Lor-Tom engine. Good thing I've got my tools." Lovely understated humor.

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"Late to the party" is the new "ahead of the curve" -- CRwM

[ Parent ]
I think maybe by ana (2.00 / 0) #7 Fri Sep 07, 2007 at 04:42:27 PM EST
the right way to write a story like yours is to pick an actual place, and drive to it multiple times from different directions. The folks who live there might think you're weird, if course, but that's their problem. And then, if you like, you can imagine the Dairy Dome going out of business and being replaced by a Starbucks or whatever.

Oddly, research is something we rarely talk about, with respect to writing fiction. There's more to it than poking buttons on the intarwebs (though I can imagine playing with Google Earth might be fun).

Power up your flaming yo-yos already! --StackyMcRacky

[ Parent ]
that would absolutely by Kellnerin (4.00 / 1) #8 Fri Sep 07, 2007 at 04:46:20 PM EST
have been the right way to do it. Or even just find an interesting landmark or neighborhood, and choose something in the area. Unfortunately, I didn't quite have time to do it that way. Research for fiction is an underrated art, except as a form of procrastination ...

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"Late to the party" is the new "ahead of the curve" -- CRwM
[ Parent ]
Neat by theantix (4.00 / 1) #5 Fri Sep 07, 2007 at 10:31:51 AM EST
I tend to wait til that day when my mind is exceptionally clear, and I can hold all the details of the algorithm in my head at once, and then write the program all in one sitting. And then change things only reluctantly, because never again is the vision of exactly what I’m doing quite so clear as it was on that first morning of creation. If I had a nickel for every time I’ve decided that no, that bug fix I just installed is completely wrong and I had it right the first time, I’d be several dollars richer.

Same exact process I use.  In cases of complex design which will take more than one sitting to implement, I do a high-level process diagram which serves as a reference so that when I approach it the next day I can get the entire picture in my head again. 

Which I can use again for bugfixes, if I don't get in that mindframe of understanding the whole picture and why each piece went where I end up changing something that was essential for another part of the greater mechanism. 

I can totally see how that would apply to story writing though I never considered it before now.
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I'm sorry, but your facts disagree with my opinion.

Putting the fie in SF by Scrymarch (4.00 / 1) #9 Fri Sep 07, 2007 at 05:32:32 PM EST
You know, my thought on reading it was of Philip K Dick and his soft sf end of the spectrum. Which I was happy to read, but it's interesting that you consciously took a lot of the science out, rather than leaving it out because you're not really interested in the mechanics, which seems the usual SF track.

I wouldn't have minded a bit more physics in there actually, though it might not have been the right choice for the audience. And it's much harder to do with outright As You Know Bobisms which do rather break the flow.

Cool story, thanks.

The Political Science Department of the University of Woolloomooloo