Oliver Cromwell?

Good   2 votes - 66 %
Bad   1 vote - 33 %
 
3 Total Votes
Nice pics by cam (4.00 / 1) #1 Sun Jul 16, 2006 at 10:55:48 AM EST
Are the London buses still double-deckers due to tradition or function?

Canberra used to have these weird buses that had a half-bus on the back with a canvas concertina to keep them visually together. Not sure why they didnt just buy British double deckers, being RHD and plentiful in London you would assume they would be fairly cheap.

cam
Freedom, liberty, equity and an Australian Republic

They're introducing by TheophileEscargot (4.00 / 1) #2 Sun Jul 16, 2006 at 11:01:36 AM EST
"Bendy buses": single decker buses in two sections with a concertina in the middle. I hope they don't phase out double-deckers though: you don't get much of a view from a single-storey bus. Some of the double deckers look pretty new.

London transport has zero concern with tradition: any old stuff around is there purely because they don't want to pay for new stuff. You can obviously get more people in a double decker than a rigid single-decker, which means you only have to pay one driver's salary. Not sure if there's an advantage over bendy buses though: they might be able to get around tighter corners or do better in traffic.
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It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?

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Bendy buses by komet (4.00 / 1) #4 Sun Jul 16, 2006 at 12:22:26 PM EST
Zurich recently trialed an insane double bendy bus that seats 200. I was surprised at how tight it turned round corners - the bendy bits really seem to assist in that. I wouldn't be surprised if your bendy buses actually have a smaller turning circle than the Routemasters.

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<ni> komet: You are functionally illiterate as regards trashy erotica.
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Not a Routemaster, probably, by ambrosen (2.00 / 0) #7 Sun Jul 16, 2006 at 01:54:01 PM EST
they're actually really tiny and light (8 tons), despite taking a lot of people. But a modern double decker's quite a bit larger (11 tons), and longer.

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We have double-decker buses by spacejack (4.00 / 1) #6 Sun Jul 16, 2006 at 12:48:26 PM EST
They make the British tourists feel at home when they're sightseeing along Queen Street, King street, Charles Street, Elisabeth Street, Prince Arthur, Kensington Market, Queen's Park, etc.

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bendies by MillMan (2.00 / 0) #9 Sun Jul 16, 2006 at 04:02:47 PM EST
fairly common in the US on longer express routes, and I did see some of them while I was in London. I think the double deckers are much more practical in a crowded city like London for the simple reason that they have a smaller footprint.

Everybody still hates me in this city and I hate everybody.

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Oh yeah by TheophileEscargot (4.00 / 2) #3 Sun Jul 16, 2006 at 11:03:24 AM EST
You've probably seen this video already: P47 gun camera footage from WW2.
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It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?
[ Parent ]
Clumsy fakes by Rogerborg (4.00 / 2) #5 Sun Jul 16, 2006 at 12:25:21 PM EST
I've seen the real footage on the Hitler Channel, and it's alll "Neeeaaaawwww - DACKA-DACKA-DACKA - ach, Gott in Himmel"

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Metus amatores matrum compescit, non clementia.
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Bleu cheese. by ambrosen (4.00 / 1) #8 Sun Jul 16, 2006 at 01:55:30 PM EST
Very strange portmanteau word.

Poll should be multi-select. by greyrat (4.00 / 1) #10 Sun Jul 16, 2006 at 04:07:07 PM EST


Oxford Street by nebbish (4.00 / 1) #11 Sun Jul 16, 2006 at 11:46:10 PM EST
Even cycling down it on Saturday was a nightmare, the buses were so close together you couldn't get between them, and just had to sit there waiting and breathing in the fumes.

You're better off walking than getting the bus on a normal day, they take ages.

Cold Skin sounds interesting: wishlisted.

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It's political correctness gone mad!

Need to get rid of the buses, replace with a tram by jump the ladder (4.00 / 2) #12 Mon Jul 17, 2006 at 12:18:58 AM EST
Seriously, the air is horrid with all the diesel fumes. The only problem is that Oxford St is a major east-west axis of London so you'd have to rejig half thwe bus system.

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A+ idea though by nebbish (4.00 / 1) #13 Mon Jul 17, 2006 at 12:40:30 AM EST
It's awful as it stands

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It's political correctness gone mad!

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Hybrids would work by squigs (4.00 / 1) #14 Mon Jul 17, 2006 at 12:50:52 AM EST
They tend to use the battery at low speed and are most efficient with the stop start nature of buses on busy roads.

You could actually manage a complete electrical system if you could find a practical way to recharge at each stop.

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fuel cell by garlic (4.00 / 1) #16 Mon Jul 17, 2006 at 07:07:24 AM EST
Busses are a good case for fuel cells since many of the drawbacks of a fuel cell for a car doesn't have the same effect in a bus.


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If you're interested in more Seven Year's War... by atreides (4.00 / 1) #15 Mon Jul 17, 2006 at 03:37:46 AM EST
...I'm reading Crucible of War: The Seven Years' War and the Fate of Empire in British North America, 1754-1766 and it's quite good thus far... It's scholarly without being dry and does a good job of combining Brit, US, French and Native sources to give it a much more multifaceted view than most works on war. As a bonus, it posits that the Revolution was actually a result of the postwar problems this war created though I haven't gotten that far yet.

Have you seen The Passion yet? Here's a spoiler for you: Jesus dies.
"...compassion is more than a 16 point word in scrabble." - MostlyHarmless


Schama by TheophileEscargot (2.00 / 0) #17 Mon Jul 17, 2006 at 08:15:57 AM EST
Also gives it a certain amount of influence. The war against the French in the Americas was hugely expensive and led to a huge war debt for the British government, so it seemed pretty unreasonable when the colonists refused to pay taxes towards their defence.
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It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?
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