My Saint Patrick's Days plans are...

Drink Irish alcohol   2 votes - 28 %
Drink green alcohol   0 votes - 0 %
Wear something green   1 vote - 14 %
watch a parade   1 vote - 14 %
Get into a fight with parade matchers who's politics I disagree with   2 votes - 28 %
eat corned beef and cabbage   1 vote - 14 %
donate money to the IRA   2 votes - 28 %
sing Irish songs   1 vote - 14 %
drunkenly sing Irish songs   1 vote - 14 %
sport a "Kiss Me I'm Irish" shirt or button   0 votes - 0 %
Ask a woman is she has a little Irish in her, and if she doesn't, ask her if she wants some   2 votes - 28 %
a churchy thing to celebrate Saint Paddy   0 votes - 0 %
start a group to reintroduce snakes to Eire   3 votes - 42 %
Root for Irish teams in the NCAA   0 votes - 0 %
watch the NCAA   3 votes - 42 %
 
7 Total Votes
Kids and the angry desert god. by Christopher Robin was Murdered (4.00 / 2) #1 Fri Mar 16, 2007 at 06:49:32 AM EST
From my admittedly limited theological knowledge (I'm a Sunday school teacher and not a scholar by any stretch), kids seem to have an easier time with the Old Testament God than adults do.

My theory is that, to children, the exercise of authority always seems one-sided, arbitrary, and absolute. They understand the God of Moses the way they understand their parents. Like all parents, the Old Testament God means well and says everything he's doing is for the good of his people; but little he does seems to make sense, much of it is thoroughly unpleasant, and there's no appeal against him because he's the God that's why.

Eventually, however, the kids grow into a more nuanced understanding of authority and power and the Old Testament model seems like less and less like something they recognize from their own life.

I've never heard it by muchagecko (4.00 / 1) #2 Fri Mar 16, 2007 at 06:56:09 AM EST
explained your way before, but it makes sense. I loved the Old Testament as a kid. I read it straight through at least 4 times.

I might have also liked the SciFi feel to the Old Testament.

The only people to get even with are those that have helped you.

[ Parent ]
There's that too. by Christopher Robin was Murdered (4.00 / 1) #4 Fri Mar 16, 2007 at 07:10:56 AM EST
I think most kids find Jesus really bland. They feel he's just a really nice guy who gets hurt by bad people. It is, to a young child, basically a story about getting picked on by bullies. That's both depressing and dull. Not half as interesting as floods and magical transformations and all that jazz from the Old Testament.

As an aside, we've read a fair bit of sci fi in Sunday school. The kids seem to like it and it gets us into conversations. They liked the first two books of the Lewis trilogy, but not the third. They found Philip K. Dick more weird than interesting and gave that the thumbs down.

[ Parent ]
I wish they'd made me read VALIS in Sunday School by ammoniacal (4.00 / 2) #18 Fri Mar 16, 2007 at 12:36:10 PM EST
I probably wouldn't be a fucking agnostic today.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
We read The Divine Invasion. by Christopher Robin was Murdered (4.00 / 1) #21 Sat Mar 17, 2007 at 03:24:57 AM EST
I thought that if they dug that, we'd do VALIS and Timothy Archer. Unfortunately, they just didn't dig it. I think the teens are comfortable with controversy. Reading a book in which God dies or some similarly un-churchy thing happens would be fine with them. But they are not as cool with uncertainty. Give them a story where the narration is unreliable (we read Young Goodman Brown) or, as in this case, the story flips through several different realities and they don't like it. They spend nearly all their time fighting with the story to settle the issue of what actually happened, determined to resolve the narrative.

Any suggestions for books you would have rather read in Sunday school? Preferably there should be some God/fate/morality element, if only to justify the book purchases to the church, but it need not be pro-Christian.

[ Parent ]
Yes. by ammoniacal (2.00 / 0) #23 Sat Mar 17, 2007 at 10:08:04 AM EST
Lord of the Flies.

"To this day that was the most bullshit caesar salad I have every experienced..." - triggerfinger

[ Parent ]
Good one! by Christopher Robin was Murdered (2.00 / 0) #24 Sat Mar 17, 2007 at 10:12:34 AM EST
A great suggestion. I'll pitch it to the kids.

[ Parent ]
That makes sense by georgeha (4.00 / 1) #3 Fri Mar 16, 2007 at 06:56:40 AM EST
I'm sure my girls consider my pronouncements of no computer until homework is done, and no extra dessert to be arbitrary and inexplicable.


[ Parent ]
Unless they can appeal to the Mom God. by Christopher Robin was Murdered (4.00 / 1) #5 Fri Mar 16, 2007 at 07:23:53 AM EST
Which is the allure of a polytheistic belief system.

[ Parent ]
A couple days ago, when it was 80 out by wiredog (2.00 / 0) #6 Fri Mar 16, 2007 at 07:24:11 AM EST
I saw lots of bikes on the road. Also some hotties sunning themselves. Bikes and boobies, two signs of spring.

Tonight we're expecting snow.

Only 63 days to beach season.

Earth First!
(We can strip mine the rest later.)

Cruiser riders seem less weather dependent by georgeha (2.00 / 0) #7 Fri Mar 16, 2007 at 07:28:36 AM EST
then again, I expect most cruiser riders aren't interested in scraping pegs and having their skin depend on no salt, gravel or sand leftover from winter hanging around the corners.

I saw some lasses in thin tight shirts a few days ago too.


[ Parent ]
we'll be at the beach tomorrow by StackyMcRacky (2.00 / 0) #13 Fri Mar 16, 2007 at 08:18:57 AM EST
for a crawfish boil!

[ Parent ]
Twisted Sister by ucblockhead (2.00 / 0) #8 Fri Mar 16, 2007 at 07:43:43 AM EST
Jesus Christ, you've got to get her *away* from that crap soon, before it damages her brain.

I recommend switching it with Motorhead.
---
[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman

I should search for some Motorhead by georgeha (2.00 / 0) #9 Fri Mar 16, 2007 at 07:48:28 AM EST
since they never came to Rochester when I was into metal.


[ Parent ]
Do by ucblockhead (2.00 / 0) #10 Fri Mar 16, 2007 at 07:51:18 AM EST
There's great stuff to be had. Sometimes, nothing does it like "Ace of Spades".

Like now, for instance!
---
[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman

[ Parent ]
I had to ban that cassette from my car by georgeha (4.00 / 1) #11 Fri Mar 16, 2007 at 07:53:12 AM EST
it made me do crazy things in my parents Datsun.


[ Parent ]
can't reply by ucblockhead (4.00 / 1) #12 Fri Mar 16, 2007 at 07:59:20 AM EST
banging head.
---
[ucblockhead is] useless and subhuman
[ Parent ]
Guiness by jimgon (2.00 / 0) #14 Fri Mar 16, 2007 at 09:37:37 AM EST
I picked up a twelve pack for $11.99 plus deposit last week.  You've been robbed.




---------------
Technician - "We can't even get decent physical health care. Mental health is like witchcraft here."
I haven't been robbed yet by georgeha (4.00 / 1) #15 Fri Mar 16, 2007 at 09:40:17 AM EST
I shall see what I find this afternoon on the way home.


[ Parent ]
Happy St Patty's Day by jimgon (2.00 / 0) #22 Sat Mar 17, 2007 at 07:19:49 AM EST
Tonight is corned beef, cabbage, Guiness and Jameson night.  And I'm not even Irish.




---------------
Technician - "We can't even get decent physical health care. Mental health is like witchcraft here."
[ Parent ]
Thank you, tonight is corned beef, cabbage by georgeha (2.00 / 0) #25 Sat Mar 17, 2007 at 10:24:09 AM EST
Guinness ($14 a twelve pack), ersatz-Bailey's, and dougnuts with green sprinkles for the kids.


[ Parent ]
WIPO: Hunker in our basement, cursing Bush by ObviousTroll (2.00 / 0) #16 Fri Mar 16, 2007 at 10:43:10 AM EST
as the Republican-induced-climactic-change ice storm slowly buries our home in ice.

Also. YOU LISTENED TO THE RUN DMC VERSION OF WALK THIS WAY IN HIGH SCHOOL?!?

Sheesh. And here I was treating you like a mature adult of stature. Why, you can't be more than 35 or so!

As for OT god versus NT god, I kind of pictured Him as much like any father. Doting and kind until the kids make him snap and he decides He's just gonna have to sHaKe SoMe SeNsE iNtO THOSE little INGRATES! Later, when he cooled off, he realized that that didn't work either so he went to plan B, also known as the "celestial guilt trip".

--
Cur etiam hic es?

Maybe it was college by georgeha (2.00 / 0) #17 Fri Mar 16, 2007 at 11:28:28 AM EST
it probably was college, as I just hit 41.


[ Parent ]
It would have to be. by ObviousTroll (2.00 / 0) #20 Fri Mar 16, 2007 at 01:16:13 PM EST
The Run DMC version hit in my senior year of college, and the next year Aerosmith came out with Permanent Vacation - I remember listening to it as I was going furniture shopping with my love slave SWHTL.

--
Cur etiam hic es?
[ Parent ]
hm by Merekat (2.00 / 0) #19 Fri Mar 16, 2007 at 01:15:19 PM EST
I think $7 for 4 is cheaper than you'd pay in Dublin. But I don't drink canned or bottled stout.

But you'd be drinking in Dublin, and it would be by georgeha (2.00 / 0) #26 Sat Mar 17, 2007 at 10:26:05 AM EST
fresh. I ended up with a 12 pack of the draught with the dookickey inside for $14 USD.


[ Parent ]
Snakes into Eire? by ambrosen (2.00 / 0) #27 Sat Mar 17, 2007 at 10:40:11 AM EST
I didn't know they'd respect the land borders in Ireland.

You wouldn't need a very tall fence by georgeha (2.00 / 0) #28 Sat Mar 17, 2007 at 10:51:34 AM EST
six inches maybe.


[ Parent ]