Print Story City of Arson
Politics
By nebbish (Fri Jul 09, 2004 at 02:30:26 AM EST) (all tags)
Just over a year ago my parents moved a few miles west from my childhood home in Leeds to Keighley, a town on the edge of the north Bradford suburbs, so my dad could be closer to his work. Having lived in London for the past few years, going to visit my parents in this depressed region of Britain has been a real eye opener, explaining some of the frustration and disenchantment with mainstream party politics northern England is currently suffering.










Keighley is a weird place. Geographically, it sits on the border between multicultural north Bradford, the natural beauty of the Yorkshire Dales and the impoverished towns of north Lancashire, and takes a bit from all of them. The countryside surrounding Keighley is beautiful, and luckily my parents bought a house ten minutes walk away from lonely moorland. I did a bit of walking up there over Christmas, and despite being clad in city Reebok and it being freezing enjoyed it thoroughly - it's great being able to step out of your front door and potter up to the moors by yourself.

My parent's house is at the posh end of one of Keighley's two main South Asian areas. Hyde Park in Leeds where I grew up is also a largely Asian area, so it feels quite homely in that respect. Unfortunately, the area my parents live in and the Braithwaite Estate that sits above it are also dumping grounds for Bradford City Council's problem tenants, and there is a surprisingly ingrained and open heroin problem in the area.

My dad is a probation officer, so knows a bit more about the ins and outs of this than most. There were four gang-related murders in 2002. Two of these were shootings, and two were more traditionally English, involving people having their heads caved in with breezeblocks. This isn't a city we're talking about - it's a Yorkshire town with a population of about 40,000.

Things have calmed down a bit since, but heroin seems to make up a large part of local life. Shortly after my parents moved to Keighley I went to second-hand electrical shop in the centre of town to see if they had any cheap games. A group of Asian lads, the proprietors, sat on tatty chairs smoking skunk whilst a couple of smackheads fenced them a carrier bag full of stolen X-Box games. I didn't stick around for long. My dad said the police know about the place, but keep it under surveillance rather than close it down. Apparently, heroin users in rural North Yorkshire come to Keighley to sell stolen goods and buy smack - it's the last outpost of urban West Yorkshire before you get to the Dales, and consequently has a bit of the border town about it.

In February 2003 when my parents moved to this godforsaken place, I was up visiting from London and a mate came over from Leeds to see me. We took a shitload of MDMA powder and spent five confusing and decidedly surreal hours staggering about on the moors above my parent's house and around the town itself. On Christmas Eve last year, I remembered from our ecstasy wanderings that there was a moody and windswept tarn on the moors off one of the main roads to Halifax, and decided to walk up there.

It was a beautiful winter evening, the wind rattling the bare trees, grey clouds fast-forward across the sky, lonely apart from two cars full of youths parked up by the tarn, steaming up the windows with spliffs. I asked my dad about this later, and he told me that the tarn is a major drug dealing point where people from Halifax and Huddersfield drive to buy heroin and crack. Despite being a beautiful and lonely place, in reality the tarn is only a few minutes walk from the Braithwaite Estate, which is discreetly tucked away below the brow of a hill.

The police and everyone in the town know about this drugs supermarket, but nothing much is done because West Yorkshire Metropolitan Police are so overstretched. Leeds and Bradford are the third and sixth largest British cities respectively, and suffer a culture of criminality and violence that makes them particularly difficult to police - Bradford in particular has a murder rate which far outstrips its size, and both cities have been home to regular rioting since the early eighties. West Yorkshire towns such as Keighley are suffering similar problems to the cities, but it is a recent phenomenon and the police have yet to catch up.

When I lived in Leeds one of my mates was really into heroin. He used to drive over to Keighley to buy it off a bloke in his forties who lived in a high-rise estate at the edge of town. The dealer never handled the heroin himself - you knocked at his door and a few minutes later a child would turn up with a wrap and take your money. My mate had hit a dead end in his life after leaving university. He became an addict. Heroin shuts the world out and makes you not give a shit about anything, and unfortunately that was just what he needed. He cleaned up completely last year, thank god, but it says a lot about Keighley that it is such a big part of life there.

It is a desperate place, suffering the economic depression that is still a feature of much of northern England; but Keighley's main problem is that it is a suburb of the city of Bradford. Similar towns in West Yorkshire have problems, but Keighley's are uniquely exported from a city in real crisis, suffering from ineffective government, economic depression and social collapse.

Late last summer me and my dad did a five mile walk across inner-city north Bradford, to make a change from the usual hikes up Pendle Hill and Ilkley Moor. We were there to look at some of the wonderful nineteenth-century industrial architecture north Bradford is home to; and Undercliffe Cemetery, where the graves of the founders of the Labour Party lie - the Labour Party was formed in Bradford by disaffected Liberals at the end of the nineteenth century as a response to rapid industrialisation, the accompanying poverty, and non-recognition of trade unions. It is part of Bradford's proud industrial heritage.

For someone who hadn't visited the city since I moved to London seven years ago, going back was a bit of a shock. The Lumb Lane and Manningham Lane areas of Bradford have always had a reputation for prostitution, but on this early Saturday afternoon Wapping, Undercliffe and Manningham - a three mile area of inner north Bradford - all had prostitutes patrolling the streets: teenage smackheads walking in the shadows of boarded up maisonettes and terraces in grubby miniskirts, middle-aged men in company cars slowing and soliciting. I can't really convey just how shocking this was - it was open, and it was everywhere, right across a broad crescent of the inner city. I don't think there can be another British city like it.

The city is in a bad way. Bradford was one of the first cities to suffer the post-industrial recession that hit northern England, and is one of the last places where it still lingers. On every other street a small business - a shop, a car mechanic, a pub, a restaurant - had been torched for insurance. In Manningham, long rows of shops sat burnt out and empty from the riots of 1981, 1995, and 2001. My dad quipped that rather than applying for European City of Culture last year, Bradford should have applied for European City of Arson.

We walked through Manningham and up into Lister to see the magnificent Lister Mills, one of Britain's most impressive pieces of industrial architecture. It has been empty for nearly twenty years. The council is trying to sell it to developers to convert into luxury flats, but it was obvious that there was no way this could ever happen - the poverty of the area was striking.

Lister is not just predominantly Asian, but maybe uniquely for Britain, solely Asian. Both myself and my dad have lived in multiracial areas all our lives, so it took us a while to realise that people were actually staring at us on the streets. There was nothing malicious - a couple of young children shouted benchaud at me (translation - motherfucker), and ran off laughing when I returned with harami (bastards); old Muslim blokes in kalwa shamiz buying vegetables from outside grocers nodded in greeting as we walked past.

But at the same time there were gangs of youths watching whilst my dad took photos of the mill with his digital camera, and West Yorkshire Metropolitan Police signs everywhere warning about street robberies, so I suggested we should leave. There was graffiti on the boarded-up windows of the mill that read Islamic Jihad and Hamas. It was an effort for my dad to get his head round this - in the probation service, he works with Muslims who aren't so religious that they won't pop round for a pint of home-brewed bitter at Christmas, and invite him round to their homes for a slap-up meal after Eid.

Race is another one of Bradford's problems. The entire city is racked with poverty, but divided into neglected white council estates in the south, and sub-standard nineteenth century terraced housing, predominantly Asian, in the north. The two don't mix.

In the 1960s and 1970s when most of the immigration to Bradford from Pakistan, Bangladesh and India took place, cheap Asian labour was seen as a way to compete with the government-funded technological advances in the textile industry that were taking place in the rest of Europe. In the absence of government support in the UK, Yorkshire and Lancashire mill owners realised that by employing a low-paid night shift of immigrant workers from the Commonwealth they could produce more and undercut the competition.

A day-shift of well-paid unionised white workers and a night-shift of underpaid non-union Asian workers was the norm in the 1960s and 1970s, not just in Bradford but also smaller textile towns in the region - Huddersfield, Halifax, Dewsbury, Rochdale, Oldham, Blackburn, Burnley, Colne, Nelson - which suffer from a similar racial divide. From the off, whites and Asians didn't just not mix, they existed in different time frames. It isn't surprising that it is these northern towns where the racist British National Party has had most success in recent years.

In the early 1980s when this labour-intensive production became uncompetitive in the face of technology-driven production in Germany, Italy and the United States, as it was bound to do, the non-union Asians lost their jobs first - but the whites soon followed. Whilst northern textile towns suffer a racial divide, both sides suffer high unemployment and poverty. The industrial recession in the urban north hit everyone eventually.

In Bradford, the blight was confounded in the 1970s when the city's borders were extended to take in large tracts of rural and suburban West Yorkshire - the reason why, for an ostensibly small city, Bradford is the sixth largest in the country, with a population greater than Manchester or Liverpool. The boundary changes meant that a Conservative council, serving the wealthier communities outside the city itself, was voted in in the early 1980s. It remains Britain's only Conservative city council. The Conservatives work for the benefit of Bradford's rural suburbs, where their voters are.  Issues of poverty and race in the inner city have never been properly addressed.

Consequently Bradford has suffered. Neighbouring Labour-controlled Leeds clamped down on street prostitution after the Yorkshire Ripper years, but the problem was driven to Bradford, where it was neglected and left to grow into a market serving both cities. Projects for racial integration were left in a chaos of self-appointed community leaders with agendas of their own, rather than a centralised council strategy. Programmes to deal with drug abuse, a mainstay of any urban area, were underfunded. South Bradford, where my dad worked as a probation officer for five years, is suffering a heroin epidemic that leaves no family untouched. The white Ravenscliffe and Buttershaw estates (setting for the film Rita, Sue and Bob Too) are in such a state that even my dad, a firm believer in the essential goodness of people, has warned me not to go near.

In recent years, Bradford has been notable for regular rioting. Unusually for a northern town, these riots have not just been an Asian response to marches by the fascist BNP - it surprised everyone when in 2001 the white estates in south Bradford erupted alongside Asian north Bradford. These riots were a direct response to the grinding poverty and underinvestment the city has suffered since the early 1980s. And nothing has changed - whilst European Union money trickles into a city that is one of western Europe's poorest, the British government has done nothing.

The economic renaissance of formerly depressed northern cities such as Manchester and Leeds have been sung highly in the British press. Bradford, the forgotten city, was abandoned by the Conservatives and has now been abandoned by the Labour Party too. It suffers problems too entrenched for market forces and local government to deal with. There has been no improvement since the recession first hit; if anything, it has got worse over recent years. It is shocking that the Labour Party, which owes its very birth to the city, has decided to leave Bradford to rot rather then tackle its problems - which are a microcosm of the economic disaster still affecting parts of northern England.

Print references -

"Hand On The Sun", Tariq Mahmood.

"It's A Mean Old Scene: A History Of Modern Bradford From 1974", Jim Greenhalf.

And big thanks to idiot boy and CwazyWabbit, for this K5 thread.

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City of Arson | 73 comments (45 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback
Another reason for Bradford's ghettoisation by idiot boy (6.00 / 4) #12 Thu Jul 08, 2004 at 02:00:36 AM EST
I remember us chatting about this on K5 ages ago. You've done an excellent piece here - nice one.

Either way, it might be worth adding that another reason for Bradford's (and the mill towns) ghettoisation is that Councils acted as "gatekeepers" in the early days of immigration to the North.

There were unwritten rules (albeit rigourously followed) that ensured that Asians were housed in areas that had been demarcated for Asian occupation. Over time, with the departure of whites to more affluent areas and continued immigration, the councils helped ensure that Whites and Asians lived in strongly demarcated areas.

The effect of this sort of policy is best seen in Northern Ireland where Catholics and Protestants have historically been housed in their "own" areas. We all know how very well that's worked out and the problems in Bradford and the mill towns can easily be traced to this and the other causes you mentioned.



I might see if I can get that in by nebbish (3.00 / 0) #14 Thu Jul 08, 2004 at 02:08:42 AM EST
There are a few things about Bradford I've unintentionally missed out that I might see if I can work in somehow. Another reason for its lack of regeneration success is that it is on a transport cul-de-sac - no through major rail or road routes.

Do you have any sources for what you say about gatekeeping? In the thread I've linked to you say you couldn't find any. I think there might be something in Hand on the Sun about it but it's been ages since I read it.

Lack of sources is a real problem for this subject, hence me citing print references. There's practically nothing on the internet.

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It's political correctness gone mad!
[ Parent ]

You're right by idiot boy (6.00 / 1) #26 Thu Jul 08, 2004 at 02:42:47 AM EST
Bloody sociologists seem to be afraid of the Internet. It'll be in some ancient sociology text book but a five minute Google today came up a blank.

I think all my textbooks are in the loft at my mams. I'm up there next week so I'll have a shufty.

[ Parent ]

It's 2004 by Rogerborg (6.00 / 5) #24 Thu Jul 08, 2004 at 02:28:37 AM EST
It's the information age.

There's no reason that Parliament needs to be tied to London.  Other than that they like it there, well serviced and protected by London Weighting civil servants.

If Saxon and Norman kings could run the country while travelling around it, our MPs can too.

Get them on the road.  Better yet, get them on the trains.

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Metus amatores matrum compescit, non clementia.


Yorkshire Devolution by nebbish (3.00 / 0) #25 Thu Jul 08, 2004 at 02:34:01 AM EST
Is a real possibility. Unfortunately as any Parliament would either be in wealthy York or Leeds I'm not sure it would do much good. There is an unfortunate, backward kind of reactionary thought running through much of Yorkshire as well.

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It's political correctness gone mad!
[ Parent ]

Oh great by idiot boy (6.00 / 1) #27 Thu Jul 08, 2004 at 02:48:18 AM EST
Geoffry bloody Boycott running the region. I can see it now.

Regional parliaments are a sham as things stand. Toothless boondoggles that will serve only to create yet more beurocracy and stupidity.

Not against them in principle, just don't trust central government to give up sufficient power to make it actually worthwhile.

[ Parent ]

York is definitely not multi-cultural. by hulver (6.00 / 1) #28 Thu Jul 08, 2004 at 02:56:35 AM EST
I grew up in the outskirts of York, and the School I went to (a normal Comprehensive school) had precisely 4 non-whites in my whole year (out of about 200 kids), only 1 of whom was Asian. I think there were only about 10 non-white in the entire school.

Even now, a non-white face will really stand out when you're in town shopping.

I was surprised once when I went to Bradford on a College trip to the Museum of Photography. They had black mannequins in the shops, I'd never seen that before.

That and the whole "Burn all the Jews" thing, makes York the worst place to put an assembly.
--
Cheese is not a hat. - clock
[ Parent ]

It's isolated as well by nebbish (3.00 / 0) #29 Thu Jul 08, 2004 at 03:01:15 AM EST
It'd make much more sense to have the assembly in urban West or South Yorkshire. Incidentally, I haven't seen Sheffield mentioned as a possible candidate once.

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It's political correctness gone mad!
[ Parent ]

Sheffield by hulver (3.00 / 0) #30 Thu Jul 08, 2004 at 03:06:46 AM EST
Too close to Derbyshire, and we don't want that.

If you're looking at History, York is a fairly good place, being historically a regional capital. Leeds would be better though, as it's got better transport links.
--
Cheese is not a hat. - clock
[ Parent ]

Wakefield and Barnsley have been mentioned by nebbish (3.00 / 0) #32 Thu Jul 08, 2004 at 03:16:31 AM EST
As the regional seats of government for West and South Yorkshire respectively, as a possible (but unlikely) choice. I think either of them would be a better choice, as they are both in need of regeneration and are in the geographical centre of the region.

I'd go for Wakefield - it has better transport links, and I'm a Westy as well so I would :-)

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It's political correctness gone mad!
[ Parent ]

It's wessie [NT] :) by idiot boy (3.00 / 0) #35 Thu Jul 08, 2004 at 04:17:24 AM EST


[ Parent ]

It's funny but by idiot boy (3.00 / 0) #34 Thu Jul 08, 2004 at 03:26:27 AM EST
I think Leeds would piss off an awful lot of people if it was the choice. There's definately a degree of "those uppity bloody Loiners" around Yorks.

Practically speaking, yes, it's probably the best choice but politically perhaps not.

Really, the first thing to do is to just do away with the East, North, South, West division.

[ Parent ]

Sheffield multiculturalism by gazbo (3.00 / 0) #31 Thu Jul 08, 2004 at 03:10:36 AM EST
Well, I don't see any real racial tensions, but whether by design or accident there is a definite Asian ghetto in Darnall.  It is very rare indeed that one passes through Darnall and sees a single white face.

That said, the gangs of Asian kids who hang around Darnall look altogether like they're probably a lot less trouble than the gangs of white kids 2 miles away on Handsworth.


I recommend always assuming 7th normal form where items in a text column are not allowed to rhyme.

[ Parent ]

Generally Sheffield seems OK by nebbish (3.00 / 0) #33 Thu Jul 08, 2004 at 03:24:19 AM EST
At least from what I've seen. It's like Leeds - there's a bit of money there so people get along better.

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It's political correctness gone mad!
[ Parent ]

Makes as much sense as Scottish devolution by gpig (3.00 / 0) #37 Thu Jul 08, 2004 at 05:31:03 AM EST
Though I opposed Scottish devolution, I think it's had a good few benefits. I incline towards the view that decentralising power gives people more confident about their regional identity, so I'd be surprised if it leads to more Yorkshire 'nationalism' in the long run. That said it's not clear how far that goes in Scotland -- the numbers in favour of independence haven't really budged.

Reunification with Middlesbrough would be nice too.
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(,   ,') -- eep
[ Parent ]

can we please have less of this british stuff? by rmg (4.57 / 7) #36 Thu Jul 08, 2004 at 04:40:25 AM EST
honestly, who cares about england?




[t]rolling retards conversation, period.


Back to Troll School Fool by ToyChicken (6.00 / 1) #43 Fri Jul 09, 2004 at 12:12:39 AM EST
Blimey, you must be a real nouveau troll. I admire your attempt to use a 'throw away' comment to provoke some inappropriately angry responses, but unfortunately, it makes you look like a twat. I'd suggest making the comment more related to the article in question. Perhaps aggravate the authors obviously left-wing, liberal tendencies by inciting a bit of racial hatred.

However, as an experienced Troll, I'll never miss an opportunity to take some bait. So...

You Americans should care about England, 'cos you're all too fat & stupid to fight your own wars.
I love Nebbish, he's the best...
[ Parent ]

good lord! by rmg (4.33 / 3) #48 Fri Jul 09, 2004 at 04:02:26 AM EST
hulver, can we get rid of this guy?




[t]rolling retards conversation, period.
[ Parent ]

Of course you can... by ToyChicken (6.00 / 1) #51 Fri Jul 09, 2004 at 08:54:32 PM EST
...just stop posting daft comments...

http://www.kuro5hin.org/story/2003/11/9/145712/481
I love Nebbish, he's the best...
[ Parent ]

I thought by nebbish (3.00 / 0) #60 Sun Jul 11, 2004 at 08:49:48 PM EST
That was one of the best trolls I've seen in ages. You bit.

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It's political correctness gone mad!
[ Parent ]

American Wars by CheeseburgerBrown (6.00 / 2) #53 Sat Jul 10, 2004 at 09:32:55 AM EST
You Americans should care about England, 'cos you're all too fat & stupid to fight your own wars.

That's right -- that's why they have all those robots.


_____
I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.
[ Parent ]

Bloody Frenchman [nt] by nebbish (3.00 / 0) #64 Sun Jul 11, 2004 at 09:11:30 PM EST

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It's political correctness gone mad!
[ Parent ]

Fun Fact by Bob Dog (4.50 / 4) #39 Thu Jul 08, 2004 at 06:22:43 AM EST
In USian law-enforcement, arson is often called Jewish Lightning.
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I think often is a stretch by grouse (5.00 / 1) #55 Sat Jul 10, 2004 at 10:33:12 PM EST
The reason is that it implies Jews set fire to their own buildings in order to collect the insurance money. Many wack-o conspiracy theorists refer to the 11 September attacks as the ultimate case of Jewish lightning.

This is similar in content to saying that in USian law-enforcement black people are often called "niggers." Mostly not true and offensive. In some ways more offensive since the N word does not in itself imply that black people are more likely to commit certain kinds of crimes.

[ Parent ]

Heh by zantispam (3.00 / 0) #74 Mon Sep 13, 2004 at 06:50:37 AM EST
that in USian law-enforcement black people are often called "niggers.

s/USian law-enforcement/USistan/

Especially in the South and more so in black culture.

-- no sig
[ Parent ]

Dunno what the answer is by jump the ladder (3.00 / 0) #45 Fri Jul 09, 2004 at 01:57:50 AM EST
But unfortunately the days when unskilled and semi skilled labour paid livable wages is over. Since both the white working classes and muslim asians don't seem to value education in Bradford and similar towns, it's hard to see any new industries moving there.

Actually I'm working in London borough which is pretty similar to Bradford, Tower Hamlets. Mixture of white working class and asian muslims. There's a place called Canary Wharf bang in the centre of it with thousands of highly paid jobs. But apart from the cleaners and shop workers, very few of the indigenous population have jobs here. It's not down to racism because therte's plenty of asians working here, just not from Tower Hamlets...



You're oversimplifying by nebbish (3.00 / 0) #46 Fri Jul 09, 2004 at 02:24:13 AM EST
What possible reason could there be for people in Leeds and Hammersmith to be more interested in getting an education than people in Bradford and Tower Hamlets? A lack of education is a symptom, not a cause.

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It's political correctness gone mad!
[ Parent ]

Simplistic maybe by jump the ladder (5.00 / 1) #47 Fri Jul 09, 2004 at 02:38:45 AM EST
But the basic point is that even if new industries are attracted into the area by the govt like what happenned at Canary Wharf, unless the locals have the skills and/or education they'll still remain poor.

[ Parent ]

Simplification by djguvnor (5.00 / 1) #65 Sun Jul 11, 2004 at 11:01:50 PM EST
Ok, very simple yes but it's catch 22.  Surely a large part of the reason people in Bradford have no interest in getting an education is because their life in Bradford doesn't expose teach them why they need an education to get out of the rut?  They're all too busy shooting up heroin because it's a damn sight easier than working at your studies for 10 years for an apparently unattainable goal.  As you said in your article however not many companies will move to the area because it is poor and the people poorly educated there is much less demand for unskilled labour these days.  Thus education is the answer to their problems in the long and short term and the cycle continues...

[ Parent ]

Not valuing education by Merekat (5.00 / 1) #66 Mon Jul 12, 2004 at 03:07:49 AM EST
I don't know if I am overgeneralising but it isn't as much not valuing education as actually considering it a negative thing, certainly anything higher than old O levels. I have a lot of relations around greater Manchester and without exception until recently, anyone who went to university was a waster and a parasite.

It was seen as far more dignified to be unemployed 'working' class. You have to question how many generations you go back to find an employeed person to still have a family count as working class though.

[ Parent ]

Don't expect everyone to by jump the ladder (3.00 / 0) #67 Mon Jul 12, 2004 at 03:57:50 AM EST
Go to uni but for a lot of people learning a  practical trade seems to be beyond their expectations.

[ Parent ]

What is the point? by Merekat (3.00 / 0) #68 Mon Jul 12, 2004 at 04:25:29 AM EST
There is nobody able to buy the results of the trade and nobody to get an apprenticeship with.

[ Parent ]

Depends what parts by jump the ladder (3.00 / 0) #69 Mon Jul 12, 2004 at 04:48:31 AM EST
Of Greater Manchester they're from really. Some bits are quite prosperous and Manchester itself has had a bit of renaissance in the last ten years.

[ Parent ]

argh by nathan (3.00 / 0) #50 Fri Jul 09, 2004 at 10:45:35 AM EST
Beat me to it.

I used to play cricket with the Subcontinentals at my USian school and that was about the first thing I learned: "Benchaud, benchaud, della benchaud!"



Crap comment by Herring (5.00 / 1) #52 Sat Jul 10, 2004 at 09:07:59 AM EST
I went to Keighly (pron. Keeflee IIRC) a couple of times on business. It looks fucking awful.

I think there are two ways in which people are controlled. First of all frighten people and secondly, demoralize them - ANW Benn


Most insightful comment yet by nebbish (5.00 / 1) #59 Sun Jul 11, 2004 at 08:47:34 PM EST
My entire story could have been condensed into that.

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It's political correctness gone mad!
[ Parent ]

Also by TheophileEscargot (3.00 / 0) #70 Mon Jul 12, 2004 at 08:08:54 AM EST
Until he posted, I didn't realise this Keighley place was the same as that Keethlee place they go on about on the news sometimes.
--
It is unlikely that the good of a snail should reside in its shell: so is it likely that the good of a man should?
[ Parent ]

I should have clarified that [nt] by nebbish (3.00 / 0) #71 Mon Jul 12, 2004 at 08:41:18 PM EST

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It's political correctness gone mad!
[ Parent ]

Superhero Void by CheeseburgerBrown (5.50 / 2) #54 Sat Jul 10, 2004 at 09:36:12 AM EST
Very interesting, nebbish. Thanks for doing this one up proper.

It sounds like me like they really need a superhero. I mean, isn't that just like what Gotham was like before Batman? Or New York before Spider-man? Needed: Hero!

Nebbish, will you don the leotard?


_____
I am from a small, unknown country in the north called Ca-na-da. We are a simple, grease-loving people who enjoy le weekend de ski.


I'd look pretty shit in a leotard by nebbish (6.00 / 1) #62 Sun Jul 11, 2004 at 08:55:06 PM EST
Though it might scare people into behaving.

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It's political correctness gone mad!
[ Parent ]

I've seen Nebbish in a leotard... by ToyChicken (3.00 / 0) #72 Fri Jul 16, 2004 at 01:44:07 AM EST
No really, my parents still have the photo's to prove it!

What super-powers would you have neb? Something about stepping over tall buildings in a single stride?
I love Nebbish, he's the best...
[ Parent ]

Cool! by ta bu shi da yu (6.00 / 1) #56 Sun Jul 11, 2004 at 03:29:53 AM EST
You finally got around to writing a story! Good for you. I'll read this tomorrow :-)



It was about time by nebbish (3.00 / 0) #63 Sun Jul 11, 2004 at 08:56:06 PM EST
I really didn't want to be someone who whinged about HuSi's failings whilst not doing anything about it.

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It's political correctness gone mad!
[ Parent ]

Nice one! [nt] by nebbish (3.00 / 0) #58 Sun Jul 11, 2004 at 08:45:30 PM EST

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It's political correctness gone mad!


Excellent piece by CwazyWabbit (6.00 / 1) #73 Fri Jul 16, 2004 at 04:31:23 AM EST
It's rare that something with such personal content makes a good article. My only problem with it is that it seems to cover pretty much everything, leaving nothing obvious to discuss ;)



City of Arson | 73 comments (45 topical, 0 hidden) | Trackback